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Fabrication of massive sheets of single layer patterned arrays using lipid directed reengineered phi29 motor dodecamer.

Xiao F, Sun J, Coban O, Schoen P, Wang JC, Cheng RH, Guo P - ACS Nano (2009)

Bottom Line: The ability to produce a single layer array of biological structures with high replication fidelity represents a significant advance in the area of nanomimetics.A thin lipid monolayer was used to direct the assembly of massive sheets of single layer patterned arrays of the reengineered motor dodecamer.Uniform, clean and highly ordered arrays were constructed as shown by both transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy imaging.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, Ohio 45221, USA.

ABSTRACT
The bottom-up assembly of patterned arrays is an exciting and important area in current nanotechnology. Arrays can be engineered to serve as components in chips for a virtually inexhaustible list of applications ranging from disease diagnosis to ultra-high-density data storage. Phi29 motor dodecamer has been reported to form elegant multilayer tetragonal arrays. However, multilayer protein arrays are of limited use for nanotechnological applications which demand nanoreplica or coating technologies. The ability to produce a single layer array of biological structures with high replication fidelity represents a significant advance in the area of nanomimetics. In this paper, we report on the assembly of single layer sheets of reengineered phi29 motor dodecamer. A thin lipid monolayer was used to direct the assembly of massive sheets of single layer patterned arrays of the reengineered motor dodecamer. Uniform, clean and highly ordered arrays were constructed as shown by both transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy imaging.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

High magnification AFM images of self-assembled arrays of reengineered motor dodecamers. (A) Tetragonal arrays of N-strep dodecamer. (B and C) Cross-sections along the axes of the two-dimensional array. The unit cell is a parallelogram with cell dimensions of 16 nm × 13 nm. (D) Tetragonal arrays of C-strep dodecamer. The unit cell is rectangular with a lattice constant of ∼18 nm.
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fig4: High magnification AFM images of self-assembled arrays of reengineered motor dodecamers. (A) Tetragonal arrays of N-strep dodecamer. (B and C) Cross-sections along the axes of the two-dimensional array. The unit cell is a parallelogram with cell dimensions of 16 nm × 13 nm. (D) Tetragonal arrays of C-strep dodecamer. The unit cell is rectangular with a lattice constant of ∼18 nm.

Mentions: Hydrophilic bare mica was used as alternative surface for the assembly and adsorption of single layers of the reengineered dodecamer with either N- and C-strep modified dodecamers. High-resolution images of the patterned surface are shown in 4. The N-strep dodecamers self-assembled into a parallelogram lattice (4). Cross-sections along the x (4) and y (4) directions of the crystalline areas indicated unit cell dimensions of ∼16 and ∼13 nm in the x and y directions, respectively. The angle between the x and y axis has been calculated to be ∼71°. Even though the tetragonal arrangement previously observed was maintained, the slightly different and unequal unit cell dimensions suggest that the packaging unit of this type of crystal might be slightly different from that of the lipid-directed N-strep 2D crystal. The crystal lattice in 4 is different from those in 1−3 concerning the angle of the pattern. While asking whether the difference observed in the lattices was the consequence directly related to the mutation of the protein is very intriguing, still little is known. A rectangular lattice with unit cell dimensions of 18 × 18 nm2 has been observed for the C-strep mutant. The dodecamer orientation in the self-assembled layer on the mica surface was similar to that in the three-dimensional crystal and generated face-up and face-down arrangements. While occasionally the low force applied for imaging was sufficient to image what appeared to be the narrow ends of the dodecamer, most of the time we could only visualize the wide dodecamer domains due to the nature of tip−sample interactions in AFM imaging.


Fabrication of massive sheets of single layer patterned arrays using lipid directed reengineered phi29 motor dodecamer.

Xiao F, Sun J, Coban O, Schoen P, Wang JC, Cheng RH, Guo P - ACS Nano (2009)

High magnification AFM images of self-assembled arrays of reengineered motor dodecamers. (A) Tetragonal arrays of N-strep dodecamer. (B and C) Cross-sections along the axes of the two-dimensional array. The unit cell is a parallelogram with cell dimensions of 16 nm × 13 nm. (D) Tetragonal arrays of C-strep dodecamer. The unit cell is rectangular with a lattice constant of ∼18 nm.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2651733&req=5

fig4: High magnification AFM images of self-assembled arrays of reengineered motor dodecamers. (A) Tetragonal arrays of N-strep dodecamer. (B and C) Cross-sections along the axes of the two-dimensional array. The unit cell is a parallelogram with cell dimensions of 16 nm × 13 nm. (D) Tetragonal arrays of C-strep dodecamer. The unit cell is rectangular with a lattice constant of ∼18 nm.
Mentions: Hydrophilic bare mica was used as alternative surface for the assembly and adsorption of single layers of the reengineered dodecamer with either N- and C-strep modified dodecamers. High-resolution images of the patterned surface are shown in 4. The N-strep dodecamers self-assembled into a parallelogram lattice (4). Cross-sections along the x (4) and y (4) directions of the crystalline areas indicated unit cell dimensions of ∼16 and ∼13 nm in the x and y directions, respectively. The angle between the x and y axis has been calculated to be ∼71°. Even though the tetragonal arrangement previously observed was maintained, the slightly different and unequal unit cell dimensions suggest that the packaging unit of this type of crystal might be slightly different from that of the lipid-directed N-strep 2D crystal. The crystal lattice in 4 is different from those in 1−3 concerning the angle of the pattern. While asking whether the difference observed in the lattices was the consequence directly related to the mutation of the protein is very intriguing, still little is known. A rectangular lattice with unit cell dimensions of 18 × 18 nm2 has been observed for the C-strep mutant. The dodecamer orientation in the self-assembled layer on the mica surface was similar to that in the three-dimensional crystal and generated face-up and face-down arrangements. While occasionally the low force applied for imaging was sufficient to image what appeared to be the narrow ends of the dodecamer, most of the time we could only visualize the wide dodecamer domains due to the nature of tip−sample interactions in AFM imaging.

Bottom Line: The ability to produce a single layer array of biological structures with high replication fidelity represents a significant advance in the area of nanomimetics.A thin lipid monolayer was used to direct the assembly of massive sheets of single layer patterned arrays of the reengineered motor dodecamer.Uniform, clean and highly ordered arrays were constructed as shown by both transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy imaging.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, Ohio 45221, USA.

ABSTRACT
The bottom-up assembly of patterned arrays is an exciting and important area in current nanotechnology. Arrays can be engineered to serve as components in chips for a virtually inexhaustible list of applications ranging from disease diagnosis to ultra-high-density data storage. Phi29 motor dodecamer has been reported to form elegant multilayer tetragonal arrays. However, multilayer protein arrays are of limited use for nanotechnological applications which demand nanoreplica or coating technologies. The ability to produce a single layer array of biological structures with high replication fidelity represents a significant advance in the area of nanomimetics. In this paper, we report on the assembly of single layer sheets of reengineered phi29 motor dodecamer. A thin lipid monolayer was used to direct the assembly of massive sheets of single layer patterned arrays of the reengineered motor dodecamer. Uniform, clean and highly ordered arrays were constructed as shown by both transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy imaging.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus