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Managing patient adherence and quality of life in epilepsy.

Eatock J, Baker GA - Neuropsychiatr Dis Treat (2007)

Bottom Line: Patient adherence to medication continues to be a cause of concern within the medical profession.Contributions from the medical, health belief, and psychosocial models are discussed in order to highlight how the concept of adherence has changed over time.The volume and quality of previous research conducted has enabled a number of predictive factors to be identified, from which various strategies have been developed.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Neurological Science, University of Liverpool, UK.

ABSTRACT
Patient adherence to medication continues to be a cause of concern within the medical profession. This review examines the various methods of quantifying the level of patient adherence, progress in predicting causes of non-adherence, and the implications for its management. Contributions from the medical, health belief, and psychosocial models are discussed in order to highlight how the concept of adherence has changed over time. The impact of epilepsy, seizures, and taking antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) on both adherence and quality of life are also explored. The volume and quality of previous research conducted has enabled a number of predictive factors to be identified, from which various strategies have been developed. While this review concentrates on potential strategies in managing treatment adherence within epilepsy, findings can equally be applied to other chronic conditions.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Model hypothesized by Becker and Maiman (1975) for predicting and explaining compliance behavior. Reprinted with permission from Becker MH, Maiman LA. 1975. Sociobehavioural determinants of compliance with health and medical care recommendations. Med Care, 13:10–23. © 1975 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.
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f1-ndt-3-117: Model hypothesized by Becker and Maiman (1975) for predicting and explaining compliance behavior. Reprinted with permission from Becker MH, Maiman LA. 1975. Sociobehavioural determinants of compliance with health and medical care recommendations. Med Care, 13:10–23. © 1975 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

Mentions: Social scientists have recognized how compliance is rooted in this clinician perspective and have attempted to examine the concept from a patient standpoint. The medication regime recommended has to be interpreted by the patient, who examines how the advice can be incorporated into their lifestyle and “self regulates” their drug taking schedule (Conrad 1985). A health belief model hypothesized by Becker and Maiman (1975) (Figure 1) includes the most frequently examined aspects of compliance (age, drug regime, peer effects, doctor relationship) interacting with an individual’s motivations, and perceived benefits or costs of adherence to medication. To Donovan and Blake (1992) this weighing up of severity of symptoms and symptom relief juxtaposed against risks of treatment illustrates how non-compliance can be deliberate and the result of patients actively making decisions about their own treatment.


Managing patient adherence and quality of life in epilepsy.

Eatock J, Baker GA - Neuropsychiatr Dis Treat (2007)

Model hypothesized by Becker and Maiman (1975) for predicting and explaining compliance behavior. Reprinted with permission from Becker MH, Maiman LA. 1975. Sociobehavioural determinants of compliance with health and medical care recommendations. Med Care, 13:10–23. © 1975 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2654533&req=5

f1-ndt-3-117: Model hypothesized by Becker and Maiman (1975) for predicting and explaining compliance behavior. Reprinted with permission from Becker MH, Maiman LA. 1975. Sociobehavioural determinants of compliance with health and medical care recommendations. Med Care, 13:10–23. © 1975 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.
Mentions: Social scientists have recognized how compliance is rooted in this clinician perspective and have attempted to examine the concept from a patient standpoint. The medication regime recommended has to be interpreted by the patient, who examines how the advice can be incorporated into their lifestyle and “self regulates” their drug taking schedule (Conrad 1985). A health belief model hypothesized by Becker and Maiman (1975) (Figure 1) includes the most frequently examined aspects of compliance (age, drug regime, peer effects, doctor relationship) interacting with an individual’s motivations, and perceived benefits or costs of adherence to medication. To Donovan and Blake (1992) this weighing up of severity of symptoms and symptom relief juxtaposed against risks of treatment illustrates how non-compliance can be deliberate and the result of patients actively making decisions about their own treatment.

Bottom Line: Patient adherence to medication continues to be a cause of concern within the medical profession.Contributions from the medical, health belief, and psychosocial models are discussed in order to highlight how the concept of adherence has changed over time.The volume and quality of previous research conducted has enabled a number of predictive factors to be identified, from which various strategies have been developed.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Neurological Science, University of Liverpool, UK.

ABSTRACT
Patient adherence to medication continues to be a cause of concern within the medical profession. This review examines the various methods of quantifying the level of patient adherence, progress in predicting causes of non-adherence, and the implications for its management. Contributions from the medical, health belief, and psychosocial models are discussed in order to highlight how the concept of adherence has changed over time. The impact of epilepsy, seizures, and taking antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) on both adherence and quality of life are also explored. The volume and quality of previous research conducted has enabled a number of predictive factors to be identified, from which various strategies have been developed. While this review concentrates on potential strategies in managing treatment adherence within epilepsy, findings can equally be applied to other chronic conditions.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus