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Afferent connections to the rostrolateral part of the periaqueductal gray: a critical region influencing the motivation drive to hunt and forage.

Mota-Ortiz SR, Sukikara MH, Felicio LF, Canteras NS - Neural Plast. (2009)

Bottom Line: Previous studies have shown that a particular site in the periaqueductal gray (PAG), the rostrolateral PAG, influences the motivation drive to forage or hunt.Moreover, the rlPAG also receives a wealth of information from different amygdalar, hypothalamic, and brainstem sites related to feeding, drinking, or hunting behavioral responses.Therefore, this unique combination of afferent connections puts the rlPAG in a privileged position to influence the motivation drive to choose whether hunting and foraging would be the most appropriate adaptive responses.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Laboratory of Neurosciences, City University of Sao Paulo, UNICID, Sao Paulo, Brazil. sandra.ortiz@ig.com.br

ABSTRACT
Previous studies have shown that a particular site in the periaqueductal gray (PAG), the rostrolateral PAG, influences the motivation drive to forage or hunt. To have a deeper understanding on the putative paths involved in the decision-making process between foraging, hunting, and other behavioral responses, in the present investigation, we carried out a systematic analysis of the neural inputs to the rostrolateral PAG (rlPAG), using Fluorogold as a retrograde tracer. According to the present findings, the rlPAG appears to be importantly driven by medial prefrontal cortical areas involved in controlling attention-related and decision-making processes. Moreover, the rlPAG also receives a wealth of information from different amygdalar, hypothalamic, and brainstem sites related to feeding, drinking, or hunting behavioral responses. Therefore, this unique combination of afferent connections puts the rlPAG in a privileged position to influence the motivation drive to choose whether hunting and foraging would be the most appropriate adaptive responses.

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Dark field photomicrographs showing (a) the distribution of retrogradelylabeled cells within the ipsilateral medial part of the central nucleus of theamygdala; (b) the median preoptic nucleus; (c) theanterior part of the anterior hypothalamic nucleus and the retinoceptive regionof the lateral hypothalamic area; (d)and the anterior part of the ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus and theretrochiasmatic area. Scale bars = 200 μm.
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fig4: Dark field photomicrographs showing (a) the distribution of retrogradelylabeled cells within the ipsilateral medial part of the central nucleus of theamygdala; (b) the median preoptic nucleus; (c) theanterior part of the anterior hypothalamic nucleus and the retinoceptive regionof the lateral hypothalamic area; (d)and the anterior part of the ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus and theretrochiasmatic area. Scale bars = 200 μm.

Mentions: In the lateral septal nucleus, a relatively sparse number of marked cells were observedin the rostral part of the nucleus, distributed mainly through the dorsalregion of the ventrolateral zone (Figures 2(b), 2(c)). In the septal region, wehave also observed a substantial number of retrogradely marked neurons in theposterior division of the bed nuclei of the stria terminalis, particularly inthe interfascicular nucleus, and also, to a lesser degree, in the transversenucleus (Figures 2(e), 2(f)). In the amygdala, a large number of retrogradelylabeled cells were found to be restricted to the medial part of the central amygdalar nucleus (Figures2(g), 2(h), 2(i), and 4(a)).


Afferent connections to the rostrolateral part of the periaqueductal gray: a critical region influencing the motivation drive to hunt and forage.

Mota-Ortiz SR, Sukikara MH, Felicio LF, Canteras NS - Neural Plast. (2009)

Dark field photomicrographs showing (a) the distribution of retrogradelylabeled cells within the ipsilateral medial part of the central nucleus of theamygdala; (b) the median preoptic nucleus; (c) theanterior part of the anterior hypothalamic nucleus and the retinoceptive regionof the lateral hypothalamic area; (d)and the anterior part of the ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus and theretrochiasmatic area. Scale bars = 200 μm.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2657915&req=5

fig4: Dark field photomicrographs showing (a) the distribution of retrogradelylabeled cells within the ipsilateral medial part of the central nucleus of theamygdala; (b) the median preoptic nucleus; (c) theanterior part of the anterior hypothalamic nucleus and the retinoceptive regionof the lateral hypothalamic area; (d)and the anterior part of the ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus and theretrochiasmatic area. Scale bars = 200 μm.
Mentions: In the lateral septal nucleus, a relatively sparse number of marked cells were observedin the rostral part of the nucleus, distributed mainly through the dorsalregion of the ventrolateral zone (Figures 2(b), 2(c)). In the septal region, wehave also observed a substantial number of retrogradely marked neurons in theposterior division of the bed nuclei of the stria terminalis, particularly inthe interfascicular nucleus, and also, to a lesser degree, in the transversenucleus (Figures 2(e), 2(f)). In the amygdala, a large number of retrogradelylabeled cells were found to be restricted to the medial part of the central amygdalar nucleus (Figures2(g), 2(h), 2(i), and 4(a)).

Bottom Line: Previous studies have shown that a particular site in the periaqueductal gray (PAG), the rostrolateral PAG, influences the motivation drive to forage or hunt.Moreover, the rlPAG also receives a wealth of information from different amygdalar, hypothalamic, and brainstem sites related to feeding, drinking, or hunting behavioral responses.Therefore, this unique combination of afferent connections puts the rlPAG in a privileged position to influence the motivation drive to choose whether hunting and foraging would be the most appropriate adaptive responses.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Laboratory of Neurosciences, City University of Sao Paulo, UNICID, Sao Paulo, Brazil. sandra.ortiz@ig.com.br

ABSTRACT
Previous studies have shown that a particular site in the periaqueductal gray (PAG), the rostrolateral PAG, influences the motivation drive to forage or hunt. To have a deeper understanding on the putative paths involved in the decision-making process between foraging, hunting, and other behavioral responses, in the present investigation, we carried out a systematic analysis of the neural inputs to the rostrolateral PAG (rlPAG), using Fluorogold as a retrograde tracer. According to the present findings, the rlPAG appears to be importantly driven by medial prefrontal cortical areas involved in controlling attention-related and decision-making processes. Moreover, the rlPAG also receives a wealth of information from different amygdalar, hypothalamic, and brainstem sites related to feeding, drinking, or hunting behavioral responses. Therefore, this unique combination of afferent connections puts the rlPAG in a privileged position to influence the motivation drive to choose whether hunting and foraging would be the most appropriate adaptive responses.

Show MeSH