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Dose-dependent effects of barley cooked with white rice on postprandial glucose and desacyl ghrelin levels.

Sakuma M, Yamanaka-Okumura H, Naniwa Y, Matsumoto D, Tsunematsu M, Yamamoto H, Taketani Y, Takeda E - J Clin Biochem Nutr (2009)

Bottom Line: Area under the curves of plasma glucose and insulin concentrations was reduced by barley intake in a dose-dependent manner.Although plasma desacyl ghrelin levels decreased postprandially, the degree of reduction was suppressed by barley intake in a dose-dependent manner.The combination of white rice with barley plays a beneficial role in preventing and treating type 2 diabetes, obesity and other metabolic diseases.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Clinical Nutrition, Institute of Health Biosciences, University of Tokushima Graduate School, 3-18-15 Kuramoto, Tokushima 770-8503, Japan.

ABSTRACT
White rice is an indispensable staple food in Japan, although it is a high glycemic index food. The objective of this study was to estimate how barley cooked with white rice might affect postprandial glucose, insulin and desacyl ghrelin concentrations as well as fullness. The study was conducted in randomized crossover design with nine healthy subjects. Blood glucose, insulin, free fatty acid and desacyl ghrelin concentrations and subjective levels of fullness and hunger were measured for 240 min after intake of glucose, white rice, 30% rolled barley (30BAR), 50% rolled barley (50BAR) and 100% rolled barley (100BAR) containing 75 g of available carbohydrate. Postprandial glucose and insulin levels were suppressed by intake of 30BAR, 50BAR and 100BAR comparing with those of white rice. Area under the curves of plasma glucose and insulin concentrations was reduced by barley intake in a dose-dependent manner. Although plasma desacyl ghrelin levels decreased postprandially, the degree of reduction was suppressed by barley intake in a dose-dependent manner. Postprandial desacyl ghrelin levels can be a sensitive biomarker of carbohydrate metabolism. The combination of white rice with barley plays a beneficial role in preventing and treating type 2 diabetes, obesity and other metabolic diseases.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Postprandial plasma glucose (a), serum insulin (b) and serum free fatty acid (c) levels and incremental plasma glucose AUC (d) and serum insulin AUC (e) after ingestion of the 3 test meals (glucose, white rice, barley). X, glucose (GL); open circle, white rice (WR); closed circle, 100% barley (100BAR). Black bar, glucose (GL); white bar, white rice (WR); hatched bar, 100% barley (100BAR). Mean values with their standard errors. *p<0.05, GL vs 100BAR; †p<0.05, GL vs WR; ‡p<0.05, 100BAR vs WR. Bars in the same panel with different letters are significantly different, p<0.05.
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Figure 1: Postprandial plasma glucose (a), serum insulin (b) and serum free fatty acid (c) levels and incremental plasma glucose AUC (d) and serum insulin AUC (e) after ingestion of the 3 test meals (glucose, white rice, barley). X, glucose (GL); open circle, white rice (WR); closed circle, 100% barley (100BAR). Black bar, glucose (GL); white bar, white rice (WR); hatched bar, 100% barley (100BAR). Mean values with their standard errors. *p<0.05, GL vs 100BAR; †p<0.05, GL vs WR; ‡p<0.05, 100BAR vs WR. Bars in the same panel with different letters are significantly different, p<0.05.

Mentions: Plasma glucose levels at 30, 45 and 60 min in 100BAR were significantly lower than in GL (p<0.01; 30 and 45 min, p<0.05; 60 min) and WR (p<0.01; 45 min, p<0.05; 30 and 60 min). No differences were observed between GL and WR (Fig. 1a). Serum insulin levels increased after each meal reaching a peak value at 45 min for GL and WR, and at 30 min for 100BAR. Serum insulin levels for 100BAR at 30–120 min were significantly lower than for GL (p<0.01; 45, 60, 90 and 120 min, p<0.05; 30 min). At 60 and 90 min serum insulin levels for 100BAR were significantly lower than those in WR (p<0.05, respectively). Serum insulin level at 60 min for WR was markedly lower than for GL (p<0.05) (Fig. 1b). Serum FFA levels for 100BAR fell more slowly than for GL and WR. At 45 and 120 min serum FFA levels for 100BAR were significantly higher than for GL (p<0.05; respectively), and significantly higher than GL and WR at 180 min (p<0.01; respectively). Serum FFA level for GL quickly increased and returned to fasting level at 240 min, and were significantly higher than those for WR and BAR (p<0.01; respectively) (Fig. 1c).


Dose-dependent effects of barley cooked with white rice on postprandial glucose and desacyl ghrelin levels.

Sakuma M, Yamanaka-Okumura H, Naniwa Y, Matsumoto D, Tsunematsu M, Yamamoto H, Taketani Y, Takeda E - J Clin Biochem Nutr (2009)

Postprandial plasma glucose (a), serum insulin (b) and serum free fatty acid (c) levels and incremental plasma glucose AUC (d) and serum insulin AUC (e) after ingestion of the 3 test meals (glucose, white rice, barley). X, glucose (GL); open circle, white rice (WR); closed circle, 100% barley (100BAR). Black bar, glucose (GL); white bar, white rice (WR); hatched bar, 100% barley (100BAR). Mean values with their standard errors. *p<0.05, GL vs 100BAR; †p<0.05, GL vs WR; ‡p<0.05, 100BAR vs WR. Bars in the same panel with different letters are significantly different, p<0.05.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

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getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2654471&req=5

Figure 1: Postprandial plasma glucose (a), serum insulin (b) and serum free fatty acid (c) levels and incremental plasma glucose AUC (d) and serum insulin AUC (e) after ingestion of the 3 test meals (glucose, white rice, barley). X, glucose (GL); open circle, white rice (WR); closed circle, 100% barley (100BAR). Black bar, glucose (GL); white bar, white rice (WR); hatched bar, 100% barley (100BAR). Mean values with their standard errors. *p<0.05, GL vs 100BAR; †p<0.05, GL vs WR; ‡p<0.05, 100BAR vs WR. Bars in the same panel with different letters are significantly different, p<0.05.
Mentions: Plasma glucose levels at 30, 45 and 60 min in 100BAR were significantly lower than in GL (p<0.01; 30 and 45 min, p<0.05; 60 min) and WR (p<0.01; 45 min, p<0.05; 30 and 60 min). No differences were observed between GL and WR (Fig. 1a). Serum insulin levels increased after each meal reaching a peak value at 45 min for GL and WR, and at 30 min for 100BAR. Serum insulin levels for 100BAR at 30–120 min were significantly lower than for GL (p<0.01; 45, 60, 90 and 120 min, p<0.05; 30 min). At 60 and 90 min serum insulin levels for 100BAR were significantly lower than those in WR (p<0.05, respectively). Serum insulin level at 60 min for WR was markedly lower than for GL (p<0.05) (Fig. 1b). Serum FFA levels for 100BAR fell more slowly than for GL and WR. At 45 and 120 min serum FFA levels for 100BAR were significantly higher than for GL (p<0.05; respectively), and significantly higher than GL and WR at 180 min (p<0.01; respectively). Serum FFA level for GL quickly increased and returned to fasting level at 240 min, and were significantly higher than those for WR and BAR (p<0.01; respectively) (Fig. 1c).

Bottom Line: Area under the curves of plasma glucose and insulin concentrations was reduced by barley intake in a dose-dependent manner.Although plasma desacyl ghrelin levels decreased postprandially, the degree of reduction was suppressed by barley intake in a dose-dependent manner.The combination of white rice with barley plays a beneficial role in preventing and treating type 2 diabetes, obesity and other metabolic diseases.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Clinical Nutrition, Institute of Health Biosciences, University of Tokushima Graduate School, 3-18-15 Kuramoto, Tokushima 770-8503, Japan.

ABSTRACT
White rice is an indispensable staple food in Japan, although it is a high glycemic index food. The objective of this study was to estimate how barley cooked with white rice might affect postprandial glucose, insulin and desacyl ghrelin concentrations as well as fullness. The study was conducted in randomized crossover design with nine healthy subjects. Blood glucose, insulin, free fatty acid and desacyl ghrelin concentrations and subjective levels of fullness and hunger were measured for 240 min after intake of glucose, white rice, 30% rolled barley (30BAR), 50% rolled barley (50BAR) and 100% rolled barley (100BAR) containing 75 g of available carbohydrate. Postprandial glucose and insulin levels were suppressed by intake of 30BAR, 50BAR and 100BAR comparing with those of white rice. Area under the curves of plasma glucose and insulin concentrations was reduced by barley intake in a dose-dependent manner. Although plasma desacyl ghrelin levels decreased postprandially, the degree of reduction was suppressed by barley intake in a dose-dependent manner. Postprandial desacyl ghrelin levels can be a sensitive biomarker of carbohydrate metabolism. The combination of white rice with barley plays a beneficial role in preventing and treating type 2 diabetes, obesity and other metabolic diseases.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus