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Reliability and normative values for the foot mobility magnitude: a composite measure of vertical and medial-lateral mobility of the midfoot.

McPoil TG, Vicenzino B, Cornwall MW, Collins N, Warren M - J Foot Ankle Res (2009)

Bottom Line: Normative data are provided for the left and right feet of both the female (n = 211) and male (n = 134) subjects.While the measurements of navicular drop and drift have been used as a clinical method to assess both the vertical and medial-lateral mobility of the midfoot, poor to fair levels of inter-rater reliability have been reported.The results of the current study suggest that the foot mobility magnitude provides the clinician and researcher with a highly reliable measure of vertical and medial-lateral midfoot mobility.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Gait Research Laboratory, Program in Physical Therapy, Northern Arizona University, Flagstaff, Arizona, USA. tom.mcpoil@nau.edu.

ABSTRACT

Background: A study was conducted to determine the reliability and minimal detectable change for a new composite measure of the vertical and medial-lateral mobility of the midfoot called the foot mobility magnitude.

Methods: Three hundred and forty-five healthy participants volunteered to take part in the study. The change in dorsal arch height between weight bearing and non-weight bearing as well as the change in midfoot width between weight bearing and non-weight bearing were measured at 50% of total foot length and used to calculate the foot mobility magnitude. The reliability and minimal detectable change for the measurements were then determined based on the assessment of the measurements by three raters with different levels of clinical experience.

Results: The change in dorsal arch height between weight bearing and non-weight bearing, midfoot width between weight bearing and non-weight bearing, and the foot mobility magnitude were shown to have high levels of intra-rater and inter-rater reliability. Normative data are provided for the left and right feet of both the female (n = 211) and male (n = 134) subjects.

Conclusion: While the measurements of navicular drop and drift have been used as a clinical method to assess both the vertical and medial-lateral mobility of the midfoot, poor to fair levels of inter-rater reliability have been reported. The results of the current study suggest that the foot mobility magnitude provides the clinician and researcher with a highly reliable measure of vertical and medial-lateral midfoot mobility.

No MeSH data available.


Measurement of non-weight bearing midfoot width using digital width caliper.
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Figure 7: Measurement of non-weight bearing midfoot width using digital width caliper.

Mentions: Following the completing of the weight bearing measurements, each subject was asked to sit on the end of a table so that both lower legs were hanging in a perpendicular position to the floor with the feet non-weight bearing and the ankles slightly plantar-flexed. In this position, the non-weight bearing measurements of dorsal arch height and midfoot width were recorded. To assess dorsal arch height in non-weight bearing, the portable platform was positioned under, but without touching the plantar surface of the right foot for each subject. As the portable platform was then moved upward to make contact with the plantar surface of the foot, the subject was instructed to state when they sensed the portable platform "just touching" the plantar surface of the heel, lateral forefoot and medial forefoot of the right foot simultaneously. The subject was told to indicate to the rater if they felt that the portable platform was forcibly pushing their foot into ankle dorsiflexion. If this did happen, the procedure was stopped and repeated so that the subject only sensed that the portable platform was just touching the plantar surface of the right foot. When the subject indicated that the portable platform was "just touching" the plantar surface of their right foot, the vertical digital caliper attached to the portable platform was positioned so that the sliding metal rod could be placed over the 50% foot length mark on the dorsum of the foot (see Figure 6). Once the sliding metal rod of the vertical digital caliper was positioned over the 50% foot length mark, the vertical height from surface of the portable platform to the dorsum of the foot was measured (see Figure 2). To measure the midfoot width in non-weight bearing, the width caliper was positioned so that the edges of the two metal plates attached to each pin of the caliper where aligned laterally and medially to the 50% length point on the dorsum of the right foot. The metal plates were then moved together until rods on both the lateral and the medial side of 50% length point made contact with the skin of the right foot (see Figure 7). Once both rods made contact with the skin, the midfoot width distance was recorded. The non-weight bearing measures were then repeated for the left foot.


Reliability and normative values for the foot mobility magnitude: a composite measure of vertical and medial-lateral mobility of the midfoot.

McPoil TG, Vicenzino B, Cornwall MW, Collins N, Warren M - J Foot Ankle Res (2009)

Measurement of non-weight bearing midfoot width using digital width caliper.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2656480&req=5

Figure 7: Measurement of non-weight bearing midfoot width using digital width caliper.
Mentions: Following the completing of the weight bearing measurements, each subject was asked to sit on the end of a table so that both lower legs were hanging in a perpendicular position to the floor with the feet non-weight bearing and the ankles slightly plantar-flexed. In this position, the non-weight bearing measurements of dorsal arch height and midfoot width were recorded. To assess dorsal arch height in non-weight bearing, the portable platform was positioned under, but without touching the plantar surface of the right foot for each subject. As the portable platform was then moved upward to make contact with the plantar surface of the foot, the subject was instructed to state when they sensed the portable platform "just touching" the plantar surface of the heel, lateral forefoot and medial forefoot of the right foot simultaneously. The subject was told to indicate to the rater if they felt that the portable platform was forcibly pushing their foot into ankle dorsiflexion. If this did happen, the procedure was stopped and repeated so that the subject only sensed that the portable platform was just touching the plantar surface of the right foot. When the subject indicated that the portable platform was "just touching" the plantar surface of their right foot, the vertical digital caliper attached to the portable platform was positioned so that the sliding metal rod could be placed over the 50% foot length mark on the dorsum of the foot (see Figure 6). Once the sliding metal rod of the vertical digital caliper was positioned over the 50% foot length mark, the vertical height from surface of the portable platform to the dorsum of the foot was measured (see Figure 2). To measure the midfoot width in non-weight bearing, the width caliper was positioned so that the edges of the two metal plates attached to each pin of the caliper where aligned laterally and medially to the 50% length point on the dorsum of the right foot. The metal plates were then moved together until rods on both the lateral and the medial side of 50% length point made contact with the skin of the right foot (see Figure 7). Once both rods made contact with the skin, the midfoot width distance was recorded. The non-weight bearing measures were then repeated for the left foot.

Bottom Line: Normative data are provided for the left and right feet of both the female (n = 211) and male (n = 134) subjects.While the measurements of navicular drop and drift have been used as a clinical method to assess both the vertical and medial-lateral mobility of the midfoot, poor to fair levels of inter-rater reliability have been reported.The results of the current study suggest that the foot mobility magnitude provides the clinician and researcher with a highly reliable measure of vertical and medial-lateral midfoot mobility.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Gait Research Laboratory, Program in Physical Therapy, Northern Arizona University, Flagstaff, Arizona, USA. tom.mcpoil@nau.edu.

ABSTRACT

Background: A study was conducted to determine the reliability and minimal detectable change for a new composite measure of the vertical and medial-lateral mobility of the midfoot called the foot mobility magnitude.

Methods: Three hundred and forty-five healthy participants volunteered to take part in the study. The change in dorsal arch height between weight bearing and non-weight bearing as well as the change in midfoot width between weight bearing and non-weight bearing were measured at 50% of total foot length and used to calculate the foot mobility magnitude. The reliability and minimal detectable change for the measurements were then determined based on the assessment of the measurements by three raters with different levels of clinical experience.

Results: The change in dorsal arch height between weight bearing and non-weight bearing, midfoot width between weight bearing and non-weight bearing, and the foot mobility magnitude were shown to have high levels of intra-rater and inter-rater reliability. Normative data are provided for the left and right feet of both the female (n = 211) and male (n = 134) subjects.

Conclusion: While the measurements of navicular drop and drift have been used as a clinical method to assess both the vertical and medial-lateral mobility of the midfoot, poor to fair levels of inter-rater reliability have been reported. The results of the current study suggest that the foot mobility magnitude provides the clinician and researcher with a highly reliable measure of vertical and medial-lateral midfoot mobility.

No MeSH data available.