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European bat Lyssavirus transmission among cats, Europe.

Dacheux L, Larrous F, Mailles A, Boisseleau D, Delmas O, Biron C, Bouchier C, Capek I, Muller M, Ilari F, Lefranc T, Raffi F, Goudal M, Bourhy H - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2009)

Bottom Line: We identified 2 cases of European bat lyssavirus subtype 1 transmission to domestic carnivores (cats) in France.Bat-to-cat transmission is suspected.Low amounts of virus antigen in cat brain made diagnosis difficult.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institut Pasteur, Paris, France. laurent.dacheux@pasteur.fr

ABSTRACT
We identified 2 cases of European bat lyssavirus subtype 1 transmission to domestic carnivores (cats) in France. Bat-to-cat transmission is suspected. Low amounts of virus antigen in cat brain made diagnosis difficult.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Distribution of cats analyzed during 2004–2007 and of bats found positive for European bat lyssavirus (EBLV) in France during 1989–2007. Distribution of 1,506 cats tested during 2004–2007 by direct immunofluorescence antibody test, rabies tissue culture infection test, and an antigen-capture ELISA is given by district. Precise location of the 2 infected index (positive) cats and positive bats (n = 32) are indicated by circles and triangles, respectively, and associated with numbers 1, 2, 3, and 4 for isolates 03011FRA, 03002FRA, 07240FRA, and 08120FRA, respectively. EBLV-1a and EBLV-1b isolates are indicated in black and white, respectively. Map was constructed by using Articque’s C&D software (www.articque.com) and published according to Articque's publication policy.
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Figure 2: Distribution of cats analyzed during 2004–2007 and of bats found positive for European bat lyssavirus (EBLV) in France during 1989–2007. Distribution of 1,506 cats tested during 2004–2007 by direct immunofluorescence antibody test, rabies tissue culture infection test, and an antigen-capture ELISA is given by district. Precise location of the 2 infected index (positive) cats and positive bats (n = 32) are indicated by circles and triangles, respectively, and associated with numbers 1, 2, 3, and 4 for isolates 03011FRA, 03002FRA, 07240FRA, and 08120FRA, respectively. EBLV-1a and EBLV-1b isolates are indicated in black and white, respectively. Map was constructed by using Articque’s C&D software (www.articque.com) and published according to Articque's publication policy.

Mentions: At the Institut Pasteur during 1997–2007, a total of 6,097 cats suspected of having rabies and originating from all districts in France showed negative results for rabies by 2 recommended techniques (FAT and RTCIT). Among them, all animals tested since 2004 (1,506 cats), except cats no. 1 and no. 2, were also negative for rabies by WELYSSA (Figure 2), which suggests that transmission of EBLVs from bats to cats, although possible, is rare. Furthermore, terrestrial mammals seem to represent dead-end hosts for EBLVs, as suggested by results of experimental EBLV inoculations in several mammals such as cats, dogs, ferrets, mice, red foxes, or sheep (6,7,14). These animals are susceptible to infection with EBLVs but seem unlikely to actively transmit EBLVs to a new host.


European bat Lyssavirus transmission among cats, Europe.

Dacheux L, Larrous F, Mailles A, Boisseleau D, Delmas O, Biron C, Bouchier C, Capek I, Muller M, Ilari F, Lefranc T, Raffi F, Goudal M, Bourhy H - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2009)

Distribution of cats analyzed during 2004–2007 and of bats found positive for European bat lyssavirus (EBLV) in France during 1989–2007. Distribution of 1,506 cats tested during 2004–2007 by direct immunofluorescence antibody test, rabies tissue culture infection test, and an antigen-capture ELISA is given by district. Precise location of the 2 infected index (positive) cats and positive bats (n = 32) are indicated by circles and triangles, respectively, and associated with numbers 1, 2, 3, and 4 for isolates 03011FRA, 03002FRA, 07240FRA, and 08120FRA, respectively. EBLV-1a and EBLV-1b isolates are indicated in black and white, respectively. Map was constructed by using Articque’s C&D software (www.articque.com) and published according to Articque's publication policy.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2657616&req=5

Figure 2: Distribution of cats analyzed during 2004–2007 and of bats found positive for European bat lyssavirus (EBLV) in France during 1989–2007. Distribution of 1,506 cats tested during 2004–2007 by direct immunofluorescence antibody test, rabies tissue culture infection test, and an antigen-capture ELISA is given by district. Precise location of the 2 infected index (positive) cats and positive bats (n = 32) are indicated by circles and triangles, respectively, and associated with numbers 1, 2, 3, and 4 for isolates 03011FRA, 03002FRA, 07240FRA, and 08120FRA, respectively. EBLV-1a and EBLV-1b isolates are indicated in black and white, respectively. Map was constructed by using Articque’s C&D software (www.articque.com) and published according to Articque's publication policy.
Mentions: At the Institut Pasteur during 1997–2007, a total of 6,097 cats suspected of having rabies and originating from all districts in France showed negative results for rabies by 2 recommended techniques (FAT and RTCIT). Among them, all animals tested since 2004 (1,506 cats), except cats no. 1 and no. 2, were also negative for rabies by WELYSSA (Figure 2), which suggests that transmission of EBLVs from bats to cats, although possible, is rare. Furthermore, terrestrial mammals seem to represent dead-end hosts for EBLVs, as suggested by results of experimental EBLV inoculations in several mammals such as cats, dogs, ferrets, mice, red foxes, or sheep (6,7,14). These animals are susceptible to infection with EBLVs but seem unlikely to actively transmit EBLVs to a new host.

Bottom Line: We identified 2 cases of European bat lyssavirus subtype 1 transmission to domestic carnivores (cats) in France.Bat-to-cat transmission is suspected.Low amounts of virus antigen in cat brain made diagnosis difficult.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institut Pasteur, Paris, France. laurent.dacheux@pasteur.fr

ABSTRACT
We identified 2 cases of European bat lyssavirus subtype 1 transmission to domestic carnivores (cats) in France. Bat-to-cat transmission is suspected. Low amounts of virus antigen in cat brain made diagnosis difficult.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus