Limits...
Measuring health-related quality of life in tuberculosis: a systematic review.

Guo N, Marra F, Marra CA - Health Qual Life Outcomes (2009)

Bottom Line: A systematic literature search from 1981 to 2008 was performed through a number of electronic databases as well as a manual search.Overall, the anti-tuberculosis treatment had a positive effect of improving patients' quality of life; their physical health tended to recover more quickly than the mental well-being.However, after the patients successfully completed treatment and were microbiologically 'cured', their quality of life remained significantly worse than the general population.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Collaboration for Outcomes Research and Evaluation, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada. naguo@interchange.ubc.ca

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Tuberculosis remains a major public health problem worldwide. In recent years, increasing efforts have been dedicated to assessing the health-related quality of life experienced by people infected with tuberculosis. The objectives of this study were to better understand the impact of tuberculosis and its treatment on people's quality of life, and to review quality of life instruments used in current tuberculosis research.

Methods: A systematic literature search from 1981 to 2008 was performed through a number of electronic databases as well as a manual search. Eligible studies assessed multi-dimensional quality of life in people with tuberculosis disease or infection using standardized instruments. Results of the included studies were summarized qualitatively.

Results: Twelve original studies met our criteria for inclusion. A wide range of quality of life instruments were involved, and the Short-Form 36 was most commonly used. A validated tuberculosis-specific quality of life instrument was not located. The findings showed that tuberculosis had a substantial and encompassing impact on patients' quality of life. Overall, the anti-tuberculosis treatment had a positive effect of improving patients' quality of life; their physical health tended to recover more quickly than the mental well-being. However, after the patients successfully completed treatment and were microbiologically 'cured', their quality of life remained significantly worse than the general population.

Conclusion: Tuberculosis has substantially adverse impacts on patients' quality of life, which persist after microbiological 'cure'. A variety of instruments were used to assess quality of life in tuberculosis and there has been no well-established tuberculosis-specific instrument, making it difficult to fully understand the impact of the illness.

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2651863&req=5

Mentions: A systematic literature search was performed using the following electronic databases: Medline (1950-present), EMBASE (1980-present), Cochrane Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), CINAHL, PsycINFO, and HaPI (1985-present). Key word searching and/or subject searching were performed, if applicable. The following keywords were used: tuberculosis (TB), Quality of Life (QoL), Quality Adjusted Life Years (QALY), health utility, health status, life quality, and well-being. The limit feature was used to select human studies published between 1981 and 2008 written in English or Chinese (traditional or simplified). The last time electronic database search was conducted during July 22, 2008. The reference sections of the following key journals were manually searched for relevant articles: International Journal of Tuberculosis and Lung Disease, Chest, Quality of Life Research, and Health and Quality of Life Outcomes. Reference lists of included studies, review articles, letters, and comments were checked afterwards. We did not contact the authors of identified studies or relevant experts to locate unpublished studies. Each stage of the literature searching process is illustrated in Figure 1.


Measuring health-related quality of life in tuberculosis: a systematic review.

Guo N, Marra F, Marra CA - Health Qual Life Outcomes (2009)

© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2651863&req=5

Mentions: A systematic literature search was performed using the following electronic databases: Medline (1950-present), EMBASE (1980-present), Cochrane Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), CINAHL, PsycINFO, and HaPI (1985-present). Key word searching and/or subject searching were performed, if applicable. The following keywords were used: tuberculosis (TB), Quality of Life (QoL), Quality Adjusted Life Years (QALY), health utility, health status, life quality, and well-being. The limit feature was used to select human studies published between 1981 and 2008 written in English or Chinese (traditional or simplified). The last time electronic database search was conducted during July 22, 2008. The reference sections of the following key journals were manually searched for relevant articles: International Journal of Tuberculosis and Lung Disease, Chest, Quality of Life Research, and Health and Quality of Life Outcomes. Reference lists of included studies, review articles, letters, and comments were checked afterwards. We did not contact the authors of identified studies or relevant experts to locate unpublished studies. Each stage of the literature searching process is illustrated in Figure 1.

Bottom Line: A systematic literature search from 1981 to 2008 was performed through a number of electronic databases as well as a manual search.Overall, the anti-tuberculosis treatment had a positive effect of improving patients' quality of life; their physical health tended to recover more quickly than the mental well-being.However, after the patients successfully completed treatment and were microbiologically 'cured', their quality of life remained significantly worse than the general population.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Collaboration for Outcomes Research and Evaluation, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada. naguo@interchange.ubc.ca

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Tuberculosis remains a major public health problem worldwide. In recent years, increasing efforts have been dedicated to assessing the health-related quality of life experienced by people infected with tuberculosis. The objectives of this study were to better understand the impact of tuberculosis and its treatment on people's quality of life, and to review quality of life instruments used in current tuberculosis research.

Methods: A systematic literature search from 1981 to 2008 was performed through a number of electronic databases as well as a manual search. Eligible studies assessed multi-dimensional quality of life in people with tuberculosis disease or infection using standardized instruments. Results of the included studies were summarized qualitatively.

Results: Twelve original studies met our criteria for inclusion. A wide range of quality of life instruments were involved, and the Short-Form 36 was most commonly used. A validated tuberculosis-specific quality of life instrument was not located. The findings showed that tuberculosis had a substantial and encompassing impact on patients' quality of life. Overall, the anti-tuberculosis treatment had a positive effect of improving patients' quality of life; their physical health tended to recover more quickly than the mental well-being. However, after the patients successfully completed treatment and were microbiologically 'cured', their quality of life remained significantly worse than the general population.

Conclusion: Tuberculosis has substantially adverse impacts on patients' quality of life, which persist after microbiological 'cure'. A variety of instruments were used to assess quality of life in tuberculosis and there has been no well-established tuberculosis-specific instrument, making it difficult to fully understand the impact of the illness.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus