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Effects of dietary carotenoids on mouse lung genomic profiles and their modulatory effects on short-term cigarette smoke exposures.

Aung HH, Vasu VT, Valacchi G, Corbacho AM, Kota RS, Lim Y, Obermueller-Jevic UC, Packer L, Cross CE, Gohil K - Genes Nutr (2008)

Bottom Line: Four weeks of dietary supplementations results in plasma and lung carotenoid (CAR) concentrations that approximated the levels detected in humans.Bioactivity of the CARs was determined by assaying their effects on the activity of the lung transcriptome (~8,500 mRNAs).These genes encoded inflammatory-immune proteins.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Center for Comparative Respiratory Biology and Medicine, Clinical Nutrition and Vascular Medicine, Genome and Biomedical Sciences Facility, University of California, 6404A, 451 East Health Sciences Drive, Davis, CA, 95616, USA.

ABSTRACT
Male C57BL/6 mice were fed diets supplemented with either beta-carotene (BC) or lycopene (LY) that were formulated for human consumption. Four weeks of dietary supplementations results in plasma and lung carotenoid (CAR) concentrations that approximated the levels detected in humans. Bioactivity of the CARs was determined by assaying their effects on the activity of the lung transcriptome (~8,500 mRNAs). Both CARs activated the cytochrome P450 1A1 gene but only BC induced the retinol dehydrogenase gene. The contrasting effects of the two CARs on the lung transcriptome were further uncovered in mice exposed to cigarette smoke (CS) for 3 days; only LY activated ~50 genes detected in the lungs of CS-exposed mice. These genes encoded inflammatory-immune proteins. Our data suggest that mice offer a viable in vivo model for studying bioactivities of dietary CARs and their modulatory effects on lung genomic expression in both health and after exposure to CS toxicants.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Selective induction of lecithin-retinol acyl transferase only in mice fed the BC-supplemented diet. The data obtained from GeneChip expression analysis show signal intensity for the two acyl transferases in the lungs of air breathing mice fed the 3 assigned diets
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Fig4: Selective induction of lecithin-retinol acyl transferase only in mice fed the BC-supplemented diet. The data obtained from GeneChip expression analysis show signal intensity for the two acyl transferases in the lungs of air breathing mice fed the 3 assigned diets

Mentions: Several genes were modulated by BC but not LY (Table 4). These data suggest that the GeneChip assay can discriminate between the in vivo actions of the two CARs. The most noteworthy difference was the induction of the gene encoding lecithin-retinol acyltransferase (Lrat), which is a retinol esterifying enzyme. Fig. 4 shows GeneChip data for the expression of Lrat and a related acyltransferase to illustrate the specific induction of Lrat in the lungs of mice fed only the BC diet. Additional genes whose induction was similar to that of Lrat included genes encoding transcription factors such as period 2 (Per2) and hepatic leukemia factor (Hlf). BC diet supplementation also up-regulated the expression of aquaporin-3 (Aqp3) and down-regulated that of sodium channel (Scn8a) genes. Two genes of unknown functions were repressed by LY but unaffected by BC.Fig. 4


Effects of dietary carotenoids on mouse lung genomic profiles and their modulatory effects on short-term cigarette smoke exposures.

Aung HH, Vasu VT, Valacchi G, Corbacho AM, Kota RS, Lim Y, Obermueller-Jevic UC, Packer L, Cross CE, Gohil K - Genes Nutr (2008)

Selective induction of lecithin-retinol acyl transferase only in mice fed the BC-supplemented diet. The data obtained from GeneChip expression analysis show signal intensity for the two acyl transferases in the lungs of air breathing mice fed the 3 assigned diets
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2654053&req=5

Fig4: Selective induction of lecithin-retinol acyl transferase only in mice fed the BC-supplemented diet. The data obtained from GeneChip expression analysis show signal intensity for the two acyl transferases in the lungs of air breathing mice fed the 3 assigned diets
Mentions: Several genes were modulated by BC but not LY (Table 4). These data suggest that the GeneChip assay can discriminate between the in vivo actions of the two CARs. The most noteworthy difference was the induction of the gene encoding lecithin-retinol acyltransferase (Lrat), which is a retinol esterifying enzyme. Fig. 4 shows GeneChip data for the expression of Lrat and a related acyltransferase to illustrate the specific induction of Lrat in the lungs of mice fed only the BC diet. Additional genes whose induction was similar to that of Lrat included genes encoding transcription factors such as period 2 (Per2) and hepatic leukemia factor (Hlf). BC diet supplementation also up-regulated the expression of aquaporin-3 (Aqp3) and down-regulated that of sodium channel (Scn8a) genes. Two genes of unknown functions were repressed by LY but unaffected by BC.Fig. 4

Bottom Line: Four weeks of dietary supplementations results in plasma and lung carotenoid (CAR) concentrations that approximated the levels detected in humans.Bioactivity of the CARs was determined by assaying their effects on the activity of the lung transcriptome (~8,500 mRNAs).These genes encoded inflammatory-immune proteins.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Center for Comparative Respiratory Biology and Medicine, Clinical Nutrition and Vascular Medicine, Genome and Biomedical Sciences Facility, University of California, 6404A, 451 East Health Sciences Drive, Davis, CA, 95616, USA.

ABSTRACT
Male C57BL/6 mice were fed diets supplemented with either beta-carotene (BC) or lycopene (LY) that were formulated for human consumption. Four weeks of dietary supplementations results in plasma and lung carotenoid (CAR) concentrations that approximated the levels detected in humans. Bioactivity of the CARs was determined by assaying their effects on the activity of the lung transcriptome (~8,500 mRNAs). Both CARs activated the cytochrome P450 1A1 gene but only BC induced the retinol dehydrogenase gene. The contrasting effects of the two CARs on the lung transcriptome were further uncovered in mice exposed to cigarette smoke (CS) for 3 days; only LY activated ~50 genes detected in the lungs of CS-exposed mice. These genes encoded inflammatory-immune proteins. Our data suggest that mice offer a viable in vivo model for studying bioactivities of dietary CARs and their modulatory effects on lung genomic expression in both health and after exposure to CS toxicants.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus