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Thiol-Yne Photopolymerizations: Novel Mechanism, Kinetics, and Step-Growth Formation of Highly Cross-Linked Networks.

Fairbanks BD, Scott TF, Kloxin CJ, Anseth KS, Bowman CN - Macromolecules (2008)

Bottom Line: Chain-growth polymerization of alkyne and vinyl functionalities was only observed for reactions in which the alkyne was originally in excess.A tetrafunctional thiol was photopolymerized with a difunctional alkyne, forming an inherently higher cross-link density than an analogous thiol-ene resin, displaying a higher glass transition temperature (48.9 vs -22.3 degrees C) and rubbery modulus (80 vs 13 MPa).Additionally, the versatile nature of this chemistry facilitates postpolymerization modification of residual reactive groups to produce materials with unique physical and chemical properties.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering and the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309-0424.

ABSTRACT
Radical-mediated thiol-yne step-growth photopolymerizations are utilized to form highly cross-linked polymer networks. This reaction mechanism is shown to be analogous to the thiol-ene photopolymerization; however, each alkyne functional group is capable of consecutive reaction with two thiol functional groups. The thiol-yne reaction involves the sequential propagation of a thiyl radical with either an alkyne or a vinyl functional group followed by chain transfer of the radical to another thiol. The rate of thiyl radical addition to the alkyne was determined to be approximately one-third of that to the vinyl. Chain-growth polymerization of alkyne and vinyl functionalities was only observed for reactions in which the alkyne was originally in excess. Analysis of initial polymerization rates demonstrated a near first-order dependence on thiol concentration, indicating that chain transfer is the rate-determining step. Further analysis revealed that the polymerization rate scaled with the initiation rate to an exponent of 0.65, deviating from classical square root dependence predicted for termination occurring exclusively by bimolecular reactions. A tetrafunctional thiol was photopolymerized with a difunctional alkyne, forming an inherently higher cross-link density than an analogous thiol-ene resin, displaying a higher glass transition temperature (48.9 vs -22.3 degrees C) and rubbery modulus (80 vs 13 MPa). Additionally, the versatile nature of this chemistry facilitates postpolymerization modification of residual reactive groups to produce materials with unique physical and chemical properties.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Sequential Addition and Hydrogen Abstraction Steps during a Thiol−Ene Polymerization
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sch1: Sequential Addition and Hydrogen Abstraction Steps during a Thiol−Ene Polymerization


Thiol-Yne Photopolymerizations: Novel Mechanism, Kinetics, and Step-Growth Formation of Highly Cross-Linked Networks.

Fairbanks BD, Scott TF, Kloxin CJ, Anseth KS, Bowman CN - Macromolecules (2008)

Sequential Addition and Hydrogen Abstraction Steps during a Thiol−Ene Polymerization
© Copyright Policy - open-access - ccc-price
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2651690&req=5

sch1: Sequential Addition and Hydrogen Abstraction Steps during a Thiol−Ene Polymerization
Bottom Line: Chain-growth polymerization of alkyne and vinyl functionalities was only observed for reactions in which the alkyne was originally in excess.A tetrafunctional thiol was photopolymerized with a difunctional alkyne, forming an inherently higher cross-link density than an analogous thiol-ene resin, displaying a higher glass transition temperature (48.9 vs -22.3 degrees C) and rubbery modulus (80 vs 13 MPa).Additionally, the versatile nature of this chemistry facilitates postpolymerization modification of residual reactive groups to produce materials with unique physical and chemical properties.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering and the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309-0424.

ABSTRACT
Radical-mediated thiol-yne step-growth photopolymerizations are utilized to form highly cross-linked polymer networks. This reaction mechanism is shown to be analogous to the thiol-ene photopolymerization; however, each alkyne functional group is capable of consecutive reaction with two thiol functional groups. The thiol-yne reaction involves the sequential propagation of a thiyl radical with either an alkyne or a vinyl functional group followed by chain transfer of the radical to another thiol. The rate of thiyl radical addition to the alkyne was determined to be approximately one-third of that to the vinyl. Chain-growth polymerization of alkyne and vinyl functionalities was only observed for reactions in which the alkyne was originally in excess. Analysis of initial polymerization rates demonstrated a near first-order dependence on thiol concentration, indicating that chain transfer is the rate-determining step. Further analysis revealed that the polymerization rate scaled with the initiation rate to an exponent of 0.65, deviating from classical square root dependence predicted for termination occurring exclusively by bimolecular reactions. A tetrafunctional thiol was photopolymerized with a difunctional alkyne, forming an inherently higher cross-link density than an analogous thiol-ene resin, displaying a higher glass transition temperature (48.9 vs -22.3 degrees C) and rubbery modulus (80 vs 13 MPa). Additionally, the versatile nature of this chemistry facilitates postpolymerization modification of residual reactive groups to produce materials with unique physical and chemical properties.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus