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An uncommon presentation: 66 year-old woman with a tumor-like medial meniscal cyst - a case report.

Figueiredo GC, Queiroga de Figueiredo EC, Marques EA - Clinics (Sao Paulo) (2008)

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

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Meniscal cysts are well-defined and documented lesions that were first reported by Nicaise in 1883 (according to Kurian, 2003) and are located adjacent to the peripheral margin of the meniscus... They are almost always associated with a meniscal tear... On examination, the patient had pain in the medial aspect of the joint line, with focal tissue swelling on the medial aspect of the knee... The swelling was large (Figure 1) and painful, but the knee did not lock or give way... Through a medial arthrotomy (Figure 5), the cyst was excised intact with its correspondent meniscus (Figure 6)... Because the fluid found in meniscal cysts is similar to sinovial fluid, the prevailing view is that cysts form from joint fluid that is forced through a peripherally extended meniscal tear and accumulates outside the joint capsule... Pain is most likely related to the associated meniscal tears, but discomfort may also be due to stretching of the knee capsule and other parameniscal soft tissues... The differential diagnosis for soft-tissue masses of the knee should include sinovial cyst formation, bursal fluid collections, ganglion cysts, severe degenerative changes with osteophytic spurring and soft-tissue masses such as pigmented villonodular sinovitis, lipoma, hemangioma and sarcomas... Meniscal cysts tend to recur after aspiration or simple resection... Therefore, open or arthroscopic intra-articular surgery to treat the underlying meniscal tear is necessary for successful therapy–... In conclusion, distinguishing meniscal cysts from other cystic lesions is important because meniscal cysts more often require surgery... In our case, the uncommon combination of mass size and location associated with the gender and age of the host led us to report it.

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f3-cln63_3p0411: T2 coronal view

Mentions: A 66-year-old woman had a history of mild pain in the left knee that had increased in severity over six months. There was no history of trauma. On examination, the patient had pain in the medial aspect of the joint line, with focal tissue swelling on the medial aspect of the knee. The swelling was large (Figure 1) and painful, but the knee did not lock or give way. On physical examination, a consistent and large, orange-sized mass could be seen and palped. Lachman’s, McMurray’s, and Apley’s tests were negative, and the range of motion was 0 - 110º. Magnetic resonance showed that the mass was multi-lobulated with thin septations and surrounded the medial collateral ligament (Figures 2, 3, 4). Through a medial arthrotomy (Figure 5), the cyst was excised intact with its correspondent meniscus (Figure 6). The specimen measured 50 x 40 x 40 mm and contained clear gelatinous material. A split retinacular graft was performed to fulfil the capsule failure. Histological examination showed chronic inflammation without malignancy. The patient was ordered to wear a brace with partial weight bearing for two weeks. Rehabilitation occurred uneventfully. After a 2-year follow-up, the patient had full range of articular motion with no recurrence.


An uncommon presentation: 66 year-old woman with a tumor-like medial meniscal cyst - a case report.

Figueiredo GC, Queiroga de Figueiredo EC, Marques EA - Clinics (Sao Paulo) (2008)

T2 coronal view
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2664239&req=5

f3-cln63_3p0411: T2 coronal view
Mentions: A 66-year-old woman had a history of mild pain in the left knee that had increased in severity over six months. There was no history of trauma. On examination, the patient had pain in the medial aspect of the joint line, with focal tissue swelling on the medial aspect of the knee. The swelling was large (Figure 1) and painful, but the knee did not lock or give way. On physical examination, a consistent and large, orange-sized mass could be seen and palped. Lachman’s, McMurray’s, and Apley’s tests were negative, and the range of motion was 0 - 110º. Magnetic resonance showed that the mass was multi-lobulated with thin septations and surrounded the medial collateral ligament (Figures 2, 3, 4). Through a medial arthrotomy (Figure 5), the cyst was excised intact with its correspondent meniscus (Figure 6). The specimen measured 50 x 40 x 40 mm and contained clear gelatinous material. A split retinacular graft was performed to fulfil the capsule failure. Histological examination showed chronic inflammation without malignancy. The patient was ordered to wear a brace with partial weight bearing for two weeks. Rehabilitation occurred uneventfully. After a 2-year follow-up, the patient had full range of articular motion with no recurrence.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

AUTOMATICALLY GENERATED EXCERPT
Please rate it.

Meniscal cysts are well-defined and documented lesions that were first reported by Nicaise in 1883 (according to Kurian, 2003) and are located adjacent to the peripheral margin of the meniscus... They are almost always associated with a meniscal tear... On examination, the patient had pain in the medial aspect of the joint line, with focal tissue swelling on the medial aspect of the knee... The swelling was large (Figure 1) and painful, but the knee did not lock or give way... Through a medial arthrotomy (Figure 5), the cyst was excised intact with its correspondent meniscus (Figure 6)... Because the fluid found in meniscal cysts is similar to sinovial fluid, the prevailing view is that cysts form from joint fluid that is forced through a peripherally extended meniscal tear and accumulates outside the joint capsule... Pain is most likely related to the associated meniscal tears, but discomfort may also be due to stretching of the knee capsule and other parameniscal soft tissues... The differential diagnosis for soft-tissue masses of the knee should include sinovial cyst formation, bursal fluid collections, ganglion cysts, severe degenerative changes with osteophytic spurring and soft-tissue masses such as pigmented villonodular sinovitis, lipoma, hemangioma and sarcomas... Meniscal cysts tend to recur after aspiration or simple resection... Therefore, open or arthroscopic intra-articular surgery to treat the underlying meniscal tear is necessary for successful therapy–... In conclusion, distinguishing meniscal cysts from other cystic lesions is important because meniscal cysts more often require surgery... In our case, the uncommon combination of mass size and location associated with the gender and age of the host led us to report it.

Show MeSH