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Five QTL hotspots for yield in short rotation coppice bioenergy poplar: the Poplar Biomass Loci.

Rae AM, Street NR, Robinson KM, Harris N, Taylor G - BMC Plant Biol. (2009)

Bottom Line: To achieve this, the maximum potential yield per hectare is a key target for improvement.In total 20% of the variation in final harvest biomass yield was explained by mapped QTL.We also investigated the genetic correlations between yield related traits to identify 'early diagnostic' indicators of yield showing that early biomass was a reasonable predictor of coppice yield and that leaf size, cell number and stem and sylleptic branch number were also valuable traits.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Biological Sciences, University of Southampton, Bassett Crescent East, Southampton, UK. amr502@york.ac.uk

ABSTRACT

Background: Concern over land use for non-food bioenergy crops requires breeding programmes that focus on producing biomass on the minimum amount of land that is economically-viable. To achieve this, the maximum potential yield per hectare is a key target for improvement. For long lived tree species, such as poplar, this requires an understanding of the traits that contribute to biomass production and their genetic control. An important aspect of this for long lived plants is an understanding of genetic interactions at different developmental stages, i.e. how genes or genetic regions impact on yield over time.

Results: QTL mapping identified regions of genetic control for biomass yield. We mapped consistent QTL across multiple coppice cycles and identified five robust QTL hotspots on linkage groups III, IV, X, XIV and XIX, calling these 'Poplar Biomass Loci' (PBL 1-5). In total 20% of the variation in final harvest biomass yield was explained by mapped QTL. We also investigated the genetic correlations between yield related traits to identify 'early diagnostic' indicators of yield showing that early biomass was a reasonable predictor of coppice yield and that leaf size, cell number and stem and sylleptic branch number were also valuable traits.

Conclusion: These findings provide insight into the genetic control of biomass production and correlation to 'early diagnostic' traits determining yield in poplar SRC for bioenergy. QTL hotspots serve as useful targets for directed breeding for improved biomass productivity that may also be relevant across additional poplar hybrids.

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Experimental overview. Diagramatic representation of the planting and copice cycle timeline.
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Figure 1: Experimental overview. Diagramatic representation of the planting and copice cycle timeline.

Mentions: We have previously reported heritability values and a multivariate analysis of trait contributions to biomass yield for coppice cycle 1 (CC1. See Table 1 and [6]. See [12] for details of Leaf Plastochron Index.). The data in [6] are represented here as SS (Single Stem equivalent to days after planting, DAP) and CC1 (Coppice Cycle 1 equivalent to days after coppice, DAC). Here we present the results of QTL analysis for the data presented in [6] with the addition of a final biomass harvest following an extra coppice cycle of 4 years (CC2). An overview of the coppice cycle is shown in Figure 1.


Five QTL hotspots for yield in short rotation coppice bioenergy poplar: the Poplar Biomass Loci.

Rae AM, Street NR, Robinson KM, Harris N, Taylor G - BMC Plant Biol. (2009)

Experimental overview. Diagramatic representation of the planting and copice cycle timeline.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2657785&req=5

Figure 1: Experimental overview. Diagramatic representation of the planting and copice cycle timeline.
Mentions: We have previously reported heritability values and a multivariate analysis of trait contributions to biomass yield for coppice cycle 1 (CC1. See Table 1 and [6]. See [12] for details of Leaf Plastochron Index.). The data in [6] are represented here as SS (Single Stem equivalent to days after planting, DAP) and CC1 (Coppice Cycle 1 equivalent to days after coppice, DAC). Here we present the results of QTL analysis for the data presented in [6] with the addition of a final biomass harvest following an extra coppice cycle of 4 years (CC2). An overview of the coppice cycle is shown in Figure 1.

Bottom Line: To achieve this, the maximum potential yield per hectare is a key target for improvement.In total 20% of the variation in final harvest biomass yield was explained by mapped QTL.We also investigated the genetic correlations between yield related traits to identify 'early diagnostic' indicators of yield showing that early biomass was a reasonable predictor of coppice yield and that leaf size, cell number and stem and sylleptic branch number were also valuable traits.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Biological Sciences, University of Southampton, Bassett Crescent East, Southampton, UK. amr502@york.ac.uk

ABSTRACT

Background: Concern over land use for non-food bioenergy crops requires breeding programmes that focus on producing biomass on the minimum amount of land that is economically-viable. To achieve this, the maximum potential yield per hectare is a key target for improvement. For long lived tree species, such as poplar, this requires an understanding of the traits that contribute to biomass production and their genetic control. An important aspect of this for long lived plants is an understanding of genetic interactions at different developmental stages, i.e. how genes or genetic regions impact on yield over time.

Results: QTL mapping identified regions of genetic control for biomass yield. We mapped consistent QTL across multiple coppice cycles and identified five robust QTL hotspots on linkage groups III, IV, X, XIV and XIX, calling these 'Poplar Biomass Loci' (PBL 1-5). In total 20% of the variation in final harvest biomass yield was explained by mapped QTL. We also investigated the genetic correlations between yield related traits to identify 'early diagnostic' indicators of yield showing that early biomass was a reasonable predictor of coppice yield and that leaf size, cell number and stem and sylleptic branch number were also valuable traits.

Conclusion: These findings provide insight into the genetic control of biomass production and correlation to 'early diagnostic' traits determining yield in poplar SRC for bioenergy. QTL hotspots serve as useful targets for directed breeding for improved biomass productivity that may also be relevant across additional poplar hybrids.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus