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Historical overview of spinal deformities in ancient Greece.

Vasiliadis ES, Grivas TB, Kaspiris A - Scoliosis (2009)

Bottom Line: He introduced the terms kyphosis and scoliosis and wrote in depth about diagnosis and treatment of kyphosis and less about scoliosis.The innovation of the board, the application of axial traction and even the principle of trans-abdominal correction for correction of spinal deformities have their origin in Hippocrates.Galen, who lived nearly five centuries later impressively described scoliosis, lordosis and kyphosis, provided aetiologic implications and used the same principles with Hippocrates for their management, while his studies influenced medical practice on spinal deformities for more than 1500 years.

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Affiliation: Orthopaedic Department, "Thriasio" General Hospital, Magoula, Attica, Greece. eliasvasiliadis@yahoo.gr

ABSTRACT
Little is known about the history of spinal deformities in ancient Greece. The present study summarizes what we know today for diagnosis and management of spinal deformities in ancient Greece, mainly from the medical treatises of Hippocrates and Galen. Hippocrates, through accurate observation and logical reasoning was led to accurate conclusions firstly for the structure of the spine and secondly for its diseases. He introduced the terms kyphosis and scoliosis and wrote in depth about diagnosis and treatment of kyphosis and less about scoliosis. The innovation of the board, the application of axial traction and even the principle of trans-abdominal correction for correction of spinal deformities have their origin in Hippocrates. Galen, who lived nearly five centuries later impressively described scoliosis, lordosis and kyphosis, provided aetiologic implications and used the same principles with Hippocrates for their management, while his studies influenced medical practice on spinal deformities for more than 1500 years.

No MeSH data available.


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Galen of Pergamon.
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Figure 11: Galen of Pergamon.

Mentions: Galen of Pergamon (130–200 AD) (Figure 11), another eminent Greek physician, who initially was the physician of gladiators, wrote numerous medical books in Greek language, but unfortunately only 118 treatises were saved from a fire in Rome, where he served as the physician of the emperor, Marcus Aurelius. He worked as a surgeon and anatomist and was the founder of experimental physiology and embryology [8]. Today, the reference collection of Galen's works is a 22-volume edition of C. G. Kühn (Lipsiae 1821–1833), which offers the Greek text with a Latin translation. Many of his texts has never been translated into modern languages, therefore they are inaccessible to the public. Even if we were to eliminate the writings of the Corpus Hippocraticum, Galen's exceptional output would still represent more than 80% of all surviving medical writings of antiquity [8]. In his medical books there are a lot comments on the Hippocratic books. Information about spinal deformities are contained in his books under the titles Hippocrates' Peri arthron and Four Comments on It («Ιπποκράτους, το περί άρθρων βιβλίον και Γαληνού εις αυτό υπομνήματατέσσεραα»), Three Comments on Hippocrates' Peri agmon («Εις το Ιπποκράττους, περίαγμών»), On Bones for beginners («Περί οστών τοις εισαγομένοις») and On the Usefulness of the Parts of the Body («Περί χρείας των εν ανθρώπον σώματι μορίων»).


Historical overview of spinal deformities in ancient Greece.

Vasiliadis ES, Grivas TB, Kaspiris A - Scoliosis (2009)

Galen of Pergamon.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2654856&req=5

Figure 11: Galen of Pergamon.
Mentions: Galen of Pergamon (130–200 AD) (Figure 11), another eminent Greek physician, who initially was the physician of gladiators, wrote numerous medical books in Greek language, but unfortunately only 118 treatises were saved from a fire in Rome, where he served as the physician of the emperor, Marcus Aurelius. He worked as a surgeon and anatomist and was the founder of experimental physiology and embryology [8]. Today, the reference collection of Galen's works is a 22-volume edition of C. G. Kühn (Lipsiae 1821–1833), which offers the Greek text with a Latin translation. Many of his texts has never been translated into modern languages, therefore they are inaccessible to the public. Even if we were to eliminate the writings of the Corpus Hippocraticum, Galen's exceptional output would still represent more than 80% of all surviving medical writings of antiquity [8]. In his medical books there are a lot comments on the Hippocratic books. Information about spinal deformities are contained in his books under the titles Hippocrates' Peri arthron and Four Comments on It («Ιπποκράτους, το περί άρθρων βιβλίον και Γαληνού εις αυτό υπομνήματατέσσεραα»), Three Comments on Hippocrates' Peri agmon («Εις το Ιπποκράττους, περίαγμών»), On Bones for beginners («Περί οστών τοις εισαγομένοις») and On the Usefulness of the Parts of the Body («Περί χρείας των εν ανθρώπον σώματι μορίων»).

Bottom Line: He introduced the terms kyphosis and scoliosis and wrote in depth about diagnosis and treatment of kyphosis and less about scoliosis.The innovation of the board, the application of axial traction and even the principle of trans-abdominal correction for correction of spinal deformities have their origin in Hippocrates.Galen, who lived nearly five centuries later impressively described scoliosis, lordosis and kyphosis, provided aetiologic implications and used the same principles with Hippocrates for their management, while his studies influenced medical practice on spinal deformities for more than 1500 years.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Orthopaedic Department, "Thriasio" General Hospital, Magoula, Attica, Greece. eliasvasiliadis@yahoo.gr

ABSTRACT
Little is known about the history of spinal deformities in ancient Greece. The present study summarizes what we know today for diagnosis and management of spinal deformities in ancient Greece, mainly from the medical treatises of Hippocrates and Galen. Hippocrates, through accurate observation and logical reasoning was led to accurate conclusions firstly for the structure of the spine and secondly for its diseases. He introduced the terms kyphosis and scoliosis and wrote in depth about diagnosis and treatment of kyphosis and less about scoliosis. The innovation of the board, the application of axial traction and even the principle of trans-abdominal correction for correction of spinal deformities have their origin in Hippocrates. Galen, who lived nearly five centuries later impressively described scoliosis, lordosis and kyphosis, provided aetiologic implications and used the same principles with Hippocrates for their management, while his studies influenced medical practice on spinal deformities for more than 1500 years.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus