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The controversial clinicobiological role of breast cancer stem cells.

Casarsa C, Oriana S, Coradini D - J Oncol (2009)

Bottom Line: Breast cancer remains a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in women mainly because of the propensity of primary breast tumors to metastasize.However, despite the tremendous clinical potential of such cells and their possible therapeutic management, the real nature of CSCs remains to be elucidated.Starting from what is currently known about normal mammary stem/progenitor cells, to better define the cell that originates a tumor or is responsible for metastatic spread, this review will discuss experimental evidence of breast cancer stem cells and speculate about the clinical importance and implications of their evaluation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Experimental Oncology Laboratory, Senology Center, Ambrosiana Clinic, Cesano Boscone, 20090 Milano, Italy.

ABSTRACT
Breast cancer remains a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in women mainly because of the propensity of primary breast tumors to metastasize. Growing experimental evidence suggests that cancer stem cells (CSCs) may contribute to tumor progression and metastasis spread. However, despite the tremendous clinical potential of such cells and their possible therapeutic management, the real nature of CSCs remains to be elucidated. Starting from what is currently known about normal mammary stem/progenitor cells, to better define the cell that originates a tumor or is responsible for metastatic spread, this review will discuss experimental evidence of breast cancer stem cells and speculate about the clinical importance and implications of their evaluation.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Mixed model for the nature of sustained tumor growth. The tumor is originally driven by rare cellsof one phenotype (CSC1, yellow), which may have stem/progenitor cell origin andgive rise to the tumor bulk by producing terminally differentiated cells (blue). Subsequent mutations enhancing self-renewing capacity create a dominantsubclone that is phenotypically different (CSC2, green) and more aggressive. Ifthe CSC2 subclone does not display “stem-like” cell properties, such a subset willnot be able to initiate tumors with a high frequency [30].
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fig2: Mixed model for the nature of sustained tumor growth. The tumor is originally driven by rare cellsof one phenotype (CSC1, yellow), which may have stem/progenitor cell origin andgive rise to the tumor bulk by producing terminally differentiated cells (blue). Subsequent mutations enhancing self-renewing capacity create a dominantsubclone that is phenotypically different (CSC2, green) and more aggressive. Ifthe CSC2 subclone does not display “stem-like” cell properties, such a subset willnot be able to initiate tumors with a high frequency [30].

Mentions: A more intriguing model to explain thenature of sustained tumor growth is now emerging from the CSC model. According to this new model (Figure 2), tumors could originallybe driven by rare CSCs (CSC1). Subsequent mutations, enhancing self-renewingcapacity, could create a dominant, more aggressive subclone (CSC2), with a phenotypicalaspect distinct from the original CSC. However, if the CSC2 subclone does not display“stem-like” properties, it should not be able to initiate tumors with a highfrequency [46].


The controversial clinicobiological role of breast cancer stem cells.

Casarsa C, Oriana S, Coradini D - J Oncol (2009)

Mixed model for the nature of sustained tumor growth. The tumor is originally driven by rare cellsof one phenotype (CSC1, yellow), which may have stem/progenitor cell origin andgive rise to the tumor bulk by producing terminally differentiated cells (blue). Subsequent mutations enhancing self-renewing capacity create a dominantsubclone that is phenotypically different (CSC2, green) and more aggressive. Ifthe CSC2 subclone does not display “stem-like” cell properties, such a subset willnot be able to initiate tumors with a high frequency [30].
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2657953&req=5

fig2: Mixed model for the nature of sustained tumor growth. The tumor is originally driven by rare cellsof one phenotype (CSC1, yellow), which may have stem/progenitor cell origin andgive rise to the tumor bulk by producing terminally differentiated cells (blue). Subsequent mutations enhancing self-renewing capacity create a dominantsubclone that is phenotypically different (CSC2, green) and more aggressive. Ifthe CSC2 subclone does not display “stem-like” cell properties, such a subset willnot be able to initiate tumors with a high frequency [30].
Mentions: A more intriguing model to explain thenature of sustained tumor growth is now emerging from the CSC model. According to this new model (Figure 2), tumors could originallybe driven by rare CSCs (CSC1). Subsequent mutations, enhancing self-renewingcapacity, could create a dominant, more aggressive subclone (CSC2), with a phenotypicalaspect distinct from the original CSC. However, if the CSC2 subclone does not display“stem-like” properties, it should not be able to initiate tumors with a highfrequency [46].

Bottom Line: Breast cancer remains a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in women mainly because of the propensity of primary breast tumors to metastasize.However, despite the tremendous clinical potential of such cells and their possible therapeutic management, the real nature of CSCs remains to be elucidated.Starting from what is currently known about normal mammary stem/progenitor cells, to better define the cell that originates a tumor or is responsible for metastatic spread, this review will discuss experimental evidence of breast cancer stem cells and speculate about the clinical importance and implications of their evaluation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Experimental Oncology Laboratory, Senology Center, Ambrosiana Clinic, Cesano Boscone, 20090 Milano, Italy.

ABSTRACT
Breast cancer remains a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in women mainly because of the propensity of primary breast tumors to metastasize. Growing experimental evidence suggests that cancer stem cells (CSCs) may contribute to tumor progression and metastasis spread. However, despite the tremendous clinical potential of such cells and their possible therapeutic management, the real nature of CSCs remains to be elucidated. Starting from what is currently known about normal mammary stem/progenitor cells, to better define the cell that originates a tumor or is responsible for metastatic spread, this review will discuss experimental evidence of breast cancer stem cells and speculate about the clinical importance and implications of their evaluation.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus