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Utilization of murine laparoscopy for continuous in-vivo assessment of the liver in multiple disease models.

Shapira Y, Katz M, Ali M, Kaplan M, Brazowski E, Halpern Z, Elinav E - PLoS ONE (2009)

Bottom Line: Current strategies for follow up of murine models of liver disease are flawed by inability to continuously monitor disease progression in the tissue level, and necessitate sacrifice of animals for tissue sampling.In this study we aimed at developing a safe repetitive tool for sampling livers in vivo, by utilization of a miniaturized endoscopy system for laparoscopic liver biopsies and for injection of tumor cells into livers.The system enables safe and repeated liver biopsies in mice and rats, yielding adequate tissue for histological staining and RNA extraction.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute for Gastroenterology and Liver Disease, Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Tel Aviv, Israel.

ABSTRACT

Background: Current strategies for follow up of murine models of liver disease are flawed by inability to continuously monitor disease progression in the tissue level, and necessitate sacrifice of animals for tissue sampling.

Aims: In this study we aimed at developing a safe repetitive tool for sampling livers in vivo, by utilization of a miniaturized endoscopy system for laparoscopic liver biopsies and for injection of tumor cells into livers.

Results: We report the development of a protocol for murine laparoscopy that allows repeated visualization of murine intra-abdominal organs. The system enables safe and repeated liver biopsies in mice and rats, yielding adequate tissue for histological staining and RNA extraction. In addition, injection of tumor cells into livers facilitates under-vision implantation of hepatic tumors in liver, followed by visualization of tumor growth.

Conclusions: Murine laparoscopy may be employed as a novel imaging modality for continuous assessment and manipulation of chronic liver disease models.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

rtPCR from hepatic mRNA collected by laparoscopic biopsy.In all four biopsied mice, albumin and GADPH mRNA expression could be clearly detected.
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pone-0004776-g006: rtPCR from hepatic mRNA collected by laparoscopic biopsy.In all four biopsied mice, albumin and GADPH mRNA expression could be clearly detected.

Mentions: Biopsy specimens were also used for extraction of total liver mRNA. In average, a single biopsy produced approximately 2 micrograms mRNA. This quantity of mRNA enabled the assessment of multiple liver-specific or liver-non-specific gene transcription products (such as albumin and GADPH, depicted in figure 6).


Utilization of murine laparoscopy for continuous in-vivo assessment of the liver in multiple disease models.

Shapira Y, Katz M, Ali M, Kaplan M, Brazowski E, Halpern Z, Elinav E - PLoS ONE (2009)

rtPCR from hepatic mRNA collected by laparoscopic biopsy.In all four biopsied mice, albumin and GADPH mRNA expression could be clearly detected.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2651645&req=5

pone-0004776-g006: rtPCR from hepatic mRNA collected by laparoscopic biopsy.In all four biopsied mice, albumin and GADPH mRNA expression could be clearly detected.
Mentions: Biopsy specimens were also used for extraction of total liver mRNA. In average, a single biopsy produced approximately 2 micrograms mRNA. This quantity of mRNA enabled the assessment of multiple liver-specific or liver-non-specific gene transcription products (such as albumin and GADPH, depicted in figure 6).

Bottom Line: Current strategies for follow up of murine models of liver disease are flawed by inability to continuously monitor disease progression in the tissue level, and necessitate sacrifice of animals for tissue sampling.In this study we aimed at developing a safe repetitive tool for sampling livers in vivo, by utilization of a miniaturized endoscopy system for laparoscopic liver biopsies and for injection of tumor cells into livers.The system enables safe and repeated liver biopsies in mice and rats, yielding adequate tissue for histological staining and RNA extraction.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute for Gastroenterology and Liver Disease, Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Tel Aviv, Israel.

ABSTRACT

Background: Current strategies for follow up of murine models of liver disease are flawed by inability to continuously monitor disease progression in the tissue level, and necessitate sacrifice of animals for tissue sampling.

Aims: In this study we aimed at developing a safe repetitive tool for sampling livers in vivo, by utilization of a miniaturized endoscopy system for laparoscopic liver biopsies and for injection of tumor cells into livers.

Results: We report the development of a protocol for murine laparoscopy that allows repeated visualization of murine intra-abdominal organs. The system enables safe and repeated liver biopsies in mice and rats, yielding adequate tissue for histological staining and RNA extraction. In addition, injection of tumor cells into livers facilitates under-vision implantation of hepatic tumors in liver, followed by visualization of tumor growth.

Conclusions: Murine laparoscopy may be employed as a novel imaging modality for continuous assessment and manipulation of chronic liver disease models.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus