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Interventional suite and equipment management: cradle to grave.

Strauss KJ - Pediatr Radiol (2006)

Bottom Line: Interventional imaging equipment is only as effective and efficient as its supporting facility.The clinical project leader needs to understand (a) clinical needs of the end users, (b) how to justify the cost of the project, (c) the technical needs of the imaging and all associated equipment, (d) building and construction limitations, (e) how to effectively read construction drawings, and (f) how to negotiate and contract the imaging equipment from the appropriate vendor.A comprehensive, ongoing maintenance and repair program is paramount to reducing costly downtime of the imaging device.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Radiology Physics and Engineering, Children's Hospital Boston, Harvard Medical School, 300 Longwood Ave., Boston, MA 02115-5737, USA. Keith.Strauss@tch.harvard.edu

ABSTRACT
The acquisition process for interventional equipment and the care that this equipment receives constitute a comprehensive quality improvement program. This program strives to (a) achieve the production of good image quality that meets clinical needs, (b) reduce radiation doses to the patient and personnel to their lowest possible levels, and (c) provide overall good patient care at reduced cost. Interventional imaging equipment is only as effective and efficient as its supporting facility. The acquisition process of interventional equipment and the development of its environment demand a clinical project leader who can effectively coordinate the efforts of the many professionals who must communicate and work effectively on this type of project. The clinical project leader needs to understand (a) clinical needs of the end users, (b) how to justify the cost of the project, (c) the technical needs of the imaging and all associated equipment, (d) building and construction limitations, (e) how to effectively read construction drawings, and (f) how to negotiate and contract the imaging equipment from the appropriate vendor. After the initial commissioning of the equipment, it must not be forgotten. The capabilities designed into the imaging device can be properly utilized only by well-trained operators and staff who were initially properly trained and receive ongoing training concerning the latest clinical techniques throughout the equipment's lifetime. A comprehensive, ongoing maintenance and repair program is paramount to reducing costly downtime of the imaging device. A planned periodic maintenance program can identify and eliminate problems with the imaging device before these problems negatively impact patient care.

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Rotating room C 90 degrees and relocating its control room creates a more strategic layout than Fig. 2. This procedure room can be lengthened or shortened (at the expense of only soft space, a supply store room) as dictated by future equipment. Reprinted with permission of Medical Physics Publishing [7]
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Fig3: Rotating room C 90 degrees and relocating its control room creates a more strategic layout than Fig. 2. This procedure room can be lengthened or shortened (at the expense of only soft space, a supply store room) as dictated by future equipment. Reprinted with permission of Medical Physics Publishing [7]

Mentions: After the location and size of the space program is complete, adjacencies within the imaging suite need to be planned. The biggest blocks of space, i.e., the imaging rooms, are placed first. Soft spaces with no clear-cut adjacencies are used to fill the gaps between the large blocks. These soft spaces can be converted in the future if new technology requires larger imaging rooms. Figures 2 and 3 demonstrate this principle.Fig. 2


Interventional suite and equipment management: cradle to grave.

Strauss KJ - Pediatr Radiol (2006)

Rotating room C 90 degrees and relocating its control room creates a more strategic layout than Fig. 2. This procedure room can be lengthened or shortened (at the expense of only soft space, a supply store room) as dictated by future equipment. Reprinted with permission of Medical Physics Publishing [7]
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2663637&req=5

Fig3: Rotating room C 90 degrees and relocating its control room creates a more strategic layout than Fig. 2. This procedure room can be lengthened or shortened (at the expense of only soft space, a supply store room) as dictated by future equipment. Reprinted with permission of Medical Physics Publishing [7]
Mentions: After the location and size of the space program is complete, adjacencies within the imaging suite need to be planned. The biggest blocks of space, i.e., the imaging rooms, are placed first. Soft spaces with no clear-cut adjacencies are used to fill the gaps between the large blocks. These soft spaces can be converted in the future if new technology requires larger imaging rooms. Figures 2 and 3 demonstrate this principle.Fig. 2

Bottom Line: Interventional imaging equipment is only as effective and efficient as its supporting facility.The clinical project leader needs to understand (a) clinical needs of the end users, (b) how to justify the cost of the project, (c) the technical needs of the imaging and all associated equipment, (d) building and construction limitations, (e) how to effectively read construction drawings, and (f) how to negotiate and contract the imaging equipment from the appropriate vendor.A comprehensive, ongoing maintenance and repair program is paramount to reducing costly downtime of the imaging device.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Radiology Physics and Engineering, Children's Hospital Boston, Harvard Medical School, 300 Longwood Ave., Boston, MA 02115-5737, USA. Keith.Strauss@tch.harvard.edu

ABSTRACT
The acquisition process for interventional equipment and the care that this equipment receives constitute a comprehensive quality improvement program. This program strives to (a) achieve the production of good image quality that meets clinical needs, (b) reduce radiation doses to the patient and personnel to their lowest possible levels, and (c) provide overall good patient care at reduced cost. Interventional imaging equipment is only as effective and efficient as its supporting facility. The acquisition process of interventional equipment and the development of its environment demand a clinical project leader who can effectively coordinate the efforts of the many professionals who must communicate and work effectively on this type of project. The clinical project leader needs to understand (a) clinical needs of the end users, (b) how to justify the cost of the project, (c) the technical needs of the imaging and all associated equipment, (d) building and construction limitations, (e) how to effectively read construction drawings, and (f) how to negotiate and contract the imaging equipment from the appropriate vendor. After the initial commissioning of the equipment, it must not be forgotten. The capabilities designed into the imaging device can be properly utilized only by well-trained operators and staff who were initially properly trained and receive ongoing training concerning the latest clinical techniques throughout the equipment's lifetime. A comprehensive, ongoing maintenance and repair program is paramount to reducing costly downtime of the imaging device. A planned periodic maintenance program can identify and eliminate problems with the imaging device before these problems negatively impact patient care.

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