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New technologies to reduce pediatric radiation doses.

Bernhardt P, Lendl M, Deinzer F - Pediatr Radiol (2006)

Bottom Line: We present new developments to further decrease pediatric patient dose.Because objects of interest are quite small and the speed of motion is high in pediatric patients, short pulse widths down to 4 ms are important to reduce motion blurring artifacts.Further, a new noise-reduction algorithm is presented that detects and processes signal and noise in different frequency bands, generating smooth images without contrast loss.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Siemens AG, Siemensstr. 1, 91301 Forchheim, Germany. philipp.bernhardt@siemens.com

ABSTRACT
X-ray dose reduction in pediatrics is particularly important because babies and children are very sensitive to radiation exposure. We present new developments to further decrease pediatric patient dose. With the help of an advanced exposure control, a constant image quality can be maintained for all patient sizes, leading to dose savings for babies and children of up to 30%. Because objects of interest are quite small and the speed of motion is high in pediatric patients, short pulse widths down to 4 ms are important to reduce motion blurring artifacts. Further, a new noise-reduction algorithm is presented that detects and processes signal and noise in different frequency bands, generating smooth images without contrast loss. Finally, we introduce a super-resolution technique: two or more medical images, which are shifted against each other in a subpixel region, are combined to resolve structures smaller than the size of a single pixel. Advanced exposure control, short exposure times, noise reduction and super-resolution provide improved image quality, which can also be invested to save radiation exposure. All in all, the tools presented here offer a large potential to minimize the deterministic and stochastic risks of radiation exposure.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Results of the super-resolution approach on C-arm systems. The upper image is one of the 31 input images. The lower row shows a magnified cut-out of one of the original input images (left) and the resulting super-resolution image (right)
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Fig4: Results of the super-resolution approach on C-arm systems. The upper image is one of the 31 input images. The lower row shows a magnified cut-out of one of the original input images (left) and the resulting super-resolution image (right)

Mentions: We give two examples of the super-resolution technique. The results for the variable SID on C-arm systems is shown in Fig. 4. Out of 31 input images (upper image in Fig. 4) available, one high-resolution (super-resolution) image was calculated. The improvement in the spatial resolution is clearly visible by means of the cut-out in the lower row of Fig. 4.Fig. 4


New technologies to reduce pediatric radiation doses.

Bernhardt P, Lendl M, Deinzer F - Pediatr Radiol (2006)

Results of the super-resolution approach on C-arm systems. The upper image is one of the 31 input images. The lower row shows a magnified cut-out of one of the original input images (left) and the resulting super-resolution image (right)
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2663645&req=5

Fig4: Results of the super-resolution approach on C-arm systems. The upper image is one of the 31 input images. The lower row shows a magnified cut-out of one of the original input images (left) and the resulting super-resolution image (right)
Mentions: We give two examples of the super-resolution technique. The results for the variable SID on C-arm systems is shown in Fig. 4. Out of 31 input images (upper image in Fig. 4) available, one high-resolution (super-resolution) image was calculated. The improvement in the spatial resolution is clearly visible by means of the cut-out in the lower row of Fig. 4.Fig. 4

Bottom Line: We present new developments to further decrease pediatric patient dose.Because objects of interest are quite small and the speed of motion is high in pediatric patients, short pulse widths down to 4 ms are important to reduce motion blurring artifacts.Further, a new noise-reduction algorithm is presented that detects and processes signal and noise in different frequency bands, generating smooth images without contrast loss.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Siemens AG, Siemensstr. 1, 91301 Forchheim, Germany. philipp.bernhardt@siemens.com

ABSTRACT
X-ray dose reduction in pediatrics is particularly important because babies and children are very sensitive to radiation exposure. We present new developments to further decrease pediatric patient dose. With the help of an advanced exposure control, a constant image quality can be maintained for all patient sizes, leading to dose savings for babies and children of up to 30%. Because objects of interest are quite small and the speed of motion is high in pediatric patients, short pulse widths down to 4 ms are important to reduce motion blurring artifacts. Further, a new noise-reduction algorithm is presented that detects and processes signal and noise in different frequency bands, generating smooth images without contrast loss. Finally, we introduce a super-resolution technique: two or more medical images, which are shifted against each other in a subpixel region, are combined to resolve structures smaller than the size of a single pixel. Advanced exposure control, short exposure times, noise reduction and super-resolution provide improved image quality, which can also be invested to save radiation exposure. All in all, the tools presented here offer a large potential to minimize the deterministic and stochastic risks of radiation exposure.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus