Limits...
The spatial and temporal construction of confidence in the visual scene.

Graziano M, Sigman M - PLoS ONE (2009)

Bottom Line: Here we compared the dynamics of objective performance with a measure of subjective report and we observed that 1) Objective performance beyond explicit subjective reports (blindsight) was significantly more pronounced within a short temporal interval and within specific locations of the visual field which were robust across sessions 2) High confidence errors (false beliefs) were largely confined to a small spatial window neighboring the cue.The size of this window did not change in time 3) Subjective confidence showed a moderate but consistent decrease with time, independent of all other experimental factors.Our study allowed us to asses quantitatively the temporal and spatial access to an objective response and to subjective reports.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Physics Department, Integrative Neuroscience Laboratory, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires, Argentina.

ABSTRACT
Human subjects can report many items of a cluttered field a few hundred milliseconds after stimulus presentation. This memory decays rapidly and after a second only 3 or 4 items can be stored in working memory. Here we compared the dynamics of objective performance with a measure of subjective report and we observed that 1) Objective performance beyond explicit subjective reports (blindsight) was significantly more pronounced within a short temporal interval and within specific locations of the visual field which were robust across sessions 2) High confidence errors (false beliefs) were largely confined to a small spatial window neighboring the cue. The size of this window did not change in time 3) Subjective confidence showed a moderate but consistent decrease with time, independent of all other experimental factors. Our study allowed us to asses quantitatively the temporal and spatial access to an objective response and to subjective reports.

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

Correlations and Dissociations between objective and subjective reports.A) Confidence reports were grouped in four percentile groups of confidence (25, 50, 75 and 100% - blue, orange, yellow and green traces) for each individual session and participant. B) Subjective confidence distribution for incorrect responses (black dotted line). The blue and green traces indicate the low-confidence and high-confidence error trials. C) Distance between the responded letter and the cue when the responded letter was a distractor for high- confidence (green) and low-confidence (blue) errors. The inset shows that this distribution does not change for short and long ISIs. D) Mean performance increased with subject's confidence report. At low confidence, responses were more accurate for short ISI values. E and F) Control experiment in which subjects reported in two subsequent screens the confidence in the position of the seen letter relative to the cue and of the identity of the seen letter for correct (E) and error (F) trials.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2654151&req=5

pone-0004909-g002: Correlations and Dissociations between objective and subjective reports.A) Confidence reports were grouped in four percentile groups of confidence (25, 50, 75 and 100% - blue, orange, yellow and green traces) for each individual session and participant. B) Subjective confidence distribution for incorrect responses (black dotted line). The blue and green traces indicate the low-confidence and high-confidence error trials. C) Distance between the responded letter and the cue when the responded letter was a distractor for high- confidence (green) and low-confidence (blue) errors. The inset shows that this distribution does not change for short and long ISIs. D) Mean performance increased with subject's confidence report. At low confidence, responses were more accurate for short ISI values. E and F) Control experiment in which subjects reported in two subsequent screens the confidence in the position of the seen letter relative to the cue and of the identity of the seen letter for correct (E) and error (F) trials.

Mentions: To quantify the relation between objective performance (accuracy of the response) and participant's subjective confidence report, we binned the distribution of confidence report in four percentile groups (25, 50, 75 and 100%), for each individual session and participant (Figure 2A). Objective performance strongly correlated with subjective confidence report (Figure 2D). An ANOVA analysis showed a very significant effect of subjective confidence on performance (F3, 8.13 = 47.45, P = 0.0026).


The spatial and temporal construction of confidence in the visual scene.

Graziano M, Sigman M - PLoS ONE (2009)

Correlations and Dissociations between objective and subjective reports.A) Confidence reports were grouped in four percentile groups of confidence (25, 50, 75 and 100% - blue, orange, yellow and green traces) for each individual session and participant. B) Subjective confidence distribution for incorrect responses (black dotted line). The blue and green traces indicate the low-confidence and high-confidence error trials. C) Distance between the responded letter and the cue when the responded letter was a distractor for high- confidence (green) and low-confidence (blue) errors. The inset shows that this distribution does not change for short and long ISIs. D) Mean performance increased with subject's confidence report. At low confidence, responses were more accurate for short ISI values. E and F) Control experiment in which subjects reported in two subsequent screens the confidence in the position of the seen letter relative to the cue and of the identity of the seen letter for correct (E) and error (F) trials.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2654151&req=5

pone-0004909-g002: Correlations and Dissociations between objective and subjective reports.A) Confidence reports were grouped in four percentile groups of confidence (25, 50, 75 and 100% - blue, orange, yellow and green traces) for each individual session and participant. B) Subjective confidence distribution for incorrect responses (black dotted line). The blue and green traces indicate the low-confidence and high-confidence error trials. C) Distance between the responded letter and the cue when the responded letter was a distractor for high- confidence (green) and low-confidence (blue) errors. The inset shows that this distribution does not change for short and long ISIs. D) Mean performance increased with subject's confidence report. At low confidence, responses were more accurate for short ISI values. E and F) Control experiment in which subjects reported in two subsequent screens the confidence in the position of the seen letter relative to the cue and of the identity of the seen letter for correct (E) and error (F) trials.
Mentions: To quantify the relation between objective performance (accuracy of the response) and participant's subjective confidence report, we binned the distribution of confidence report in four percentile groups (25, 50, 75 and 100%), for each individual session and participant (Figure 2A). Objective performance strongly correlated with subjective confidence report (Figure 2D). An ANOVA analysis showed a very significant effect of subjective confidence on performance (F3, 8.13 = 47.45, P = 0.0026).

Bottom Line: Here we compared the dynamics of objective performance with a measure of subjective report and we observed that 1) Objective performance beyond explicit subjective reports (blindsight) was significantly more pronounced within a short temporal interval and within specific locations of the visual field which were robust across sessions 2) High confidence errors (false beliefs) were largely confined to a small spatial window neighboring the cue.The size of this window did not change in time 3) Subjective confidence showed a moderate but consistent decrease with time, independent of all other experimental factors.Our study allowed us to asses quantitatively the temporal and spatial access to an objective response and to subjective reports.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Physics Department, Integrative Neuroscience Laboratory, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires, Argentina.

ABSTRACT
Human subjects can report many items of a cluttered field a few hundred milliseconds after stimulus presentation. This memory decays rapidly and after a second only 3 or 4 items can be stored in working memory. Here we compared the dynamics of objective performance with a measure of subjective report and we observed that 1) Objective performance beyond explicit subjective reports (blindsight) was significantly more pronounced within a short temporal interval and within specific locations of the visual field which were robust across sessions 2) High confidence errors (false beliefs) were largely confined to a small spatial window neighboring the cue. The size of this window did not change in time 3) Subjective confidence showed a moderate but consistent decrease with time, independent of all other experimental factors. Our study allowed us to asses quantitatively the temporal and spatial access to an objective response and to subjective reports.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus