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Rule knowledge aids performance on spatial and object alternation tasks by alcoholic patients with and without Korsakoff's amnesia.

Bardenhagen FJ, Oscar-Berman M, Bowden SC - Neuropsychiatr Dis Treat (2007)

Bottom Line: Results confirmed that rule knowledge is a crucial cognitive component for solving problems such as DA and OA, and therefore, that errors on these tasks are not due to defective response inhibition alone.These results stress the role of multiple cognitive abilities in successful performance on rule induction tasks.Evidence that these cognitive abilities are served by diffusely distributed neural networks should be considered when interpreting behavioral impairments on these tasks.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Psychology, Victoria University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. fiona.bardenhagen@vu.edu.au

ABSTRACT
Delayed alternation (DA) and object alternation (OA) tasks traditionally have been used to measure defective response inhibition associated with dysfunction of frontal brain systems. However, these tasks are also sensitive to nonfrontal lesions, and cognitive processes such as the induction of rule-learning strategies also are needed in order to perform well on these tasks. Performance on DA and OA tasks was explored in 10 patients with alcohol-induced persisting amnestic disorder (Korsakoff's syndrome), 11 abstinent long-term alcoholics, and 13 healthy non-alcoholic controls under each of two rule provision conditions: Alternation Rule and Correction Rule. Results confirmed that rule knowledge is a crucial cognitive component for solving problems such as DA and OA, and therefore, that errors on these tasks are not due to defective response inhibition alone. Further, rule-induction strategies were helpful to Korsakoff patients, despite their poorer performance on the tasks. These results stress the role of multiple cognitive abilities in successful performance on rule induction tasks. Evidence that these cognitive abilities are served by diffusely distributed neural networks should be considered when interpreting behavioral impairments on these tasks.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The significant Alternation Rule × Correction Rule × Group interaction involving OA nonperseverative errors.
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f4-ndt-3-907: The significant Alternation Rule × Correction Rule × Group interaction involving OA nonperseverative errors.

Mentions: There was a significant three-way interaction of Group × Alternation Rule × Correction Rule for OA nonperseverative errors, F(2, 20) = 4.85, p < 0.02, η2 = 0.327. Examination of this interaction (Figure 4) indicated that while provision of either the Alternation or Correction Rule alone was enough to reduce or eliminate nonperseverative errors in the AL and NC groups, the KS group did not benefit greatly from instruction in the Correction Rule alone, showed substantial variability in performance when given the Alternation Rule alone (visible in the error bars in Figure 4), and performed best when both rules were provided.


Rule knowledge aids performance on spatial and object alternation tasks by alcoholic patients with and without Korsakoff's amnesia.

Bardenhagen FJ, Oscar-Berman M, Bowden SC - Neuropsychiatr Dis Treat (2007)

The significant Alternation Rule × Correction Rule × Group interaction involving OA nonperseverative errors.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2656334&req=5

f4-ndt-3-907: The significant Alternation Rule × Correction Rule × Group interaction involving OA nonperseverative errors.
Mentions: There was a significant three-way interaction of Group × Alternation Rule × Correction Rule for OA nonperseverative errors, F(2, 20) = 4.85, p < 0.02, η2 = 0.327. Examination of this interaction (Figure 4) indicated that while provision of either the Alternation or Correction Rule alone was enough to reduce or eliminate nonperseverative errors in the AL and NC groups, the KS group did not benefit greatly from instruction in the Correction Rule alone, showed substantial variability in performance when given the Alternation Rule alone (visible in the error bars in Figure 4), and performed best when both rules were provided.

Bottom Line: Results confirmed that rule knowledge is a crucial cognitive component for solving problems such as DA and OA, and therefore, that errors on these tasks are not due to defective response inhibition alone.These results stress the role of multiple cognitive abilities in successful performance on rule induction tasks.Evidence that these cognitive abilities are served by diffusely distributed neural networks should be considered when interpreting behavioral impairments on these tasks.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Psychology, Victoria University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. fiona.bardenhagen@vu.edu.au

ABSTRACT
Delayed alternation (DA) and object alternation (OA) tasks traditionally have been used to measure defective response inhibition associated with dysfunction of frontal brain systems. However, these tasks are also sensitive to nonfrontal lesions, and cognitive processes such as the induction of rule-learning strategies also are needed in order to perform well on these tasks. Performance on DA and OA tasks was explored in 10 patients with alcohol-induced persisting amnestic disorder (Korsakoff's syndrome), 11 abstinent long-term alcoholics, and 13 healthy non-alcoholic controls under each of two rule provision conditions: Alternation Rule and Correction Rule. Results confirmed that rule knowledge is a crucial cognitive component for solving problems such as DA and OA, and therefore, that errors on these tasks are not due to defective response inhibition alone. Further, rule-induction strategies were helpful to Korsakoff patients, despite their poorer performance on the tasks. These results stress the role of multiple cognitive abilities in successful performance on rule induction tasks. Evidence that these cognitive abilities are served by diffusely distributed neural networks should be considered when interpreting behavioral impairments on these tasks.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus