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New assessment tools that measure sleep vital signs: the SleepMed Insomnia Index and the Sleep Matrix.

Bogan RK, Turner JA - Neuropsychiatr Dis Treat (2007)

Bottom Line: Mean SMI scores were assessed based on subsequent sleep-related diagnoses.The Sleep Matrix is a visual tool that quantifies a sleep complaint by combining scores from the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) and the SMI.Additional research using the Sleep Matrix could provide data that the tool could be utilized to visually aid the clinician in the diagnosis of unknown sleep complaints.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: SleepMed of South Carolina, Columbia, SC, USA.

ABSTRACT
Insomnia is the leading sleep disorder in the US; however, diagnosis is often problematic. This pilot study assessed the clinical value of a novel diagnostic insomnia questionnaire. The SleepMed Insomnia Index (SMI) was administered to 543 consecutive patients and 50 normal control subjects during a pilot study. Mean SMI scores were assessed based on subsequent sleep-related diagnoses. The SMI scores for patients with sleep-related disorders were significantly higher than those for the control group (p < 0.001) and highest for the 90 patients comprising the insomnia group. Analysis of the SMI scores from the 90 insomnia patients indicates a high degree of reliability (Cronbach's alpha: 0.7). These data support our clinical experience with this diagnostic tool which indicates a strong likelihood of disrupted nighttime sleep in patients with high SMI scores. Following further validation, the SMI may prove to be a valuable tool for evaluating sleep disorders, specifically as an aid in the diagnosis of insomnia. The Sleep Matrix is a visual tool that quantifies a sleep complaint by combining scores from the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) and the SMI. The SMI measures an insomnia component while the ESS is an accepted measure of daytime sleepiness. The Sleep Matrix visually displays the complexity of the sleep complaint in an effort to differentiate insomnia with differing etiologies from other sleep disorders and measure treatment outcomes. To pilot test the Sleep Matrix, the tool was administered to 90 patients with insomnia and to 22 normal controls. Plots from the insomnia patients were concentrated into the "insomnia zone" while scores from the normal controls were located in the "normal zone" located in the lower left quadrant. Additional research using the Sleep Matrix could provide data that the tool could be utilized to visually aid the clinician in the diagnosis of unknown sleep complaints.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Normal controls. Sleep Matrix plots for 22 normal controls are concentrated in the lower-left corner.
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f2-ndt-3-501: Normal controls. Sleep Matrix plots for 22 normal controls are concentrated in the lower-left corner.

Mentions: SMI and ESS scores from the 90 patients with insomnia (some of the plots represent treated insomnia patients) were plotted on a Sleep Matrix with 22 normal controls, revealing distinctly different patterns. Plots of the insomnia patients were concentrated in the “insomnia zone” in the lower-right corner and a few revealed sleepiness with disrupted sleep (upper-right corner); however, none were in the “normal zone” (Figure 1). In contrast, most all of the plots for the normal controls were located in the lower-left “normal zone” (Figure 2).


New assessment tools that measure sleep vital signs: the SleepMed Insomnia Index and the Sleep Matrix.

Bogan RK, Turner JA - Neuropsychiatr Dis Treat (2007)

Normal controls. Sleep Matrix plots for 22 normal controls are concentrated in the lower-left corner.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2655088&req=5

f2-ndt-3-501: Normal controls. Sleep Matrix plots for 22 normal controls are concentrated in the lower-left corner.
Mentions: SMI and ESS scores from the 90 patients with insomnia (some of the plots represent treated insomnia patients) were plotted on a Sleep Matrix with 22 normal controls, revealing distinctly different patterns. Plots of the insomnia patients were concentrated in the “insomnia zone” in the lower-right corner and a few revealed sleepiness with disrupted sleep (upper-right corner); however, none were in the “normal zone” (Figure 1). In contrast, most all of the plots for the normal controls were located in the lower-left “normal zone” (Figure 2).

Bottom Line: Mean SMI scores were assessed based on subsequent sleep-related diagnoses.The Sleep Matrix is a visual tool that quantifies a sleep complaint by combining scores from the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) and the SMI.Additional research using the Sleep Matrix could provide data that the tool could be utilized to visually aid the clinician in the diagnosis of unknown sleep complaints.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: SleepMed of South Carolina, Columbia, SC, USA.

ABSTRACT
Insomnia is the leading sleep disorder in the US; however, diagnosis is often problematic. This pilot study assessed the clinical value of a novel diagnostic insomnia questionnaire. The SleepMed Insomnia Index (SMI) was administered to 543 consecutive patients and 50 normal control subjects during a pilot study. Mean SMI scores were assessed based on subsequent sleep-related diagnoses. The SMI scores for patients with sleep-related disorders were significantly higher than those for the control group (p < 0.001) and highest for the 90 patients comprising the insomnia group. Analysis of the SMI scores from the 90 insomnia patients indicates a high degree of reliability (Cronbach's alpha: 0.7). These data support our clinical experience with this diagnostic tool which indicates a strong likelihood of disrupted nighttime sleep in patients with high SMI scores. Following further validation, the SMI may prove to be a valuable tool for evaluating sleep disorders, specifically as an aid in the diagnosis of insomnia. The Sleep Matrix is a visual tool that quantifies a sleep complaint by combining scores from the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) and the SMI. The SMI measures an insomnia component while the ESS is an accepted measure of daytime sleepiness. The Sleep Matrix visually displays the complexity of the sleep complaint in an effort to differentiate insomnia with differing etiologies from other sleep disorders and measure treatment outcomes. To pilot test the Sleep Matrix, the tool was administered to 90 patients with insomnia and to 22 normal controls. Plots from the insomnia patients were concentrated into the "insomnia zone" while scores from the normal controls were located in the "normal zone" located in the lower left quadrant. Additional research using the Sleep Matrix could provide data that the tool could be utilized to visually aid the clinician in the diagnosis of unknown sleep complaints.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus