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A new on-axis multimode spectrometer for the macromolecular crystallography beamlines of the Swiss Light Source.

Owen RL, Pearson AR, Meents A, Boehler P, Thominet V, Schulze-Briese C - J Synchrotron Radiat (2009)

Bottom Line: In situ spectroscopic methods such as UV-Vis absorption and (resonance) Raman can provide this, and can also provide a means of detecting X-ray-induced changes.Here, preliminary results are introduced from an on-axis UV-Vis absorption and Raman multimode spectrometer currently being integrated into the beamline environment at X10SA of the Swiss Light Source.The continuing development of the spectrometer is also outlined.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Swiss Light Source, Paul Scherrer Institute, CH-5232 Villigen PSI, Switzerland.

ABSTRACT
X-ray crystallography at third-generation synchrotron sources permits tremendous insight into the three-dimensional structure of macromolecules. Additional information is, however, often required to aid the transition from structure to function. In situ spectroscopic methods such as UV-Vis absorption and (resonance) Raman can provide this, and can also provide a means of detecting X-ray-induced changes. Here, preliminary results are introduced from an on-axis UV-Vis absorption and Raman multimode spectrometer currently being integrated into the beamline environment at X10SA of the Swiss Light Source. The continuing development of the spectrometer is also outlined.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

The effect of drilling on the optical and X-ray transmission properties of the Schwarzschild objective. (a) Ray traces calculated using the ray-tracing software Zemax (http://www.zemax.com/) from the focal point (blue) and a point a distance δ off-axis (green) through the system are shown. Translation of a knife-edge across the X-ray beam allows the profile to be determined with and without the spectroscopy objective in place; no change is observed in either (b) the horizontal or vertical (data not shown) directions.
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fig4: The effect of drilling on the optical and X-ray transmission properties of the Schwarzschild objective. (a) Ray traces calculated using the ray-tracing software Zemax (http://www.zemax.com/) from the focal point (blue) and a point a distance δ off-axis (green) through the system are shown. Translation of a knife-edge across the X-ray beam allows the profile to be determined with and without the spectroscopy objective in place; no change is observed in either (b) the horizontal or vertical (data not shown) directions.

Mentions: The drilling of a 1 mm-diameter hole in the secondary mirror does not degrade the optical properties of the objective since the occluded region of this mirror is 4.6 mm in diameter. This free diameter, f d, is shown in Fig. 4(a) ▶. Of potentially greater impact on the light throughput of the system is the hole in the 45° mirror. This is illustrated by ray-tracing the light path from two points in the focal plane through the system: the focal point and a point a distance δ off-axis (shown in blue and green, respectively, in Fig. 4a ▶). Light from the focal point does not fall on this hole, although it is possible for light from the off-axis point to fall there, with the amount of light ‘lost’ increasing as a function of δ. If a value of 0.6 mm is taken for δ, corresponding to the full field of view of the objective, then the intensity of light lost is less than 2%. Holes of diameter 1 mm are large enough to allow X-rays to pass through the system even when the flexor mount is adjusted. This is illustrated in Fig. 4(b) ▶; in this case a knife-edge was scanned across the sample position with either the Schwarz­schild objective or normal on-axis viewing system lens mounted.


A new on-axis multimode spectrometer for the macromolecular crystallography beamlines of the Swiss Light Source.

Owen RL, Pearson AR, Meents A, Boehler P, Thominet V, Schulze-Briese C - J Synchrotron Radiat (2009)

The effect of drilling on the optical and X-ray transmission properties of the Schwarzschild objective. (a) Ray traces calculated using the ray-tracing software Zemax (http://www.zemax.com/) from the focal point (blue) and a point a distance δ off-axis (green) through the system are shown. Translation of a knife-edge across the X-ray beam allows the profile to be determined with and without the spectroscopy objective in place; no change is observed in either (b) the horizontal or vertical (data not shown) directions.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2651763&req=5

fig4: The effect of drilling on the optical and X-ray transmission properties of the Schwarzschild objective. (a) Ray traces calculated using the ray-tracing software Zemax (http://www.zemax.com/) from the focal point (blue) and a point a distance δ off-axis (green) through the system are shown. Translation of a knife-edge across the X-ray beam allows the profile to be determined with and without the spectroscopy objective in place; no change is observed in either (b) the horizontal or vertical (data not shown) directions.
Mentions: The drilling of a 1 mm-diameter hole in the secondary mirror does not degrade the optical properties of the objective since the occluded region of this mirror is 4.6 mm in diameter. This free diameter, f d, is shown in Fig. 4(a) ▶. Of potentially greater impact on the light throughput of the system is the hole in the 45° mirror. This is illustrated by ray-tracing the light path from two points in the focal plane through the system: the focal point and a point a distance δ off-axis (shown in blue and green, respectively, in Fig. 4a ▶). Light from the focal point does not fall on this hole, although it is possible for light from the off-axis point to fall there, with the amount of light ‘lost’ increasing as a function of δ. If a value of 0.6 mm is taken for δ, corresponding to the full field of view of the objective, then the intensity of light lost is less than 2%. Holes of diameter 1 mm are large enough to allow X-rays to pass through the system even when the flexor mount is adjusted. This is illustrated in Fig. 4(b) ▶; in this case a knife-edge was scanned across the sample position with either the Schwarz­schild objective or normal on-axis viewing system lens mounted.

Bottom Line: In situ spectroscopic methods such as UV-Vis absorption and (resonance) Raman can provide this, and can also provide a means of detecting X-ray-induced changes.Here, preliminary results are introduced from an on-axis UV-Vis absorption and Raman multimode spectrometer currently being integrated into the beamline environment at X10SA of the Swiss Light Source.The continuing development of the spectrometer is also outlined.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Swiss Light Source, Paul Scherrer Institute, CH-5232 Villigen PSI, Switzerland.

ABSTRACT
X-ray crystallography at third-generation synchrotron sources permits tremendous insight into the three-dimensional structure of macromolecules. Additional information is, however, often required to aid the transition from structure to function. In situ spectroscopic methods such as UV-Vis absorption and (resonance) Raman can provide this, and can also provide a means of detecting X-ray-induced changes. Here, preliminary results are introduced from an on-axis UV-Vis absorption and Raman multimode spectrometer currently being integrated into the beamline environment at X10SA of the Swiss Light Source. The continuing development of the spectrometer is also outlined.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus