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Function or cosmesis--what is the predominant concern in patients with nasal trauma presenting for rhinoplasty?

Philpott CM, Clark A, McKiernan DC - Eplasty (2009)

Bottom Line: A cross-sectional questionnaire study was performed in the setting of otorhinolaryngology outpatient clinics in the Cambridge University Hospitals.New patients referred to the clinic with nasal deformities secondary to recent trauma were included.To provide a control group, new patients attending for nonrhinological reasons were also asked to complete 2 questionnaires (a study specific one and the SF36).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Departments of Otorhinolaryngology, Cambridge University Hospitals, (Addenbrooke's and West Suffolk Hospitals) NHS Trusts, Cambridge, United Kingdom. carl.philpott@btinternet.com

ABSTRACT

Objectives: To assess whether or not patients receiving rhinoplasties following nasal trauma sought intervention for a functional or cosmetic reason and look at underlying psychosocial influences.

Methods: A cross-sectional questionnaire study was performed in the setting of otorhinolaryngology outpatient clinics in the Cambridge University Hospitals. New patients referred to the clinic with nasal deformities secondary to recent trauma were included. To provide a control group, new patients attending for nonrhinological reasons were also asked to complete 2 questionnaires (a study specific one and the SF36). The age range of patients was 21 to 66 years in the control group and 17 to 67 years in the rhinoplasty group.

Results: Patients attending for rhinoplasty were more likely to be male (79% vs 37%, P = .008) and have had previous nasal trauma (relative risk = 2.14, P = .0086) They neither had significantly higher scores for the SF36 or higher alcohol consumption nor were more likely to participate in contact sports than the control group nor did they differ significantly in terms of social class.

Conclusion: This study did not find evidence that posttrauma rhinoplasty patients are anymore introspective and depressed than the normal control population and that function was the predominant concern over cosmesis.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Reason for referral to the ENT clinic.
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Figure 4: Reason for referral to the ENT clinic.

Mentions: The age range of patients was 21 to 66 years in the control group and 17 to 67 years in the rhinoplasty group (means of 42 and 33, respectively). Patients referred to the outpatient clinic for consideration of rhinoplasty showed the expected positive correlation with unhappiness regarding their nasal function and cosmesis (P ≤ .001 and .0033, respectively; Table 1). They were also more likely to have injured their nose on a previous occasion (P = .0086). There was a greater proportion of males with nasal trauma in the rhinoplasty group than in the control group (P = .008). There was no evidence of a difference in social class between the 2 groups (P = .373) (Fig 2). However, the other variables considered did not demonstrate any significant differences between the 2 groups. Alcohol consumption did not have a positive correlation with nasal trauma, and binge drinking was only admitted by 4 patients although 3 of these were in the rhinoplasty group (Figs 3a and 3b). In fact there were more “teetotallers” in the rhinoplasty group than the control group. There was also no significant difference in quality of life as assessed by the SF36 questionnaires. The predominant reason these patients stated for referral to the ENT clinic was to restore nasal function (60%) (Fig 4).


Function or cosmesis--what is the predominant concern in patients with nasal trauma presenting for rhinoplasty?

Philpott CM, Clark A, McKiernan DC - Eplasty (2009)

Reason for referral to the ENT clinic.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2651746&req=5

Figure 4: Reason for referral to the ENT clinic.
Mentions: The age range of patients was 21 to 66 years in the control group and 17 to 67 years in the rhinoplasty group (means of 42 and 33, respectively). Patients referred to the outpatient clinic for consideration of rhinoplasty showed the expected positive correlation with unhappiness regarding their nasal function and cosmesis (P ≤ .001 and .0033, respectively; Table 1). They were also more likely to have injured their nose on a previous occasion (P = .0086). There was a greater proportion of males with nasal trauma in the rhinoplasty group than in the control group (P = .008). There was no evidence of a difference in social class between the 2 groups (P = .373) (Fig 2). However, the other variables considered did not demonstrate any significant differences between the 2 groups. Alcohol consumption did not have a positive correlation with nasal trauma, and binge drinking was only admitted by 4 patients although 3 of these were in the rhinoplasty group (Figs 3a and 3b). In fact there were more “teetotallers” in the rhinoplasty group than the control group. There was also no significant difference in quality of life as assessed by the SF36 questionnaires. The predominant reason these patients stated for referral to the ENT clinic was to restore nasal function (60%) (Fig 4).

Bottom Line: A cross-sectional questionnaire study was performed in the setting of otorhinolaryngology outpatient clinics in the Cambridge University Hospitals.New patients referred to the clinic with nasal deformities secondary to recent trauma were included.To provide a control group, new patients attending for nonrhinological reasons were also asked to complete 2 questionnaires (a study specific one and the SF36).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Departments of Otorhinolaryngology, Cambridge University Hospitals, (Addenbrooke's and West Suffolk Hospitals) NHS Trusts, Cambridge, United Kingdom. carl.philpott@btinternet.com

ABSTRACT

Objectives: To assess whether or not patients receiving rhinoplasties following nasal trauma sought intervention for a functional or cosmetic reason and look at underlying psychosocial influences.

Methods: A cross-sectional questionnaire study was performed in the setting of otorhinolaryngology outpatient clinics in the Cambridge University Hospitals. New patients referred to the clinic with nasal deformities secondary to recent trauma were included. To provide a control group, new patients attending for nonrhinological reasons were also asked to complete 2 questionnaires (a study specific one and the SF36). The age range of patients was 21 to 66 years in the control group and 17 to 67 years in the rhinoplasty group.

Results: Patients attending for rhinoplasty were more likely to be male (79% vs 37%, P = .008) and have had previous nasal trauma (relative risk = 2.14, P = .0086) They neither had significantly higher scores for the SF36 or higher alcohol consumption nor were more likely to participate in contact sports than the control group nor did they differ significantly in terms of social class.

Conclusion: This study did not find evidence that posttrauma rhinoplasty patients are anymore introspective and depressed than the normal control population and that function was the predominant concern over cosmesis.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus