Limits...
Normative productivity of the global vegetation.

Alexandrov GA, Matsunaga T - Carbon Balance Manag (2008)

Bottom Line: At the same time we call attention to the emerging alternative: the global potential for net primary production of biomass may be as high as 70 PgC y-1, the productivity of larch forest zone may be comparable to the productivity of taiga zone, and the productivity of rain-green forest zone may be comparable to the productivity of tropical rainforest zone.The departure from Miami model's worldview mentioned above cannot be simply ignored.It requires thorough examination using modern observational tools and techniques for model-data fusion.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Office for Global Environmental Database, Center for Global Environmental Research, National Institute for Environmental Studies, Onogawa 16-2, Tsukuba, Japan. g.alexandrov@nies.go.jp.

ABSTRACT

Background: The biosphere models of terrestrial productivity are essential for projecting climate change and assessing mitigation and adaptation options. Many of them have been developed in connection to the International Geosphere-Biosphere Program (IGBP) that backs the work of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). In the end of 1990s, IGBP sponsored release of a data set summarizing the model outputs and setting certain norms for estimates of terrestrial productivity. Since a number of new models and new versions of old models were developed during the past decade, these normative data require updating.

Results: Here, we provide the series of updates that reflects evolution of biosphere models and demonstrates evolutional stability of the global and regional estimates of terrestrial productivity. Most of them fit well the long-living Miami model. At the same time we call attention to the emerging alternative: the global potential for net primary production of biomass may be as high as 70 PgC y-1, the productivity of larch forest zone may be comparable to the productivity of taiga zone, and the productivity of rain-green forest zone may be comparable to the productivity of tropical rainforest zone.

Conclusion: The departure from Miami model's worldview mentioned above cannot be simply ignored. It requires thorough examination using modern observational tools and techniques for model-data fusion. Stability of normative knowledge is not its ultimate goal - the norms for estimates of terrestrial productivity must be evidence-based.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Alternative NPP (version 1.13.0) of major vegetation zones plotted against mean annual temperature (left pane) and annual precipitation (right pane). Points mark mean values, ellipses delineate standard deviations from the mean values, and lines represent temperature curve and humidity curve of the Miami NPP model, respectively. Legend: 42 – tundra, 14 – larch forests, 36 – needle-leaf forests, 13 – summer-green broad-leaved forests, 4 – evergreen broad-leaved forests, 8 – tropical rainforests, 6 – deserts, 27 – semi-desert scrubs, 7 – shrublands, 15 – grasslands, 10 – subhumid woodlands, 3 – raingreen forests.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2654439&req=5

Figure 3: Alternative NPP (version 1.13.0) of major vegetation zones plotted against mean annual temperature (left pane) and annual precipitation (right pane). Points mark mean values, ellipses delineate standard deviations from the mean values, and lines represent temperature curve and humidity curve of the Miami NPP model, respectively. Legend: 42 – tundra, 14 – larch forests, 36 – needle-leaf forests, 13 – summer-green broad-leaved forests, 4 – evergreen broad-leaved forests, 8 – tropical rainforests, 6 – deserts, 27 – semi-desert scrubs, 7 – shrublands, 15 – grasslands, 10 – subhumid woodlands, 3 – raingreen forests.

Mentions: The method of building normative data employed in this study (see Methods) works against estimates suggesting too large shifts in mean values. These estimates form the pool of alternative data. The series of alternative data (Additional files 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17) shows large variations of totals: from 64 to 91.7 PgC y-1. In the final version (Additional file 17), the total is 71.4 PgC y-1 and sub-totals depart widely from the Miami model projections (Figure 3) implying an alternative global pattern of productivity (Figure 4). This pattern may be characterized in general as "seasonality sensitive". The productivity of larch forests (14) is comparable to that of taiga (36), and the productivity of rain-green forests (3) is comparable to that of tropical rainforests (8), emphasizing that conditions during the growing season, not during the whole year, are crucial.


Normative productivity of the global vegetation.

Alexandrov GA, Matsunaga T - Carbon Balance Manag (2008)

Alternative NPP (version 1.13.0) of major vegetation zones plotted against mean annual temperature (left pane) and annual precipitation (right pane). Points mark mean values, ellipses delineate standard deviations from the mean values, and lines represent temperature curve and humidity curve of the Miami NPP model, respectively. Legend: 42 – tundra, 14 – larch forests, 36 – needle-leaf forests, 13 – summer-green broad-leaved forests, 4 – evergreen broad-leaved forests, 8 – tropical rainforests, 6 – deserts, 27 – semi-desert scrubs, 7 – shrublands, 15 – grasslands, 10 – subhumid woodlands, 3 – raingreen forests.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2654439&req=5

Figure 3: Alternative NPP (version 1.13.0) of major vegetation zones plotted against mean annual temperature (left pane) and annual precipitation (right pane). Points mark mean values, ellipses delineate standard deviations from the mean values, and lines represent temperature curve and humidity curve of the Miami NPP model, respectively. Legend: 42 – tundra, 14 – larch forests, 36 – needle-leaf forests, 13 – summer-green broad-leaved forests, 4 – evergreen broad-leaved forests, 8 – tropical rainforests, 6 – deserts, 27 – semi-desert scrubs, 7 – shrublands, 15 – grasslands, 10 – subhumid woodlands, 3 – raingreen forests.
Mentions: The method of building normative data employed in this study (see Methods) works against estimates suggesting too large shifts in mean values. These estimates form the pool of alternative data. The series of alternative data (Additional files 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17) shows large variations of totals: from 64 to 91.7 PgC y-1. In the final version (Additional file 17), the total is 71.4 PgC y-1 and sub-totals depart widely from the Miami model projections (Figure 3) implying an alternative global pattern of productivity (Figure 4). This pattern may be characterized in general as "seasonality sensitive". The productivity of larch forests (14) is comparable to that of taiga (36), and the productivity of rain-green forests (3) is comparable to that of tropical rainforests (8), emphasizing that conditions during the growing season, not during the whole year, are crucial.

Bottom Line: At the same time we call attention to the emerging alternative: the global potential for net primary production of biomass may be as high as 70 PgC y-1, the productivity of larch forest zone may be comparable to the productivity of taiga zone, and the productivity of rain-green forest zone may be comparable to the productivity of tropical rainforest zone.The departure from Miami model's worldview mentioned above cannot be simply ignored.It requires thorough examination using modern observational tools and techniques for model-data fusion.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Office for Global Environmental Database, Center for Global Environmental Research, National Institute for Environmental Studies, Onogawa 16-2, Tsukuba, Japan. g.alexandrov@nies.go.jp.

ABSTRACT

Background: The biosphere models of terrestrial productivity are essential for projecting climate change and assessing mitigation and adaptation options. Many of them have been developed in connection to the International Geosphere-Biosphere Program (IGBP) that backs the work of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). In the end of 1990s, IGBP sponsored release of a data set summarizing the model outputs and setting certain norms for estimates of terrestrial productivity. Since a number of new models and new versions of old models were developed during the past decade, these normative data require updating.

Results: Here, we provide the series of updates that reflects evolution of biosphere models and demonstrates evolutional stability of the global and regional estimates of terrestrial productivity. Most of them fit well the long-living Miami model. At the same time we call attention to the emerging alternative: the global potential for net primary production of biomass may be as high as 70 PgC y-1, the productivity of larch forest zone may be comparable to the productivity of taiga zone, and the productivity of rain-green forest zone may be comparable to the productivity of tropical rainforest zone.

Conclusion: The departure from Miami model's worldview mentioned above cannot be simply ignored. It requires thorough examination using modern observational tools and techniques for model-data fusion. Stability of normative knowledge is not its ultimate goal - the norms for estimates of terrestrial productivity must be evidence-based.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus