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Identification of the occurrence and pattern of masseter muscle activities during sleep using EMG and accelerometer systems.

Yoshimi H, Sasaguri K, Tamaki K, Sato S - Head Face Med (2009)

Bottom Line: The system consisted of a 2-axis accelerometer, electroencephalography and electromyography.Results showed that grinding (59.5%) was most common, followed by clenching (35.6%) based on relative activity to maximum voluntary contraction (%MVC), whereas tapping was only (4.9%).It was concluded that the tapping, clenching, and grinding movement of the mandible could be effectively differentiated by the new system and sleep bruxism was predominantly perceived as clenching and grinding, which varied between individuals.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Craniofacial Growth and Development Dentistry, Research Institute of Occlusion Medicine, Research Center of Brain and Oral Science, Kanagawa, Japan. info@yoshimishika.com

ABSTRACT

Background: Sleep bruxism has been described as a combination of different orofacial motor activities that include grinding, clenching and tapping, although accurate distribution of the activities still remains to be clarified.

Methods: We developed a new system for analyzing sleep bruxism to examine the muscle activities and mandibular movement patterns during sleep bruxism. The system consisted of a 2-axis accelerometer, electroencephalography and electromyography. Nineteen healthy volunteers were recruited and screened to evaluate sleep bruxism in the sleep laboratory.

Results: The new system could easily distinguish the different patterns of bruxism movement of the mandible and the body movement. Results showed that grinding (59.5%) was most common, followed by clenching (35.6%) based on relative activity to maximum voluntary contraction (%MVC), whereas tapping was only (4.9%).

Conclusion: It was concluded that the tapping, clenching, and grinding movement of the mandible could be effectively differentiated by the new system and sleep bruxism was predominantly perceived as clenching and grinding, which varied between individuals.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Relationship between the muscle activity (%MVC) and the bruxism length (sec/hour) duration. Majority of the volunteers were displayed in the lower left quadrant which means that muscle activity (%MVC) and bruxism event duration were not as high as in the volunteers.
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Figure 6: Relationship between the muscle activity (%MVC) and the bruxism length (sec/hour) duration. Majority of the volunteers were displayed in the lower left quadrant which means that muscle activity (%MVC) and bruxism event duration were not as high as in the volunteers.

Mentions: Fig. 6 shows the relationship between the masseter-muscle activity (%MVC) and bruxism-event duration. The majority of volunteers are plotted in the lower left quadrant, indicating that the muscle activity (%MVC) and bruxism-event duration were not as high as the average values, 55.1 ± 58.4 (%MVC) and 108.0 ± 90.4(sec/hour), respectively. Seventy-nine percent of volunteers were within one standard deviation, while the values of volunteers 14, 17, 18 and 19 were out of the average range.


Identification of the occurrence and pattern of masseter muscle activities during sleep using EMG and accelerometer systems.

Yoshimi H, Sasaguri K, Tamaki K, Sato S - Head Face Med (2009)

Relationship between the muscle activity (%MVC) and the bruxism length (sec/hour) duration. Majority of the volunteers were displayed in the lower left quadrant which means that muscle activity (%MVC) and bruxism event duration were not as high as in the volunteers.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2654433&req=5

Figure 6: Relationship between the muscle activity (%MVC) and the bruxism length (sec/hour) duration. Majority of the volunteers were displayed in the lower left quadrant which means that muscle activity (%MVC) and bruxism event duration were not as high as in the volunteers.
Mentions: Fig. 6 shows the relationship between the masseter-muscle activity (%MVC) and bruxism-event duration. The majority of volunteers are plotted in the lower left quadrant, indicating that the muscle activity (%MVC) and bruxism-event duration were not as high as the average values, 55.1 ± 58.4 (%MVC) and 108.0 ± 90.4(sec/hour), respectively. Seventy-nine percent of volunteers were within one standard deviation, while the values of volunteers 14, 17, 18 and 19 were out of the average range.

Bottom Line: The system consisted of a 2-axis accelerometer, electroencephalography and electromyography.Results showed that grinding (59.5%) was most common, followed by clenching (35.6%) based on relative activity to maximum voluntary contraction (%MVC), whereas tapping was only (4.9%).It was concluded that the tapping, clenching, and grinding movement of the mandible could be effectively differentiated by the new system and sleep bruxism was predominantly perceived as clenching and grinding, which varied between individuals.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Craniofacial Growth and Development Dentistry, Research Institute of Occlusion Medicine, Research Center of Brain and Oral Science, Kanagawa, Japan. info@yoshimishika.com

ABSTRACT

Background: Sleep bruxism has been described as a combination of different orofacial motor activities that include grinding, clenching and tapping, although accurate distribution of the activities still remains to be clarified.

Methods: We developed a new system for analyzing sleep bruxism to examine the muscle activities and mandibular movement patterns during sleep bruxism. The system consisted of a 2-axis accelerometer, electroencephalography and electromyography. Nineteen healthy volunteers were recruited and screened to evaluate sleep bruxism in the sleep laboratory.

Results: The new system could easily distinguish the different patterns of bruxism movement of the mandible and the body movement. Results showed that grinding (59.5%) was most common, followed by clenching (35.6%) based on relative activity to maximum voluntary contraction (%MVC), whereas tapping was only (4.9%).

Conclusion: It was concluded that the tapping, clenching, and grinding movement of the mandible could be effectively differentiated by the new system and sleep bruxism was predominantly perceived as clenching and grinding, which varied between individuals.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus