Limits...
Physical exercise improves the functional capacity and quality of life in patients with heart failure.

Bocalini DS, dos Santos L, Serra AJ - Clinics (Sao Paulo) (2008)

Bottom Line: Baseline values did not differ between groups.Improvement in the trained group was identified in all components of functional capacity when compared to the untrained group (p<0.001).Quality of life improved in the trained patients concerning physical, psychological, social and environmental domains (p<0.001), whereas no significant change was found in the untrained patients.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Internal Medicine, Department of Medicine, Federal University of São Paulo, São Paulo, SP, Brazil. bocalini@fcr.epm.br

ABSTRACT

Objective: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of physical exercise on the functional capacity and quality of life in heart failure patients.

Methods: Forty-two patients of both sexes with heart failure of NYHA class II and III with different etiologies were randomly divided into untrained or trained groups. The six-month exercise program consisted of aerobic training, muscle strength training, agility and joint flexibility activities. Physical fitness was evaluated by testing the performance on these trained components. Quality of life was evaluated by scored answers to a standardized questionnaire involving multiple domains.

Results: Baseline values did not differ between groups. Improvement in the trained group was identified in all components of functional capacity when compared to the untrained group (p<0.001). Quality of life improved in the trained patients concerning physical, psychological, social and environmental domains (p<0.001), whereas no significant change was found in the untrained patients.

Conclusions: Guided and monitored physical exercise is safe and has the potential to improve functional capacity and quality of life in heart failure patients with multiple etiologies.

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

Functional capacity before, and 6 months after, physical exercise evaluated by fitness tests involving aerobic conditioning (Panel A); strength of lower (Panel B) and upper limbs (Panel C); agility (Panels D and E); and joint flexibility (Panel F). Different letters indicate statistically significant differences between the groups (p < 0.05). Data are expressed as the mean ± SD
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2664117&req=5

f1-cln63_4p0437: Functional capacity before, and 6 months after, physical exercise evaluated by fitness tests involving aerobic conditioning (Panel A); strength of lower (Panel B) and upper limbs (Panel C); agility (Panels D and E); and joint flexibility (Panel F). Different letters indicate statistically significant differences between the groups (p < 0.05). Data are expressed as the mean ± SD

Mentions: At the beginning of the study, and before the training program began, there were no significant differences between groups S and T for any functional capacity variables (Figure 1). However, after 6 months of follow-up, the T group had an impressive enhancement of performance on all functional tests (Figure 1). Furthermore, in trained patients, aerobic capacity was significantly improved, with the time to walk 800 meters reduced by 33 ± 8% (before: 16 ± 0.5 vs. after: 12 ± 0.9 minutes, p < 0.01) whereas no significant difference was found in untrained patients (before: 16.5 ± 0.8 vs. after: 15 ± 0.9 minutes). After the training period, skeletal muscle strength was improved in the T group, evaluated by the sitting and standing up from the chair test (S: 5 ± 3% vs. T: 47 ± 10% improvement; p < 0.001) and arm flexion (S: 1 ± 1 vs. T: 26 ± 3% improvement; p < 0.001). Tests analyzing the time taken to stand up from a chair and to stand up from the floor showed a significant reduction (p < 0.001) in the T group (chair: −39 ± 4% and floor: −44 ± 9% change in time) compared to the S group (chair: 0.8 ± 0.2% and floor: 4 ± 2% change in time), indicating an improvement in the agility of patients submitted to physical exercise training. Patients from the T group also had a significant enhancement (p < 0.001) of joint flexibility (46 ± 6% improvement) when compared to the untrained group (6 ± 6% improvement).


Physical exercise improves the functional capacity and quality of life in patients with heart failure.

Bocalini DS, dos Santos L, Serra AJ - Clinics (Sao Paulo) (2008)

Functional capacity before, and 6 months after, physical exercise evaluated by fitness tests involving aerobic conditioning (Panel A); strength of lower (Panel B) and upper limbs (Panel C); agility (Panels D and E); and joint flexibility (Panel F). Different letters indicate statistically significant differences between the groups (p < 0.05). Data are expressed as the mean ± SD
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2664117&req=5

f1-cln63_4p0437: Functional capacity before, and 6 months after, physical exercise evaluated by fitness tests involving aerobic conditioning (Panel A); strength of lower (Panel B) and upper limbs (Panel C); agility (Panels D and E); and joint flexibility (Panel F). Different letters indicate statistically significant differences between the groups (p < 0.05). Data are expressed as the mean ± SD
Mentions: At the beginning of the study, and before the training program began, there were no significant differences between groups S and T for any functional capacity variables (Figure 1). However, after 6 months of follow-up, the T group had an impressive enhancement of performance on all functional tests (Figure 1). Furthermore, in trained patients, aerobic capacity was significantly improved, with the time to walk 800 meters reduced by 33 ± 8% (before: 16 ± 0.5 vs. after: 12 ± 0.9 minutes, p < 0.01) whereas no significant difference was found in untrained patients (before: 16.5 ± 0.8 vs. after: 15 ± 0.9 minutes). After the training period, skeletal muscle strength was improved in the T group, evaluated by the sitting and standing up from the chair test (S: 5 ± 3% vs. T: 47 ± 10% improvement; p < 0.001) and arm flexion (S: 1 ± 1 vs. T: 26 ± 3% improvement; p < 0.001). Tests analyzing the time taken to stand up from a chair and to stand up from the floor showed a significant reduction (p < 0.001) in the T group (chair: −39 ± 4% and floor: −44 ± 9% change in time) compared to the S group (chair: 0.8 ± 0.2% and floor: 4 ± 2% change in time), indicating an improvement in the agility of patients submitted to physical exercise training. Patients from the T group also had a significant enhancement (p < 0.001) of joint flexibility (46 ± 6% improvement) when compared to the untrained group (6 ± 6% improvement).

Bottom Line: Baseline values did not differ between groups.Improvement in the trained group was identified in all components of functional capacity when compared to the untrained group (p<0.001).Quality of life improved in the trained patients concerning physical, psychological, social and environmental domains (p<0.001), whereas no significant change was found in the untrained patients.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Internal Medicine, Department of Medicine, Federal University of São Paulo, São Paulo, SP, Brazil. bocalini@fcr.epm.br

ABSTRACT

Objective: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of physical exercise on the functional capacity and quality of life in heart failure patients.

Methods: Forty-two patients of both sexes with heart failure of NYHA class II and III with different etiologies were randomly divided into untrained or trained groups. The six-month exercise program consisted of aerobic training, muscle strength training, agility and joint flexibility activities. Physical fitness was evaluated by testing the performance on these trained components. Quality of life was evaluated by scored answers to a standardized questionnaire involving multiple domains.

Results: Baseline values did not differ between groups. Improvement in the trained group was identified in all components of functional capacity when compared to the untrained group (p<0.001). Quality of life improved in the trained patients concerning physical, psychological, social and environmental domains (p<0.001), whereas no significant change was found in the untrained patients.

Conclusions: Guided and monitored physical exercise is safe and has the potential to improve functional capacity and quality of life in heart failure patients with multiple etiologies.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus