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VATA-m: Visual-Analogue Test assessing Anosognosia for motor impairment.

Della Sala S, Cocchini G, Beschin N, Cameron A - Clin Neuropsychol (2009)

Bottom Line: Both interviews and questionnaires can provide valuable information, but they rely heavily on self-evaluation and language, and are therefore prone to bias and pose more difficulty in the assessment of aphasic patients.The VATA-m is a questionnaire that compares a patient's self-evaluation with a caregivers' evaluation of the patient's abilities on a series of motor tasks.In addition, the test overcomes some of the limitations of the existing structured interviews and questionnaires, by enhancing reliability, improving data interpretation and diagnosis, and enabling assessment of patients with aphasia.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Human Cognitive Neuroscience, Psychology, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK. sergio@ed.ac.uk

ABSTRACT
There has been a growing interest in anosognosia in both clinical and research domains, yet relatively little attention has been paid to methods for evaluating it. Usually, the presence and severity of anosognosia is assessed by means of structured interviews or questionnaires. Both interviews and questionnaires can provide valuable information, but they rely heavily on self-evaluation and language, and are therefore prone to bias and pose more difficulty in the assessment of aphasic patients. The aim of this study was to develop a new tool, the VATA-m (Visual-Analogue Test for Anosognosia for motor impairment), to assess explicit anosognosia for motor impairments. The VATA-m is a questionnaire that compares a patient's self-evaluation with a caregivers' evaluation of the patient's abilities on a series of motor tasks. In addition, the test overcomes some of the limitations of the existing structured interviews and questionnaires, by enhancing reliability, improving data interpretation and diagnosis, and enabling assessment of patients with aphasia.

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Examples of VATAm questions and the visual analogue scale.
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Figure 1: Examples of VATAm questions and the visual analogue scale.

Mentions: Pilot study. A series of 17 pictures were presented to a group of five healthy volunteers who were recruited from members of staff. The pictures illustrated simple motor tasks (e.g., jumping, walking, clapping, waving etc.). The volunteers were asked to name the motor tasks that were depicted. If the motor task was not correctly or clearly identified by at least four out of five participants, the picture was amended in accordance with the volunteers’ feedback. The amended versions of the pictures were presented to a new group of five healthy volunteers and to three aphasic patients who had motor impairment. They all correctly identified all the items. The people with aphasia were also asked to rate their motor difficulties on a 4-point visual-analogue scale. A score of 0 indicated “no difficulty in carrying out the task,” and a score of 3 indicated “major difficulties or impossibility in carrying out the task.” Scores between 0 and 3 were displayed along the scale, with written labels “no problem” and “problems” at the extremities, together with a smiling or non-smiling face to aid comprehension (see Figure 1d later). The patients could respond verbally (e.g., rating “3” or “Problem”) or non-verbally (i.e., pointing to the scale). The three patients had no difficulty in using this rating scale.


VATA-m: Visual-Analogue Test assessing Anosognosia for motor impairment.

Della Sala S, Cocchini G, Beschin N, Cameron A - Clin Neuropsychol (2009)

Examples of VATAm questions and the visual analogue scale.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2657325&req=5

Figure 1: Examples of VATAm questions and the visual analogue scale.
Mentions: Pilot study. A series of 17 pictures were presented to a group of five healthy volunteers who were recruited from members of staff. The pictures illustrated simple motor tasks (e.g., jumping, walking, clapping, waving etc.). The volunteers were asked to name the motor tasks that were depicted. If the motor task was not correctly or clearly identified by at least four out of five participants, the picture was amended in accordance with the volunteers’ feedback. The amended versions of the pictures were presented to a new group of five healthy volunteers and to three aphasic patients who had motor impairment. They all correctly identified all the items. The people with aphasia were also asked to rate their motor difficulties on a 4-point visual-analogue scale. A score of 0 indicated “no difficulty in carrying out the task,” and a score of 3 indicated “major difficulties or impossibility in carrying out the task.” Scores between 0 and 3 were displayed along the scale, with written labels “no problem” and “problems” at the extremities, together with a smiling or non-smiling face to aid comprehension (see Figure 1d later). The patients could respond verbally (e.g., rating “3” or “Problem”) or non-verbally (i.e., pointing to the scale). The three patients had no difficulty in using this rating scale.

Bottom Line: Both interviews and questionnaires can provide valuable information, but they rely heavily on self-evaluation and language, and are therefore prone to bias and pose more difficulty in the assessment of aphasic patients.The VATA-m is a questionnaire that compares a patient's self-evaluation with a caregivers' evaluation of the patient's abilities on a series of motor tasks.In addition, the test overcomes some of the limitations of the existing structured interviews and questionnaires, by enhancing reliability, improving data interpretation and diagnosis, and enabling assessment of patients with aphasia.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Human Cognitive Neuroscience, Psychology, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK. sergio@ed.ac.uk

ABSTRACT
There has been a growing interest in anosognosia in both clinical and research domains, yet relatively little attention has been paid to methods for evaluating it. Usually, the presence and severity of anosognosia is assessed by means of structured interviews or questionnaires. Both interviews and questionnaires can provide valuable information, but they rely heavily on self-evaluation and language, and are therefore prone to bias and pose more difficulty in the assessment of aphasic patients. The aim of this study was to develop a new tool, the VATA-m (Visual-Analogue Test for Anosognosia for motor impairment), to assess explicit anosognosia for motor impairments. The VATA-m is a questionnaire that compares a patient's self-evaluation with a caregivers' evaluation of the patient's abilities on a series of motor tasks. In addition, the test overcomes some of the limitations of the existing structured interviews and questionnaires, by enhancing reliability, improving data interpretation and diagnosis, and enabling assessment of patients with aphasia.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus