Limits...
Managing Requirement Volatility in an Ontology-Driven Clinical LIMS Using Category Theory.

Shaban-Nejad A, Ormandjieva O, Kassab M, Haarslev V - Int J Telemed Appl (2009)

Bottom Line: With advances in the health science, many features and functionalities need to be added to, or removed from, existing software applications in the biomedical domain.At the same time, the increasing complexity of biomedical systems makes them more difficult to understand, and consequently it is more difficult to define their requirements, which contributes considerably to their volatility.The proposed framework is empowered with ontologies and formalized using category theory to provide a deep and common understanding of the functional and nonfunctional requirement hierarchies and their interrelations, and to trace the effects of a change on the conceptual framework.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Computer Science and Software Engineering, Concordia University, 1455 de Maisonneuve Boulevard West, Montreal, QC, Canada H3G 1M8.

ABSTRACT
Requirement volatility is an issue in software engineering in general, and in Web-based clinical applications in particular, which often originates from an incomplete knowledge of the domain of interest. With advances in the health science, many features and functionalities need to be added to, or removed from, existing software applications in the biomedical domain. At the same time, the increasing complexity of biomedical systems makes them more difficult to understand, and consequently it is more difficult to define their requirements, which contributes considerably to their volatility. In this paper, we present a novel agent-based approach for analyzing and managing volatile and dynamic requirements in an ontology-driven laboratory information management system (LIMS) designed for Web-based case reporting in medical mycology. The proposed framework is empowered with ontologies and formalized using category theory to provide a deep and common understanding of the functional and nonfunctional requirement hierarchies and their interrelations, and to trace the effects of a change on the conceptual framework.

No MeSH data available.


Illustrationof MYCO-LIMS NFRs/FRs dependencies hierarchical model.
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fig6: Illustrationof MYCO-LIMS NFRs/FRs dependencies hierarchical model.

Mentions: For example, associating responsetime NFR to view order use case would indicate that the software must executethe functionality within an acceptable duration (see association A1, Figure 6). Another example is associating security NFR to the “manage order” FR, whichwould indicate that the interaction between user and the software system in the“manage order” service must be secured (see association A2, Figure 6), whichalso precisely implies that user interface for other interactions is notrequired to be secured.


Managing Requirement Volatility in an Ontology-Driven Clinical LIMS Using Category Theory.

Shaban-Nejad A, Ormandjieva O, Kassab M, Haarslev V - Int J Telemed Appl (2009)

Illustrationof MYCO-LIMS NFRs/FRs dependencies hierarchical model.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2662492&req=5

fig6: Illustrationof MYCO-LIMS NFRs/FRs dependencies hierarchical model.
Mentions: For example, associating responsetime NFR to view order use case would indicate that the software must executethe functionality within an acceptable duration (see association A1, Figure 6). Another example is associating security NFR to the “manage order” FR, whichwould indicate that the interaction between user and the software system in the“manage order” service must be secured (see association A2, Figure 6), whichalso precisely implies that user interface for other interactions is notrequired to be secured.

Bottom Line: With advances in the health science, many features and functionalities need to be added to, or removed from, existing software applications in the biomedical domain.At the same time, the increasing complexity of biomedical systems makes them more difficult to understand, and consequently it is more difficult to define their requirements, which contributes considerably to their volatility.The proposed framework is empowered with ontologies and formalized using category theory to provide a deep and common understanding of the functional and nonfunctional requirement hierarchies and their interrelations, and to trace the effects of a change on the conceptual framework.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Computer Science and Software Engineering, Concordia University, 1455 de Maisonneuve Boulevard West, Montreal, QC, Canada H3G 1M8.

ABSTRACT
Requirement volatility is an issue in software engineering in general, and in Web-based clinical applications in particular, which often originates from an incomplete knowledge of the domain of interest. With advances in the health science, many features and functionalities need to be added to, or removed from, existing software applications in the biomedical domain. At the same time, the increasing complexity of biomedical systems makes them more difficult to understand, and consequently it is more difficult to define their requirements, which contributes considerably to their volatility. In this paper, we present a novel agent-based approach for analyzing and managing volatile and dynamic requirements in an ontology-driven laboratory information management system (LIMS) designed for Web-based case reporting in medical mycology. The proposed framework is empowered with ontologies and formalized using category theory to provide a deep and common understanding of the functional and nonfunctional requirement hierarchies and their interrelations, and to trace the effects of a change on the conceptual framework.

No MeSH data available.