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On the significance of Surfactant Protein-A within the human lungs.

Goldmann T, Kähler D, Schultz H, Abdullah M, Lang DS, Stellmacher F, Vollmer E - Diagn Pathol (2009)

Bottom Line: To date SP-A is recognized as a molecule essential for pulmonary development, structure and function.An upcoming number of reports deals with the role of SP-A for pulmonary pathology.This article gives an overview about the state of knowledge on SP-A focused in applications for human pulmonary disorders and points out the importance for pathology-orientated research approaches using immunohistochemistry or in situ hybridization as promising methods to further elucidate the role of this molecule in adult lung diseases.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Division for Clinical and Experimental Pathology, Research Center Borstel, Borstel, Germany. tgoldmann@fz-borstel.de

ABSTRACT
Surfactant Protein-A (SP-A) is the most prominent among four proteins in the pulmonary surfactant-system. SP-A is expressed by alveolar epithelial cells type II as well as by a portion of non small cell lung carcinomas (NSCLC).The expression of SP-A is complexly regulated on the transcriptional and the chromosomal level. SP-A is a major player in the pulmonary cytokine-network and moreover has been described to act in the pulmonary host defense.By the use of cell culture or animal models the functional properties have been repeatedly shown in many aspects, often bearing surprising properties which strongly indicate the physiological importance of SP-A. To date SP-A is recognized as a molecule essential for pulmonary development, structure and function. An upcoming number of reports deals with the role of SP-A for pulmonary pathology. This article gives an overview about the state of knowledge on SP-A focused in applications for human pulmonary disorders and points out the importance for pathology-orientated research approaches using immunohistochemistry or in situ hybridization as promising methods to further elucidate the role of this molecule in adult lung diseases.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Immunohistochemical detection of SP-A using the monoclonal antibody PE-10 (LSAB, amonoethylcarbazole, 400×).
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Figure 2: Immunohistochemical detection of SP-A using the monoclonal antibody PE-10 (LSAB, amonoethylcarbazole, 400×).

Mentions: Another point of research concerning SP-A is the diagnostic value of this molecule, the expression of which is restricted to the lungs. It has been reported that SP-A levels in BAL or serum from patients suffering from idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis correlate with the progression of the disease and can be used to predict survival [34,38]. In samples from airway secretions SP-A measurements are described to be useful also for the diagnostics of pulmonary edema where elevated levels have been found compared to healthy volunteers and ARDS patients [39]. By utilizing highly sensitive RT-PCR techniques the amplification of SP-A transcripts can be used for the detection of occult metastases in non small cell lung cancer patients [5,40]. Comparative studies of different malignomas with pulmonary localization have shown the diagnostic properties of immunohistochemically determined SP-A [6,41,42]. In carcinomas of occult origin localized in the lungs the diagnosis has a crucial influence on the therapy. A positive detection of SP-A represents a clear hint for a primary location in the lung [43]. Fig. 2 as an example shows the immunohistochemical detection of SP-A in a moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma of the lung using the primary monoclonal antibody PE-10 and LSAB (AEC-substrate, × 100). The positive staining in the tumor cells (reddish) in this certain case helped to manifest the diagnosis as a primary carcinoma of the lung.


On the significance of Surfactant Protein-A within the human lungs.

Goldmann T, Kähler D, Schultz H, Abdullah M, Lang DS, Stellmacher F, Vollmer E - Diagn Pathol (2009)

Immunohistochemical detection of SP-A using the monoclonal antibody PE-10 (LSAB, amonoethylcarbazole, 400×).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2663539&req=5

Figure 2: Immunohistochemical detection of SP-A using the monoclonal antibody PE-10 (LSAB, amonoethylcarbazole, 400×).
Mentions: Another point of research concerning SP-A is the diagnostic value of this molecule, the expression of which is restricted to the lungs. It has been reported that SP-A levels in BAL or serum from patients suffering from idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis correlate with the progression of the disease and can be used to predict survival [34,38]. In samples from airway secretions SP-A measurements are described to be useful also for the diagnostics of pulmonary edema where elevated levels have been found compared to healthy volunteers and ARDS patients [39]. By utilizing highly sensitive RT-PCR techniques the amplification of SP-A transcripts can be used for the detection of occult metastases in non small cell lung cancer patients [5,40]. Comparative studies of different malignomas with pulmonary localization have shown the diagnostic properties of immunohistochemically determined SP-A [6,41,42]. In carcinomas of occult origin localized in the lungs the diagnosis has a crucial influence on the therapy. A positive detection of SP-A represents a clear hint for a primary location in the lung [43]. Fig. 2 as an example shows the immunohistochemical detection of SP-A in a moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma of the lung using the primary monoclonal antibody PE-10 and LSAB (AEC-substrate, × 100). The positive staining in the tumor cells (reddish) in this certain case helped to manifest the diagnosis as a primary carcinoma of the lung.

Bottom Line: To date SP-A is recognized as a molecule essential for pulmonary development, structure and function.An upcoming number of reports deals with the role of SP-A for pulmonary pathology.This article gives an overview about the state of knowledge on SP-A focused in applications for human pulmonary disorders and points out the importance for pathology-orientated research approaches using immunohistochemistry or in situ hybridization as promising methods to further elucidate the role of this molecule in adult lung diseases.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Division for Clinical and Experimental Pathology, Research Center Borstel, Borstel, Germany. tgoldmann@fz-borstel.de

ABSTRACT
Surfactant Protein-A (SP-A) is the most prominent among four proteins in the pulmonary surfactant-system. SP-A is expressed by alveolar epithelial cells type II as well as by a portion of non small cell lung carcinomas (NSCLC).The expression of SP-A is complexly regulated on the transcriptional and the chromosomal level. SP-A is a major player in the pulmonary cytokine-network and moreover has been described to act in the pulmonary host defense.By the use of cell culture or animal models the functional properties have been repeatedly shown in many aspects, often bearing surprising properties which strongly indicate the physiological importance of SP-A. To date SP-A is recognized as a molecule essential for pulmonary development, structure and function. An upcoming number of reports deals with the role of SP-A for pulmonary pathology. This article gives an overview about the state of knowledge on SP-A focused in applications for human pulmonary disorders and points out the importance for pathology-orientated research approaches using immunohistochemistry or in situ hybridization as promising methods to further elucidate the role of this molecule in adult lung diseases.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus