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Imported malaria in children in industrialized countries, 1992-2002.

Stäger K, Legros F, Krause G, Low N, Bradley D, Desai M, Graf S, D'Amato S, Mizuno Y, Janzon R, Petersen E, Kester J, Steffen R, Schlagenhauf P - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2009)

Bottom Line: Children account for an appreciable proportion of total imported malaria cases, yet few studies have quantified these cases, identified trends, or suggested evidence-based prevention strategies for this group of travelers.We analyzed retrospective data from Australia, Denmark, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, the Netherlands, Sweden, Switzerland, the United Kingdom, and the United States and data provided by the United Nations World Tourism Organization.Returning to country of origin to visit friends and relatives was a risk factor.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland.

ABSTRACT
Children account for an appreciable proportion of total imported malaria cases, yet few studies have quantified these cases, identified trends, or suggested evidence-based prevention strategies for this group of travelers. We therefore sought to identify numbers of cases and deaths, Plasmodium species, place of malaria acquisition, preventive measures used, and national origin of malaria in children. We analyzed retrospective data from Australia, Denmark, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, the Netherlands, Sweden, Switzerland, the United Kingdom, and the United States and data provided by the United Nations World Tourism Organization. During 1992-2002, >17,000 cases of imported malaria in children were reported in 11 countries where malaria is not endemic; most (>70%) had been acquired in Africa. Returning to country of origin to visit friends and relatives was a risk factor. Malaria prevention for children should be a responsibility of healthcare providers and should be subsidized for low-income travelers to high-risk areas.

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Country of origin of 12,214 children with imported malaria in 6 industrialized countries, 1992–2002.
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Figure 1: Country of origin of 12,214 children with imported malaria in 6 industrialized countries, 1992–2002.

Mentions: Nationality and ethnicity posed logistical problems for data analysis. In the absence of data on “reason for travel,” we assumed that ethnicity represented the group who traveled to visit friends and relatives in their native country, which might not necessarily be true for countries such as the United States. The Figure shows the origin of the malaria patients rather than nationality, for which data are unavailable or unreliable. Information concerning the use of chemoprophylaxis is collected infrequently, if at all.


Imported malaria in children in industrialized countries, 1992-2002.

Stäger K, Legros F, Krause G, Low N, Bradley D, Desai M, Graf S, D'Amato S, Mizuno Y, Janzon R, Petersen E, Kester J, Steffen R, Schlagenhauf P - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2009)

Country of origin of 12,214 children with imported malaria in 6 industrialized countries, 1992–2002.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2657617&req=5

Figure 1: Country of origin of 12,214 children with imported malaria in 6 industrialized countries, 1992–2002.
Mentions: Nationality and ethnicity posed logistical problems for data analysis. In the absence of data on “reason for travel,” we assumed that ethnicity represented the group who traveled to visit friends and relatives in their native country, which might not necessarily be true for countries such as the United States. The Figure shows the origin of the malaria patients rather than nationality, for which data are unavailable or unreliable. Information concerning the use of chemoprophylaxis is collected infrequently, if at all.

Bottom Line: Children account for an appreciable proportion of total imported malaria cases, yet few studies have quantified these cases, identified trends, or suggested evidence-based prevention strategies for this group of travelers.We analyzed retrospective data from Australia, Denmark, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, the Netherlands, Sweden, Switzerland, the United Kingdom, and the United States and data provided by the United Nations World Tourism Organization.Returning to country of origin to visit friends and relatives was a risk factor.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland.

ABSTRACT
Children account for an appreciable proportion of total imported malaria cases, yet few studies have quantified these cases, identified trends, or suggested evidence-based prevention strategies for this group of travelers. We therefore sought to identify numbers of cases and deaths, Plasmodium species, place of malaria acquisition, preventive measures used, and national origin of malaria in children. We analyzed retrospective data from Australia, Denmark, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, the Netherlands, Sweden, Switzerland, the United Kingdom, and the United States and data provided by the United Nations World Tourism Organization. During 1992-2002, >17,000 cases of imported malaria in children were reported in 11 countries where malaria is not endemic; most (>70%) had been acquired in Africa. Returning to country of origin to visit friends and relatives was a risk factor. Malaria prevention for children should be a responsibility of healthcare providers and should be subsidized for low-income travelers to high-risk areas.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus