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Chronomics, human time estimation, and aging.

Halberg F, Sothern RB, Cornélissen G, Czaplicki J - Clin Interv Aging (2008)

Bottom Line: Cycles of a half-week, a week, approximately 30 days, a half-year and a year, in self-assessed 1-minute estimation by RBS between 25 and 60 years of age in health, are mapped for the first time, compared and opposite effects are found.Circadian and infradian rhythm mapping is essential for a scrutiny of effects of aging.A approximately 30-day and a circannual component apparent at 25 years of age are not found later; cycles longer than a year are detected.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Halberg Chronobiology Center, University of Minnesota, Campus Mail Code 8609-MMC 8609, 420 Delaware St. S.E., Minneapolis, MN 55455, USA. halbe001@umn.edu

ABSTRACT

Background: Circadian rhythm stage affects many outcomes, including those of mental aging.

Methods: Estimations of 1 minute approximately 5 times/day for a year, 25 years apart, by a healthy male biomedical scientist (RBS), are analyzed by the extended cosinor.

Results: Cycles of a half-week, a week, approximately 30 days, a half-year and a year, in self-assessed 1-minute estimation by RBS between 25 and 60 years of age in health, are mapped for the first time, compared and opposite effects are found. For RBS at 60 vs at 25 years of age, it takes less time in the morning around 10:30 (P < 0.001), but not in the evening around 19:30 (P = 0.956), to estimate 1 minute.

Discussion: During the intervening decades, the time of estimating 1 minute differed greatly, dependent on circadian stage, being a linear decrease in the morning and increase in the evening, the latter modulated by a -33.6-year cycle.

Conclusion: Circadian and infradian rhythm mapping is essential for a scrutiny of effects of aging. A approximately 30-day and a circannual component apparent at 25 years of age are not found later; cycles longer than a year are detected. Rhythm stages await tests as markers for timing therapy in disease.

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Sketch of the measurable time structure (chronome, of an environmental and/or biospheric variable) consisting of endpoints of rhythms, trends and deterministic chaos, resolvable as a function of the length and density of a time series, respectively, and any residual variation.
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f1-cia-3-749: Sketch of the measurable time structure (chronome, of an environmental and/or biospheric variable) consisting of endpoints of rhythms, trends and deterministic chaos, resolvable as a function of the length and density of a time series, respectively, and any residual variation.

Mentions: Chronomics, the study of time structures (Figure 1) attempts to resolve, as a function of the density and length of a time series, trends such as those with age, in the context of other elements of chronomes such as a broad spectrum of rhythms (Halberg et al 2003a) for which the length of the series is critical (and/or deterministic chaos, the resolution of which, in the broad chronomic context, depends on the density of the time series [Otsuka et al 1997; Burioka et al 2005], beyond our scope herein). We explore circadian and infradian rhythms in time estimation (TE), having shown that the stage of the former is essential for the assessment of the latter in the case of a half-year-long spectral component probably related to geomagnetics in human systolic blood pressure (SBP) (Tarquini et al 1997; Halberg et al 2001a; Cornélissen et al 2002; Sothern et al 2006). We here ask whether changes with age in a mental function, such as the TE of an 1-minute duration, also differ as a function of circadian stage. Our test of mental functioning for precisely timed action is performed inexpensively, without the need for bulky instrumentation beyond a stopwatch. The test is quick and easily repeated, and may also tell us whether and, if so, when one aspect of subjective time—one minute—may change with age. What is particularly important, the circadian components here mapped could serve as a marker for interventions, therapeutic or other.


Chronomics, human time estimation, and aging.

Halberg F, Sothern RB, Cornélissen G, Czaplicki J - Clin Interv Aging (2008)

Sketch of the measurable time structure (chronome, of an environmental and/or biospheric variable) consisting of endpoints of rhythms, trends and deterministic chaos, resolvable as a function of the length and density of a time series, respectively, and any residual variation.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2662403&req=5

f1-cia-3-749: Sketch of the measurable time structure (chronome, of an environmental and/or biospheric variable) consisting of endpoints of rhythms, trends and deterministic chaos, resolvable as a function of the length and density of a time series, respectively, and any residual variation.
Mentions: Chronomics, the study of time structures (Figure 1) attempts to resolve, as a function of the density and length of a time series, trends such as those with age, in the context of other elements of chronomes such as a broad spectrum of rhythms (Halberg et al 2003a) for which the length of the series is critical (and/or deterministic chaos, the resolution of which, in the broad chronomic context, depends on the density of the time series [Otsuka et al 1997; Burioka et al 2005], beyond our scope herein). We explore circadian and infradian rhythms in time estimation (TE), having shown that the stage of the former is essential for the assessment of the latter in the case of a half-year-long spectral component probably related to geomagnetics in human systolic blood pressure (SBP) (Tarquini et al 1997; Halberg et al 2001a; Cornélissen et al 2002; Sothern et al 2006). We here ask whether changes with age in a mental function, such as the TE of an 1-minute duration, also differ as a function of circadian stage. Our test of mental functioning for precisely timed action is performed inexpensively, without the need for bulky instrumentation beyond a stopwatch. The test is quick and easily repeated, and may also tell us whether and, if so, when one aspect of subjective time—one minute—may change with age. What is particularly important, the circadian components here mapped could serve as a marker for interventions, therapeutic or other.

Bottom Line: Cycles of a half-week, a week, approximately 30 days, a half-year and a year, in self-assessed 1-minute estimation by RBS between 25 and 60 years of age in health, are mapped for the first time, compared and opposite effects are found.Circadian and infradian rhythm mapping is essential for a scrutiny of effects of aging.A approximately 30-day and a circannual component apparent at 25 years of age are not found later; cycles longer than a year are detected.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Halberg Chronobiology Center, University of Minnesota, Campus Mail Code 8609-MMC 8609, 420 Delaware St. S.E., Minneapolis, MN 55455, USA. halbe001@umn.edu

ABSTRACT

Background: Circadian rhythm stage affects many outcomes, including those of mental aging.

Methods: Estimations of 1 minute approximately 5 times/day for a year, 25 years apart, by a healthy male biomedical scientist (RBS), are analyzed by the extended cosinor.

Results: Cycles of a half-week, a week, approximately 30 days, a half-year and a year, in self-assessed 1-minute estimation by RBS between 25 and 60 years of age in health, are mapped for the first time, compared and opposite effects are found. For RBS at 60 vs at 25 years of age, it takes less time in the morning around 10:30 (P < 0.001), but not in the evening around 19:30 (P = 0.956), to estimate 1 minute.

Discussion: During the intervening decades, the time of estimating 1 minute differed greatly, dependent on circadian stage, being a linear decrease in the morning and increase in the evening, the latter modulated by a -33.6-year cycle.

Conclusion: Circadian and infradian rhythm mapping is essential for a scrutiny of effects of aging. A approximately 30-day and a circannual component apparent at 25 years of age are not found later; cycles longer than a year are detected. Rhythm stages await tests as markers for timing therapy in disease.

Show MeSH