Limits...
Relationship between activity in human primary motor cortex during action observation and the mirror neuron system.

Kilner JM, Marchant JL, Frith CD - PLoS ONE (2009)

Bottom Line: We asked subjects to observe videos of an actor making a variety of arm movements.This pattern of attenuation was driven by the side of the screen on which the observed movement occurred and not by the hand that was observed moving.These results are discussed in terms of the firing patterns of mirror neurons in F5 which have been reported to have similar properties.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: The Wellcome Trust Centre for Neuroimaging, London, London, United Kingdom. j.kilner@fil.ion.ucl.ac.uk

ABSTRACT
The attenuation of the beta cortical oscillations during action observation has been interpreted as evidence of a mirror neuron system (MNS) in humans. Here we investigated the modulation of beta cortical oscillations with the viewpoint of an observed action. We asked subjects to observe videos of an actor making a variety of arm movements. We show that when subjects were observing arm movements there was a significant modulation of beta oscillations overlying left and right sensorimotor cortices. This pattern of attenuation was driven by the side of the screen on which the observed movement occurred and not by the hand that was observed moving. These results are discussed in terms of the firing patterns of mirror neurons in F5 which have been reported to have similar properties.

Show MeSH
Experimental design.Figure 4a stills from the videos of experiment 2 showing the 2×2 factorial design collapsed across the factors goal. The factors depicted here are hand moved and the viewpoint. Figure 4b shows the time course of a typical trial.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2654140&req=5

pone-0004925-g004: Experimental design.Figure 4a stills from the videos of experiment 2 showing the 2×2 factorial design collapsed across the factors goal. The factors depicted here are hand moved and the viewpoint. Figure 4b shows the time course of a typical trial.

Mentions: These analyses revealed two things. First, beta power was more attenuated in the left hemisphere than the right hemisphere irrespective of the movement observed. Second, beta power was more attenuated in the right hemisphere when subjects observed a movement of the right hand and conversely, when the actor was facing forward, beta power was more greatly attenuated in the left hemisphere when subjects observed a movement of the left hand. However, the results of experiment 1 are problematic to interpret as the hand observed moving was always on one side of the screen. In other words, a movement of the right hand always occurred on the left of the screen and a movement of the left hand always occurred on the right of the screen. In experiment 2 this was controlled for as the movement of the left and right hands occurred on both the left and right of the screen (Fig. 4A). Analysis of the modulation of beta power in experiment 2 would reveal whether the effects observed in experiment 1 were being driven by the hand observed or by the side of the screen on which the movement occurred.


Relationship between activity in human primary motor cortex during action observation and the mirror neuron system.

Kilner JM, Marchant JL, Frith CD - PLoS ONE (2009)

Experimental design.Figure 4a stills from the videos of experiment 2 showing the 2×2 factorial design collapsed across the factors goal. The factors depicted here are hand moved and the viewpoint. Figure 4b shows the time course of a typical trial.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2654140&req=5

pone-0004925-g004: Experimental design.Figure 4a stills from the videos of experiment 2 showing the 2×2 factorial design collapsed across the factors goal. The factors depicted here are hand moved and the viewpoint. Figure 4b shows the time course of a typical trial.
Mentions: These analyses revealed two things. First, beta power was more attenuated in the left hemisphere than the right hemisphere irrespective of the movement observed. Second, beta power was more attenuated in the right hemisphere when subjects observed a movement of the right hand and conversely, when the actor was facing forward, beta power was more greatly attenuated in the left hemisphere when subjects observed a movement of the left hand. However, the results of experiment 1 are problematic to interpret as the hand observed moving was always on one side of the screen. In other words, a movement of the right hand always occurred on the left of the screen and a movement of the left hand always occurred on the right of the screen. In experiment 2 this was controlled for as the movement of the left and right hands occurred on both the left and right of the screen (Fig. 4A). Analysis of the modulation of beta power in experiment 2 would reveal whether the effects observed in experiment 1 were being driven by the hand observed or by the side of the screen on which the movement occurred.

Bottom Line: We asked subjects to observe videos of an actor making a variety of arm movements.This pattern of attenuation was driven by the side of the screen on which the observed movement occurred and not by the hand that was observed moving.These results are discussed in terms of the firing patterns of mirror neurons in F5 which have been reported to have similar properties.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: The Wellcome Trust Centre for Neuroimaging, London, London, United Kingdom. j.kilner@fil.ion.ucl.ac.uk

ABSTRACT
The attenuation of the beta cortical oscillations during action observation has been interpreted as evidence of a mirror neuron system (MNS) in humans. Here we investigated the modulation of beta cortical oscillations with the viewpoint of an observed action. We asked subjects to observe videos of an actor making a variety of arm movements. We show that when subjects were observing arm movements there was a significant modulation of beta oscillations overlying left and right sensorimotor cortices. This pattern of attenuation was driven by the side of the screen on which the observed movement occurred and not by the hand that was observed moving. These results are discussed in terms of the firing patterns of mirror neurons in F5 which have been reported to have similar properties.

Show MeSH