Limits...
On the significance of Surfactant Protein-A within the human lungs.

Goldmann T, Kähler D, Schultz H, Abdullah M, Lang DS, Stellmacher F, Vollmer E - Diagn Pathol (2009)

Bottom Line: To date SP-A is recognized as a molecule essential for pulmonary development, structure and function.An upcoming number of reports deals with the role of SP-A for pulmonary pathology.This article gives an overview about the state of knowledge on SP-A focused in applications for human pulmonary disorders and points out the importance for pathology-orientated research approaches using immunohistochemistry or in situ hybridization as promising methods to further elucidate the role of this molecule in adult lung diseases.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Division for Clinical and Experimental Pathology, Research Center Borstel, Borstel, Germany. tgoldmann@fz-borstel.de

ABSTRACT
Surfactant Protein-A (SP-A) is the most prominent among four proteins in the pulmonary surfactant-system. SP-A is expressed by alveolar epithelial cells type II as well as by a portion of non small cell lung carcinomas (NSCLC).The expression of SP-A is complexly regulated on the transcriptional and the chromosomal level. SP-A is a major player in the pulmonary cytokine-network and moreover has been described to act in the pulmonary host defense.By the use of cell culture or animal models the functional properties have been repeatedly shown in many aspects, often bearing surprising properties which strongly indicate the physiological importance of SP-A. To date SP-A is recognized as a molecule essential for pulmonary development, structure and function. An upcoming number of reports deals with the role of SP-A for pulmonary pathology. This article gives an overview about the state of knowledge on SP-A focused in applications for human pulmonary disorders and points out the importance for pathology-orientated research approaches using immunohistochemistry or in situ hybridization as promising methods to further elucidate the role of this molecule in adult lung diseases.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

In situ hybridization targeting using a 663 bp digoxigenated DNA-probe complementary to SP-A mRNA. Detection was achieved by Anti-digoxigenin antibody conjugated to alkaline phosphatase with NBT/BCIP as a chromogen (400×).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2663539&req=5

Figure 3: In situ hybridization targeting using a 663 bp digoxigenated DNA-probe complementary to SP-A mRNA. Detection was achieved by Anti-digoxigenin antibody conjugated to alkaline phosphatase with NBT/BCIP as a chromogen (400×).

Mentions: It is evident that SP-A is a molecule which already proves to be an interesting subject for medical research. However, the studies concerning the possible role of surfactant-defects in pulmonary diseases of adults have been performed mainly in different cell culture or animal models hardly analyzing adult human lung tissue. For these reasons SP-A is a promising target for histomorphological approaches using pathological specimens which exactly represent the scenarios of various diseases with all the different cell types involved which are difficult to simulate in models. With the modern tools of molecular pathology, the genetic activities of genes can be analyzed in situ, which provides evidence of the cellular activities in the context of a human native tissue. One example is shown in Fig. 3: a lung section hybridized with a digoxigenin-labeled SP-A probe to analyze the transcriptional activity in situ; the reddish signals of the transcripts are visible in the cytoplasm of type II pneumocytes. When analyzing the expression of SP-A in histological sections in context with other molecules of the pulmonary cytokine network one can expect further clues for the scenarios taking place in the course of interstitial lung diseases.


On the significance of Surfactant Protein-A within the human lungs.

Goldmann T, Kähler D, Schultz H, Abdullah M, Lang DS, Stellmacher F, Vollmer E - Diagn Pathol (2009)

In situ hybridization targeting using a 663 bp digoxigenated DNA-probe complementary to SP-A mRNA. Detection was achieved by Anti-digoxigenin antibody conjugated to alkaline phosphatase with NBT/BCIP as a chromogen (400×).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2663539&req=5

Figure 3: In situ hybridization targeting using a 663 bp digoxigenated DNA-probe complementary to SP-A mRNA. Detection was achieved by Anti-digoxigenin antibody conjugated to alkaline phosphatase with NBT/BCIP as a chromogen (400×).
Mentions: It is evident that SP-A is a molecule which already proves to be an interesting subject for medical research. However, the studies concerning the possible role of surfactant-defects in pulmonary diseases of adults have been performed mainly in different cell culture or animal models hardly analyzing adult human lung tissue. For these reasons SP-A is a promising target for histomorphological approaches using pathological specimens which exactly represent the scenarios of various diseases with all the different cell types involved which are difficult to simulate in models. With the modern tools of molecular pathology, the genetic activities of genes can be analyzed in situ, which provides evidence of the cellular activities in the context of a human native tissue. One example is shown in Fig. 3: a lung section hybridized with a digoxigenin-labeled SP-A probe to analyze the transcriptional activity in situ; the reddish signals of the transcripts are visible in the cytoplasm of type II pneumocytes. When analyzing the expression of SP-A in histological sections in context with other molecules of the pulmonary cytokine network one can expect further clues for the scenarios taking place in the course of interstitial lung diseases.

Bottom Line: To date SP-A is recognized as a molecule essential for pulmonary development, structure and function.An upcoming number of reports deals with the role of SP-A for pulmonary pathology.This article gives an overview about the state of knowledge on SP-A focused in applications for human pulmonary disorders and points out the importance for pathology-orientated research approaches using immunohistochemistry or in situ hybridization as promising methods to further elucidate the role of this molecule in adult lung diseases.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Division for Clinical and Experimental Pathology, Research Center Borstel, Borstel, Germany. tgoldmann@fz-borstel.de

ABSTRACT
Surfactant Protein-A (SP-A) is the most prominent among four proteins in the pulmonary surfactant-system. SP-A is expressed by alveolar epithelial cells type II as well as by a portion of non small cell lung carcinomas (NSCLC).The expression of SP-A is complexly regulated on the transcriptional and the chromosomal level. SP-A is a major player in the pulmonary cytokine-network and moreover has been described to act in the pulmonary host defense.By the use of cell culture or animal models the functional properties have been repeatedly shown in many aspects, often bearing surprising properties which strongly indicate the physiological importance of SP-A. To date SP-A is recognized as a molecule essential for pulmonary development, structure and function. An upcoming number of reports deals with the role of SP-A for pulmonary pathology. This article gives an overview about the state of knowledge on SP-A focused in applications for human pulmonary disorders and points out the importance for pathology-orientated research approaches using immunohistochemistry or in situ hybridization as promising methods to further elucidate the role of this molecule in adult lung diseases.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus