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Characteristics of 263K scrapie agent in multiple hamster species.

Meade-White KD, Barbian KD, Race B, Favara C, Gardner D, Taubner L, Porcella S, Race R - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2009)

Bottom Line: Transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE) diseases are known to cross species barriers, but the pathologic and biochemical changes that occur during transmission are not well understood.To better understand these changes, we infected 6 hamster species with 263K hamster scrapie strain and, after each of 3 successive passages in the new species, analyzed abnormal proteinase K (PK)-resistant prion protein (PrPres) glycoform ratios, PrPres PK sensitivity, incubation periods, and lesion profiles.Furthermore, 2 polymorphic regions of the prion protein amino acid sequence correlated with profile differences in these TSE-infected hamster species.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, Hamilton, Montana, USA. kmeade-white@niaid.nih.gov

ABSTRACT
Transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE) diseases are known to cross species barriers, but the pathologic and biochemical changes that occur during transmission are not well understood. To better understand these changes, we infected 6 hamster species with 263K hamster scrapie strain and, after each of 3 successive passages in the new species, analyzed abnormal proteinase K (PK)-resistant prion protein (PrPres) glycoform ratios, PrPres PK sensitivity, incubation periods, and lesion profiles. Unique 263K molecular and biochemical profiles evolved in each of the infected hamster species. Characteristics of 263K in the new hamster species seemed to correlate best with host factors rather than agent strain. Furthermore, 2 polymorphic regions of the prion protein amino acid sequence correlated with profile differences in these TSE-infected hamster species.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Taxonomic classification for 6 hamster species. Phylogenetically, these species are grouped into closely related taxonomic genera (9).
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Figure 1: Taxonomic classification for 6 hamster species. Phylogenetically, these species are grouped into closely related taxonomic genera (9).

Mentions: Phylogenetic classification of these hamster subspecies is based on DNA sequences of mitochondrial cytochrome b gene and a portion of the NADH dehydrogenase 4 gene (9). These 6 species diverge into 3 genera, mainly Cricetulus (including Armenian and Chinese), Phodopus (including Djungarian and Siberian), and Mesocricetus (including Turkish and Syrian) hamster species (Figure 1). By inoculating each of these hamster species with a well-characterized, stable strain of Syrian hamster scrapie (263K), we were able to compare and analyze molecular and biochemical parameters of cross-species transmission events. To identify the cross-species transmission event, we looked for recognizable features that may have emerged in the new host. We found that each new host species presented a profile unlike that of the original Syrian hamster host infected with 263K. These profile changes correlated with unique PrP amino acid sequences within the 6 hamster species. This finding suggests that host PrP sequences can change the phenotype presentation of the agent in the host and could thereby confound identification of cross-species transmission events.


Characteristics of 263K scrapie agent in multiple hamster species.

Meade-White KD, Barbian KD, Race B, Favara C, Gardner D, Taubner L, Porcella S, Race R - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2009)

Taxonomic classification for 6 hamster species. Phylogenetically, these species are grouped into closely related taxonomic genera (9).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2657641&req=5

Figure 1: Taxonomic classification for 6 hamster species. Phylogenetically, these species are grouped into closely related taxonomic genera (9).
Mentions: Phylogenetic classification of these hamster subspecies is based on DNA sequences of mitochondrial cytochrome b gene and a portion of the NADH dehydrogenase 4 gene (9). These 6 species diverge into 3 genera, mainly Cricetulus (including Armenian and Chinese), Phodopus (including Djungarian and Siberian), and Mesocricetus (including Turkish and Syrian) hamster species (Figure 1). By inoculating each of these hamster species with a well-characterized, stable strain of Syrian hamster scrapie (263K), we were able to compare and analyze molecular and biochemical parameters of cross-species transmission events. To identify the cross-species transmission event, we looked for recognizable features that may have emerged in the new host. We found that each new host species presented a profile unlike that of the original Syrian hamster host infected with 263K. These profile changes correlated with unique PrP amino acid sequences within the 6 hamster species. This finding suggests that host PrP sequences can change the phenotype presentation of the agent in the host and could thereby confound identification of cross-species transmission events.

Bottom Line: Transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE) diseases are known to cross species barriers, but the pathologic and biochemical changes that occur during transmission are not well understood.To better understand these changes, we infected 6 hamster species with 263K hamster scrapie strain and, after each of 3 successive passages in the new species, analyzed abnormal proteinase K (PK)-resistant prion protein (PrPres) glycoform ratios, PrPres PK sensitivity, incubation periods, and lesion profiles.Furthermore, 2 polymorphic regions of the prion protein amino acid sequence correlated with profile differences in these TSE-infected hamster species.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, Hamilton, Montana, USA. kmeade-white@niaid.nih.gov

ABSTRACT
Transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE) diseases are known to cross species barriers, but the pathologic and biochemical changes that occur during transmission are not well understood. To better understand these changes, we infected 6 hamster species with 263K hamster scrapie strain and, after each of 3 successive passages in the new species, analyzed abnormal proteinase K (PK)-resistant prion protein (PrPres) glycoform ratios, PrPres PK sensitivity, incubation periods, and lesion profiles. Unique 263K molecular and biochemical profiles evolved in each of the infected hamster species. Characteristics of 263K in the new hamster species seemed to correlate best with host factors rather than agent strain. Furthermore, 2 polymorphic regions of the prion protein amino acid sequence correlated with profile differences in these TSE-infected hamster species.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus