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Measuring trends in age at first sex and age at marriage in Manicaland, Zimbabwe.

Cremin I, Mushati P, Hallett T, Mupambireyi Z, Nyamukapa C, Garnett GP, Gregson S - Sex Transm Infect (2009)

Bottom Line: High levels of reports of both age at first sex and age at marriage among those attending multiple surveys were found to be unreliable.Excluding reports identified as unreliable from these analyses did not alter the observed trends in either age at first sex or age at marriage.Although many reports of age at first sex and age at marriage were found to be unreliable, inclusion of such reports did not result in artificial generation or suppression of trends.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Infectious Disease Epidemiology, Imperial College London, London, UK. ide.cremin05@imperial.ac.uk

ABSTRACT

Objective: To identify reporting biases and to determine the influence of inconsistent reporting on observed trends in the timing of age at first sex and age at marriage.

Methods: Longitudinal data from three rounds of a population-based cohort in eastern Zimbabwe were analysed. Reports of age at first sex and age at marriage from 6837 individuals attending multiple rounds were classified according to consistency. Survival analysis was used to identify trends in the timing of first sex and marriage.

Results: In this population, women initiate sex and enter marriage at younger ages than men but spend much less time between first sex and marriage. Among those surveyed between 1998 and 2005, median ages at first sex and first marriage were 18.5 years and 21.4 years for men and 18.2 years and 18.5 years, respectively, for women aged 15-54 years. High levels of reports of both age at first sex and age at marriage among those attending multiple surveys were found to be unreliable. Excluding reports identified as unreliable from these analyses did not alter the observed trends in either age at first sex or age at marriage. Tracing birth cohorts as they aged revealed reporting biases, particularly among the youngest cohorts. Comparisons by birth cohorts, which span a period of >40 years, indicate that median age at first sex has remained constant over time for women but has declined gradually for men.

Conclusions: Although many reports of age at first sex and age at marriage were found to be unreliable, inclusion of such reports did not result in artificial generation or suppression of trends.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Median estimates of reported age at first sex by 5-year birth cohort for (A) men and (B) women. IQR, interquartile range. Data include all reports after corrections and estimations for inconsistent reports. The upper value of the IQR could not be calculated for those born after 1975 as 60% of men and 60% of women born after 1975 reported not having had sex.
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U9G-85-S1-0034-f03: Median estimates of reported age at first sex by 5-year birth cohort for (A) men and (B) women. IQR, interquartile range. Data include all reports after corrections and estimations for inconsistent reports. The upper value of the IQR could not be calculated for those born after 1975 as 60% of men and 60% of women born after 1975 reported not having had sex.

Mentions: Plotting medians by birth cohort indicated that age at first sex declined gradually among men, from 20.7 years for those born before 1955 to 19.1 years for those born after 1975 (fig 3A). For women the median age at first sex remained relatively constant between 19.2 and 19.0 years (fig 3B).


Measuring trends in age at first sex and age at marriage in Manicaland, Zimbabwe.

Cremin I, Mushati P, Hallett T, Mupambireyi Z, Nyamukapa C, Garnett GP, Gregson S - Sex Transm Infect (2009)

Median estimates of reported age at first sex by 5-year birth cohort for (A) men and (B) women. IQR, interquartile range. Data include all reports after corrections and estimations for inconsistent reports. The upper value of the IQR could not be calculated for those born after 1975 as 60% of men and 60% of women born after 1975 reported not having had sex.
© Copyright Policy - openaccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2654143&req=5

U9G-85-S1-0034-f03: Median estimates of reported age at first sex by 5-year birth cohort for (A) men and (B) women. IQR, interquartile range. Data include all reports after corrections and estimations for inconsistent reports. The upper value of the IQR could not be calculated for those born after 1975 as 60% of men and 60% of women born after 1975 reported not having had sex.
Mentions: Plotting medians by birth cohort indicated that age at first sex declined gradually among men, from 20.7 years for those born before 1955 to 19.1 years for those born after 1975 (fig 3A). For women the median age at first sex remained relatively constant between 19.2 and 19.0 years (fig 3B).

Bottom Line: High levels of reports of both age at first sex and age at marriage among those attending multiple surveys were found to be unreliable.Excluding reports identified as unreliable from these analyses did not alter the observed trends in either age at first sex or age at marriage.Although many reports of age at first sex and age at marriage were found to be unreliable, inclusion of such reports did not result in artificial generation or suppression of trends.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Infectious Disease Epidemiology, Imperial College London, London, UK. ide.cremin05@imperial.ac.uk

ABSTRACT

Objective: To identify reporting biases and to determine the influence of inconsistent reporting on observed trends in the timing of age at first sex and age at marriage.

Methods: Longitudinal data from three rounds of a population-based cohort in eastern Zimbabwe were analysed. Reports of age at first sex and age at marriage from 6837 individuals attending multiple rounds were classified according to consistency. Survival analysis was used to identify trends in the timing of first sex and marriage.

Results: In this population, women initiate sex and enter marriage at younger ages than men but spend much less time between first sex and marriage. Among those surveyed between 1998 and 2005, median ages at first sex and first marriage were 18.5 years and 21.4 years for men and 18.2 years and 18.5 years, respectively, for women aged 15-54 years. High levels of reports of both age at first sex and age at marriage among those attending multiple surveys were found to be unreliable. Excluding reports identified as unreliable from these analyses did not alter the observed trends in either age at first sex or age at marriage. Tracing birth cohorts as they aged revealed reporting biases, particularly among the youngest cohorts. Comparisons by birth cohorts, which span a period of >40 years, indicate that median age at first sex has remained constant over time for women but has declined gradually for men.

Conclusions: Although many reports of age at first sex and age at marriage were found to be unreliable, inclusion of such reports did not result in artificial generation or suppression of trends.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus