Limits...
Common processes in pathogenesis by fungal and oomycete plant pathogens, described with Gene Ontology terms.

Meng S, Torto-Alalibo T, Chibucos MC, Tyler BM, Dean RA - BMC Microbiol. (2009)

Bottom Line: Plant diseases caused by fungi and oomycetes result in significant economic losses every year.Previously, many of these common processes did not have corresponding Gene Ontology (GO) terms.This set of standardized GO terms provides a solid base to further compare and contrast the molecular underpinnings of fungal and oomycete pathogenesis.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Center for Integrated Fungal Research, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695, USA. mengs@med.unc.edu

ABSTRACT
Plant diseases caused by fungi and oomycetes result in significant economic losses every year. Although phylogenetically distant, the infection processes by these organisms share many common features. These include dispersal of an infectious particle, host adhesion, recognition, penetration, invasive growth, and lesion development. Previously, many of these common processes did not have corresponding Gene Ontology (GO) terms. For example, no GO terms existed to describe processes related to the appressorium, an important structure for infection by many fungi and oomycetes. In this mini-review, we identify common features of the pathogenic processes of fungi and oomycetes and create a pathogenesis model using 256 newly developed and 38 extant GO terms, with an emphasis on the appressorium and signal transduction. This set of standardized GO terms provides a solid base to further compare and contrast the molecular underpinnings of fungal and oomycete pathogenesis.

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

The infection process in fungal and oomycete pathogens. Modified by permission from Schumann, G. L., 1991, Plant diseases: Their biology and social impact, American Phytopathological Society, St. Paul, MN.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2654667&req=5

Figure 2: The infection process in fungal and oomycete pathogens. Modified by permission from Schumann, G. L., 1991, Plant diseases: Their biology and social impact, American Phytopathological Society, St. Paul, MN.

Mentions: In this review, we summarize common mechanisms of pathogenesis displayed by oomycetes and fungi. Pathogenesis by a fungus or oomycete is a complex process. Briefly, it includes the following steps: dispersal and arrival of an infectious particle (usually a spore of some kind) in the vicinity of the host, adhesion to the host, recognition of the host (which may occur prior to adhesion), penetration into the host, invasive growth within the host, lesion development in the host, and finally production of additional infectious particles [5,6] (see Figures 1, 2). In order to describe the entire process, we formulate a description of pathogenesis using standardized terms from the Gene Ontology (GO), including 256 new terms developed by members of the PAMGO (Plant-Associated Microbe Gene Ontology) consortium , an official interest group of the GO Consortium, as well as 38 extant GO terms that are placed in shaded boxes in Figures 3, 4, 5, 6.


Common processes in pathogenesis by fungal and oomycete plant pathogens, described with Gene Ontology terms.

Meng S, Torto-Alalibo T, Chibucos MC, Tyler BM, Dean RA - BMC Microbiol. (2009)

The infection process in fungal and oomycete pathogens. Modified by permission from Schumann, G. L., 1991, Plant diseases: Their biology and social impact, American Phytopathological Society, St. Paul, MN.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2654667&req=5

Figure 2: The infection process in fungal and oomycete pathogens. Modified by permission from Schumann, G. L., 1991, Plant diseases: Their biology and social impact, American Phytopathological Society, St. Paul, MN.
Mentions: In this review, we summarize common mechanisms of pathogenesis displayed by oomycetes and fungi. Pathogenesis by a fungus or oomycete is a complex process. Briefly, it includes the following steps: dispersal and arrival of an infectious particle (usually a spore of some kind) in the vicinity of the host, adhesion to the host, recognition of the host (which may occur prior to adhesion), penetration into the host, invasive growth within the host, lesion development in the host, and finally production of additional infectious particles [5,6] (see Figures 1, 2). In order to describe the entire process, we formulate a description of pathogenesis using standardized terms from the Gene Ontology (GO), including 256 new terms developed by members of the PAMGO (Plant-Associated Microbe Gene Ontology) consortium , an official interest group of the GO Consortium, as well as 38 extant GO terms that are placed in shaded boxes in Figures 3, 4, 5, 6.

Bottom Line: Plant diseases caused by fungi and oomycetes result in significant economic losses every year.Previously, many of these common processes did not have corresponding Gene Ontology (GO) terms.This set of standardized GO terms provides a solid base to further compare and contrast the molecular underpinnings of fungal and oomycete pathogenesis.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Center for Integrated Fungal Research, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695, USA. mengs@med.unc.edu

ABSTRACT
Plant diseases caused by fungi and oomycetes result in significant economic losses every year. Although phylogenetically distant, the infection processes by these organisms share many common features. These include dispersal of an infectious particle, host adhesion, recognition, penetration, invasive growth, and lesion development. Previously, many of these common processes did not have corresponding Gene Ontology (GO) terms. For example, no GO terms existed to describe processes related to the appressorium, an important structure for infection by many fungi and oomycetes. In this mini-review, we identify common features of the pathogenic processes of fungi and oomycetes and create a pathogenesis model using 256 newly developed and 38 extant GO terms, with an emphasis on the appressorium and signal transduction. This set of standardized GO terms provides a solid base to further compare and contrast the molecular underpinnings of fungal and oomycete pathogenesis.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus