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Historical overview of spinal deformities in ancient Greece.

Vasiliadis ES, Grivas TB, Kaspiris A - Scoliosis (2009)

Bottom Line: He introduced the terms kyphosis and scoliosis and wrote in depth about diagnosis and treatment of kyphosis and less about scoliosis.The innovation of the board, the application of axial traction and even the principle of trans-abdominal correction for correction of spinal deformities have their origin in Hippocrates.Galen, who lived nearly five centuries later impressively described scoliosis, lordosis and kyphosis, provided aetiologic implications and used the same principles with Hippocrates for their management, while his studies influenced medical practice on spinal deformities for more than 1500 years.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Orthopaedic Department, "Thriasio" General Hospital, Magoula, Attica, Greece. eliasvasiliadis@yahoo.gr

ABSTRACT
Little is known about the history of spinal deformities in ancient Greece. The present study summarizes what we know today for diagnosis and management of spinal deformities in ancient Greece, mainly from the medical treatises of Hippocrates and Galen. Hippocrates, through accurate observation and logical reasoning was led to accurate conclusions firstly for the structure of the spine and secondly for its diseases. He introduced the terms kyphosis and scoliosis and wrote in depth about diagnosis and treatment of kyphosis and less about scoliosis. The innovation of the board, the application of axial traction and even the principle of trans-abdominal correction for correction of spinal deformities have their origin in Hippocrates. Galen, who lived nearly five centuries later impressively described scoliosis, lordosis and kyphosis, provided aetiologic implications and used the same principles with Hippocrates for their management, while his studies influenced medical practice on spinal deformities for more than 1500 years.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

A schematic representation of the application of corrective forces for spinal deformities by the use of straps and bands, properly adjusted on the Hippocratic board.
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Figure 18: A schematic representation of the application of corrective forces for spinal deformities by the use of straps and bands, properly adjusted on the Hippocratic board.

Mentions: For patients where stronger forces are required Hippocrates recommended (Figure 17): "The apparatus for forcible reduction should be arranged as follows. One may fix in the ground a strong broad plank having in it a transverse groove. Or, instead of the plank, one may cut a transverse groove in a wall, a cubit above the ground, or as may be convenient. Then place a sort of quadrangular oak board parallel with the wall and far enough from it that one may pass between if necessary; and spread cloaks on the board, or something that shall be soft, but not very yielding. Give the patient a vapour bath if possible, or one with plenty of hot water; then make him lie stretched out in a prone position and fasten his arms, extending them naturally, to the body. A soft band, sufficiently broad and long, composed of two strands, should be applied at its middle to the middle of the chest, and passed twice round it as near as possible to the armpits; then let what remains of the (two) bands be passed round the shoulders at each side, and the ends be attached to a pestle-shaped pole, adjusting their length to that of the underlying board against which the pestle-shaped pole is put, using it as a fulcrum to make extension (Figure 18). A second similar band should be attached above the knees and above the heels, and the ends of the straps fastened to a similar pole. With another soft, strong strap, like a head-band, of sufficient breadth and length, the patient should be bound strongly round the loins, as near as possible to the hips. Then fasten what is over of this band, as well as the ends of both the other straps, to the pole of the foot end; next, make extension in this position towards either end simultaneously, equally and in a straight line [9].


Historical overview of spinal deformities in ancient Greece.

Vasiliadis ES, Grivas TB, Kaspiris A - Scoliosis (2009)

A schematic representation of the application of corrective forces for spinal deformities by the use of straps and bands, properly adjusted on the Hippocratic board.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2654856&req=5

Figure 18: A schematic representation of the application of corrective forces for spinal deformities by the use of straps and bands, properly adjusted on the Hippocratic board.
Mentions: For patients where stronger forces are required Hippocrates recommended (Figure 17): "The apparatus for forcible reduction should be arranged as follows. One may fix in the ground a strong broad plank having in it a transverse groove. Or, instead of the plank, one may cut a transverse groove in a wall, a cubit above the ground, or as may be convenient. Then place a sort of quadrangular oak board parallel with the wall and far enough from it that one may pass between if necessary; and spread cloaks on the board, or something that shall be soft, but not very yielding. Give the patient a vapour bath if possible, or one with plenty of hot water; then make him lie stretched out in a prone position and fasten his arms, extending them naturally, to the body. A soft band, sufficiently broad and long, composed of two strands, should be applied at its middle to the middle of the chest, and passed twice round it as near as possible to the armpits; then let what remains of the (two) bands be passed round the shoulders at each side, and the ends be attached to a pestle-shaped pole, adjusting their length to that of the underlying board against which the pestle-shaped pole is put, using it as a fulcrum to make extension (Figure 18). A second similar band should be attached above the knees and above the heels, and the ends of the straps fastened to a similar pole. With another soft, strong strap, like a head-band, of sufficient breadth and length, the patient should be bound strongly round the loins, as near as possible to the hips. Then fasten what is over of this band, as well as the ends of both the other straps, to the pole of the foot end; next, make extension in this position towards either end simultaneously, equally and in a straight line [9].

Bottom Line: He introduced the terms kyphosis and scoliosis and wrote in depth about diagnosis and treatment of kyphosis and less about scoliosis.The innovation of the board, the application of axial traction and even the principle of trans-abdominal correction for correction of spinal deformities have their origin in Hippocrates.Galen, who lived nearly five centuries later impressively described scoliosis, lordosis and kyphosis, provided aetiologic implications and used the same principles with Hippocrates for their management, while his studies influenced medical practice on spinal deformities for more than 1500 years.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Orthopaedic Department, "Thriasio" General Hospital, Magoula, Attica, Greece. eliasvasiliadis@yahoo.gr

ABSTRACT
Little is known about the history of spinal deformities in ancient Greece. The present study summarizes what we know today for diagnosis and management of spinal deformities in ancient Greece, mainly from the medical treatises of Hippocrates and Galen. Hippocrates, through accurate observation and logical reasoning was led to accurate conclusions firstly for the structure of the spine and secondly for its diseases. He introduced the terms kyphosis and scoliosis and wrote in depth about diagnosis and treatment of kyphosis and less about scoliosis. The innovation of the board, the application of axial traction and even the principle of trans-abdominal correction for correction of spinal deformities have their origin in Hippocrates. Galen, who lived nearly five centuries later impressively described scoliosis, lordosis and kyphosis, provided aetiologic implications and used the same principles with Hippocrates for their management, while his studies influenced medical practice on spinal deformities for more than 1500 years.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus