Limits...
Face mask use and control of respiratory virus transmission in households.

MacIntyre CR, Cauchemez S, Dwyer DE, Seale H, Cheung P, Browne G, Fasher M, Wood J, Gao Z, Booy R, Ferguson N - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2009)

Bottom Line: We found that adherence to mask use significantly reduced the risk for ILI-associated infection, but <50% of participants wore masks most of the time.We concluded that household use of face masks is associated with low adherence and is ineffective for controlling seasonal respiratory disease.However, during a severe pandemic when use of face masks might be greater, pandemic transmission in households could be reduced.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: niversity of New South Wales School of Public Health and Community Medicine, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. r.macintyre@unsw.edu.au

ABSTRACT
Many countries are stockpiling face masks for use as a nonpharmaceutical intervention to control virus transmission during an influenza pandemic. We conducted a prospective cluster-randomized trial comparing surgical masks, non-fit-tested P2 masks, and no masks in prevention of influenza-like illness (ILI) in households. Mask use adherence was self-reported. During the 2006 and 2007 winter seasons, 286 exposed adults from 143 households who had been exposed to a child with clinical respiratory illness were recruited. We found that adherence to mask use significantly reduced the risk for ILI-associated infection, but <50% of participants wore masks most of the time. We concluded that household use of face masks is associated with low adherence and is ineffective for controlling seasonal respiratory disease. However, during a severe pandemic when use of face masks might be greater, pandemic transmission in households could be reduced.

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

Compliance with mask use by day over 5 consecutive days during the study, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia, 2006 and 2007 winter influenza seasons.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2662657&req=5

Figure 2: Compliance with mask use by day over 5 consecutive days during the study, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia, 2006 and 2007 winter influenza seasons.

Mentions: Characteristics of the adherent versus nonadherent participants who were recruited are shown in Table 2; no significant differences were noted between the 2 groups except for the presence of >3 adults in the household. On day 1 of mask use, 36 (38%) of the 94 surgical mask users and 42 (46%) of the 92 P2 mask users stated that they were wearing the mask “most or all” of the time. Other participants were wearing face masks rarely or never. The difference between the groups was not significant (p = 0.37). Adherence dropped to 29/94 (31%) and 23/92 (25%), respectively, by day 5 of mask use (Figure 2).


Face mask use and control of respiratory virus transmission in households.

MacIntyre CR, Cauchemez S, Dwyer DE, Seale H, Cheung P, Browne G, Fasher M, Wood J, Gao Z, Booy R, Ferguson N - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2009)

Compliance with mask use by day over 5 consecutive days during the study, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia, 2006 and 2007 winter influenza seasons.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2662657&req=5

Figure 2: Compliance with mask use by day over 5 consecutive days during the study, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia, 2006 and 2007 winter influenza seasons.
Mentions: Characteristics of the adherent versus nonadherent participants who were recruited are shown in Table 2; no significant differences were noted between the 2 groups except for the presence of >3 adults in the household. On day 1 of mask use, 36 (38%) of the 94 surgical mask users and 42 (46%) of the 92 P2 mask users stated that they were wearing the mask “most or all” of the time. Other participants were wearing face masks rarely or never. The difference between the groups was not significant (p = 0.37). Adherence dropped to 29/94 (31%) and 23/92 (25%), respectively, by day 5 of mask use (Figure 2).

Bottom Line: We found that adherence to mask use significantly reduced the risk for ILI-associated infection, but <50% of participants wore masks most of the time.We concluded that household use of face masks is associated with low adherence and is ineffective for controlling seasonal respiratory disease.However, during a severe pandemic when use of face masks might be greater, pandemic transmission in households could be reduced.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: niversity of New South Wales School of Public Health and Community Medicine, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. r.macintyre@unsw.edu.au

ABSTRACT
Many countries are stockpiling face masks for use as a nonpharmaceutical intervention to control virus transmission during an influenza pandemic. We conducted a prospective cluster-randomized trial comparing surgical masks, non-fit-tested P2 masks, and no masks in prevention of influenza-like illness (ILI) in households. Mask use adherence was self-reported. During the 2006 and 2007 winter seasons, 286 exposed adults from 143 households who had been exposed to a child with clinical respiratory illness were recruited. We found that adherence to mask use significantly reduced the risk for ILI-associated infection, but <50% of participants wore masks most of the time. We concluded that household use of face masks is associated with low adherence and is ineffective for controlling seasonal respiratory disease. However, during a severe pandemic when use of face masks might be greater, pandemic transmission in households could be reduced.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus