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Microsaccade rate varies with subjective visibility during motion-induced blindness.

Hsieh PJ, Tse PU - PLoS ONE (2009)

Bottom Line: Here we report the first psychophysical data concerning effects of microsaccade/eyeblink rate upon perceptual switches during MIB.We find that the rate of microsaccades/eyeblink rises before and after perceptual transitions from not seeing to seeing the dot, and decreases before perceptual transitions from seeing it to not seeing it.In addition, event-related fMRI data reveal that, when a dot subjectively reappears during MIB, the blood oxygen-level dependent (BOLD) signal increases in V1v and V2v and decreases in contralateral hMT+.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, Moore Hall, Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire, United States of America. pjh@mit.edu

ABSTRACT
Motion-induced blindness (MIB) occurs when a dot embedded in a motion field subjectively vanishes. Here we report the first psychophysical data concerning effects of microsaccade/eyeblink rate upon perceptual switches during MIB. We find that the rate of microsaccades/eyeblink rises before and after perceptual transitions from not seeing to seeing the dot, and decreases before perceptual transitions from seeing it to not seeing it. In addition, event-related fMRI data reveal that, when a dot subjectively reappears during MIB, the blood oxygen-level dependent (BOLD) signal increases in V1v and V2v and decreases in contralateral hMT+. These BOLD signal changes observed upon perceptual state changes in MIB could be driven by the change of perceptual states and/or a confounding factor, such as the microsaccade/eyeblink rate.

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Stimuli.The rotating background stimulus for inducing MIB. It consisted of cyan crosses on a black background rotating counterclockwise at 70°/sec, as indicated by the yellow arrows (not present in stimulus). After fixating on the central fixation spot for several seconds, the cyan dot disappears and reappears alternatively.
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pone-0005163-g001: Stimuli.The rotating background stimulus for inducing MIB. It consisted of cyan crosses on a black background rotating counterclockwise at 70°/sec, as indicated by the yellow arrows (not present in stimulus). After fixating on the central fixation spot for several seconds, the cyan dot disappears and reappears alternatively.

Mentions: In each of the four stimulation blocks, a single target dot was presented in one of the four quadrants (left top, left bottom, right top, or right bottom) on a motion background (Figure 1). Subjects were required to indicate their perceptual state by pressing a button. Figures 2 and 3 show that the microsaccade/eyeblink rate was correlated with the type of perceptual switches during MIB. In Figure 2, eyeblink rate was significantly greater than the baseline rate both before and after a perceptual switch to the ‘see’ condition. In contrast, eyeblink rate was significantly smaller than the baseline both before and after a perceptual switch to the ‘no see’ condition. Figure 3 shows that the microsaccade rate was significantly greater than baseline both before and after a perceptual switch to the ‘see’ condition, and was significantly smaller than the baseline only before a perceptual switch to the ‘no see’ condition.


Microsaccade rate varies with subjective visibility during motion-induced blindness.

Hsieh PJ, Tse PU - PLoS ONE (2009)

Stimuli.The rotating background stimulus for inducing MIB. It consisted of cyan crosses on a black background rotating counterclockwise at 70°/sec, as indicated by the yellow arrows (not present in stimulus). After fixating on the central fixation spot for several seconds, the cyan dot disappears and reappears alternatively.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2664481&req=5

pone-0005163-g001: Stimuli.The rotating background stimulus for inducing MIB. It consisted of cyan crosses on a black background rotating counterclockwise at 70°/sec, as indicated by the yellow arrows (not present in stimulus). After fixating on the central fixation spot for several seconds, the cyan dot disappears and reappears alternatively.
Mentions: In each of the four stimulation blocks, a single target dot was presented in one of the four quadrants (left top, left bottom, right top, or right bottom) on a motion background (Figure 1). Subjects were required to indicate their perceptual state by pressing a button. Figures 2 and 3 show that the microsaccade/eyeblink rate was correlated with the type of perceptual switches during MIB. In Figure 2, eyeblink rate was significantly greater than the baseline rate both before and after a perceptual switch to the ‘see’ condition. In contrast, eyeblink rate was significantly smaller than the baseline both before and after a perceptual switch to the ‘no see’ condition. Figure 3 shows that the microsaccade rate was significantly greater than baseline both before and after a perceptual switch to the ‘see’ condition, and was significantly smaller than the baseline only before a perceptual switch to the ‘no see’ condition.

Bottom Line: Here we report the first psychophysical data concerning effects of microsaccade/eyeblink rate upon perceptual switches during MIB.We find that the rate of microsaccades/eyeblink rises before and after perceptual transitions from not seeing to seeing the dot, and decreases before perceptual transitions from seeing it to not seeing it.In addition, event-related fMRI data reveal that, when a dot subjectively reappears during MIB, the blood oxygen-level dependent (BOLD) signal increases in V1v and V2v and decreases in contralateral hMT+.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, Moore Hall, Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire, United States of America. pjh@mit.edu

ABSTRACT
Motion-induced blindness (MIB) occurs when a dot embedded in a motion field subjectively vanishes. Here we report the first psychophysical data concerning effects of microsaccade/eyeblink rate upon perceptual switches during MIB. We find that the rate of microsaccades/eyeblink rises before and after perceptual transitions from not seeing to seeing the dot, and decreases before perceptual transitions from seeing it to not seeing it. In addition, event-related fMRI data reveal that, when a dot subjectively reappears during MIB, the blood oxygen-level dependent (BOLD) signal increases in V1v and V2v and decreases in contralateral hMT+. These BOLD signal changes observed upon perceptual state changes in MIB could be driven by the change of perceptual states and/or a confounding factor, such as the microsaccade/eyeblink rate.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus