Limits...
Radiologic evaluation of small renal masses (I): pretreatment management.

Marhuenda A, Martín MI, Deltoro C, Santos J, Rubio Briones J - Adv Urol (2009)

Bottom Line: Is this a task for a urologist or a radiologist?It is obvious that in the increasing clinical scenario where this decision has to be made, both specialists ought to work together.Special emphasis has been placed on aspects regarding the bidirectional information between radiologists and urologists needed to achieve the best radiological approach to an SRM.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Departamento de Radiología, Instituto Valenciano de Oncología, C/Profesor Beltrán Báguena 8, 46009 Valencia, Spain. amarflu@gmail.com

ABSTRACT
When characterizing a small renal mass (SRM), the main question to be answered is whether the mass represents a surgical or nonsurgical lesion or, in some cases, if followup studies are a reasonable option. Is this a task for a urologist or a radiologist? It is obvious that in the increasing clinical scenario where this decision has to be made, both specialists ought to work together. This paper will focus on the principles, indications, and limitations of ultrasound, CT, and MRI to characterize an SRM in 2008 with a detailed review of relevant literature. Special emphasis has been placed on aspects regarding the bidirectional information between radiologists and urologists needed to achieve the best radiological approach to an SRM.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

(a) Coronal haste T2and (b) late postcontrast coronal T1 with fat saturation. Cystic lesion with anenhancing nodule on the caudal aspect of the kidney. Renal cell carcinoma wasfound at surgery.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2662406&req=5

fig16: (a) Coronal haste T2and (b) late postcontrast coronal T1 with fat saturation. Cystic lesion with anenhancing nodule on the caudal aspect of the kidney. Renal cell carcinoma wasfound at surgery.

Mentions: When a cystic mass is evaluated, MR imaging maydemonstrate definitive enhancement that shows only equivocal enhancement on CT. In a cystic lesion with only a small solid component, subtraction images mayagain be used to better assess the presence of enhancement [49]. Furthermore, even if detecting acalcification is a limitation on MR imaging, it is however an advantage todetermine whether enhancement is present in a heavily calcified cyst on CTgiven that it could be better appreciated [45]. The combination of muralirregularity and intense mural enhancement is a strong predictor of malignancyin renal cystic lesions (see Figure 16). However, the appearance of benign andmalignant lesions may overlap [72, 73].


Radiologic evaluation of small renal masses (I): pretreatment management.

Marhuenda A, Martín MI, Deltoro C, Santos J, Rubio Briones J - Adv Urol (2009)

(a) Coronal haste T2and (b) late postcontrast coronal T1 with fat saturation. Cystic lesion with anenhancing nodule on the caudal aspect of the kidney. Renal cell carcinoma wasfound at surgery.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2662406&req=5

fig16: (a) Coronal haste T2and (b) late postcontrast coronal T1 with fat saturation. Cystic lesion with anenhancing nodule on the caudal aspect of the kidney. Renal cell carcinoma wasfound at surgery.
Mentions: When a cystic mass is evaluated, MR imaging maydemonstrate definitive enhancement that shows only equivocal enhancement on CT. In a cystic lesion with only a small solid component, subtraction images mayagain be used to better assess the presence of enhancement [49]. Furthermore, even if detecting acalcification is a limitation on MR imaging, it is however an advantage todetermine whether enhancement is present in a heavily calcified cyst on CTgiven that it could be better appreciated [45]. The combination of muralirregularity and intense mural enhancement is a strong predictor of malignancyin renal cystic lesions (see Figure 16). However, the appearance of benign andmalignant lesions may overlap [72, 73].

Bottom Line: Is this a task for a urologist or a radiologist?It is obvious that in the increasing clinical scenario where this decision has to be made, both specialists ought to work together.Special emphasis has been placed on aspects regarding the bidirectional information between radiologists and urologists needed to achieve the best radiological approach to an SRM.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Departamento de Radiología, Instituto Valenciano de Oncología, C/Profesor Beltrán Báguena 8, 46009 Valencia, Spain. amarflu@gmail.com

ABSTRACT
When characterizing a small renal mass (SRM), the main question to be answered is whether the mass represents a surgical or nonsurgical lesion or, in some cases, if followup studies are a reasonable option. Is this a task for a urologist or a radiologist? It is obvious that in the increasing clinical scenario where this decision has to be made, both specialists ought to work together. This paper will focus on the principles, indications, and limitations of ultrasound, CT, and MRI to characterize an SRM in 2008 with a detailed review of relevant literature. Special emphasis has been placed on aspects regarding the bidirectional information between radiologists and urologists needed to achieve the best radiological approach to an SRM.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus