Limits...
Invasive pulmonary aspergillosis 10 years post bone marrow transplantation: a case report.

Rashid R, Denning DW - J Med Case Rep (2009)

Bottom Line: Establishing the diagnosis remains a challenge for clinicians working in acute care setting.Possible risk factors include bronchiolitis obliterans and exposure to building dust (for example, handling her husband's dusty overalls).There are no similar case reports in the literature at this time.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Faculty of Medicine and Human Sciences, University of Manchester, Wythenshawe Hospital, Manchester, UK. rifatrashid@hotmail.com.

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Invasive pulmonary aspergillosis is a leading cause of mortality and morbidity in bone marrow transplant recipients. Establishing the diagnosis remains a challenge for clinicians working in acute care setting. However, prompt diagnosis and treatment can lead to favourable outcomes

Case presentation: We report a case of invasive aspergillosis occurring in a 39-year-old Caucasian female 10 years after an allogeneic haematopoietic bone marrow transplant, and 5 years after stopping all immunosuppression. Possible risk factors include bronchiolitis obliterans and exposure to building dust (for example, handling her husband's dusty overalls). There are no similar case reports in the literature at this time.

Conclusion: High clinical suspicion, especially in the setting of failure to respond to broad-spectrum antibiotics, should alert clinicians to the possibility of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis, which, in this case, responded to antifungal therapy.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

September 2005(CT Thorax): Halo sign. Note the so-called "halo sign", seen as a blush around the lesion. This sign is indicative of haemorrhage and highly suggestive of infection with an angioinvasive fungal organism.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2655297&req=5

Figure 1: September 2005(CT Thorax): Halo sign. Note the so-called "halo sign", seen as a blush around the lesion. This sign is indicative of haemorrhage and highly suggestive of infection with an angioinvasive fungal organism.

Mentions: CT scan of the thorax showed multifocal air space shadowing with at least 20 areas of disease and right upper lobe consolidation. In addition, classical findings of halo sign and signet ring sign were reported (Figures 1 and 2), in conjunction with strongly positive serology results (Table 1). Her initial results included negative serum galactomannan and negative blood Aspergillus PCR test but strongly positive precipitins to A. fumigatus at a dilution level of 1/256.


Invasive pulmonary aspergillosis 10 years post bone marrow transplantation: a case report.

Rashid R, Denning DW - J Med Case Rep (2009)

September 2005(CT Thorax): Halo sign. Note the so-called "halo sign", seen as a blush around the lesion. This sign is indicative of haemorrhage and highly suggestive of infection with an angioinvasive fungal organism.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2655297&req=5

Figure 1: September 2005(CT Thorax): Halo sign. Note the so-called "halo sign", seen as a blush around the lesion. This sign is indicative of haemorrhage and highly suggestive of infection with an angioinvasive fungal organism.
Mentions: CT scan of the thorax showed multifocal air space shadowing with at least 20 areas of disease and right upper lobe consolidation. In addition, classical findings of halo sign and signet ring sign were reported (Figures 1 and 2), in conjunction with strongly positive serology results (Table 1). Her initial results included negative serum galactomannan and negative blood Aspergillus PCR test but strongly positive precipitins to A. fumigatus at a dilution level of 1/256.

Bottom Line: Establishing the diagnosis remains a challenge for clinicians working in acute care setting.Possible risk factors include bronchiolitis obliterans and exposure to building dust (for example, handling her husband's dusty overalls).There are no similar case reports in the literature at this time.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Faculty of Medicine and Human Sciences, University of Manchester, Wythenshawe Hospital, Manchester, UK. rifatrashid@hotmail.com.

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Invasive pulmonary aspergillosis is a leading cause of mortality and morbidity in bone marrow transplant recipients. Establishing the diagnosis remains a challenge for clinicians working in acute care setting. However, prompt diagnosis and treatment can lead to favourable outcomes

Case presentation: We report a case of invasive aspergillosis occurring in a 39-year-old Caucasian female 10 years after an allogeneic haematopoietic bone marrow transplant, and 5 years after stopping all immunosuppression. Possible risk factors include bronchiolitis obliterans and exposure to building dust (for example, handling her husband's dusty overalls). There are no similar case reports in the literature at this time.

Conclusion: High clinical suspicion, especially in the setting of failure to respond to broad-spectrum antibiotics, should alert clinicians to the possibility of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis, which, in this case, responded to antifungal therapy.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus