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Congenital anomalies of the aortic arch: evaluation with the use of multidetector computed tomography.

Türkvatan A, Büyükbayraktar FG, Olçer T, Cumhur T - Korean J Radiol (2009)

Bottom Line: Congenital anomalies of the aortic arch have clinical importance, as the anomalies may be associated with vascular rings or other congenital cardiovascular diseases.Multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) angiography enables one to display the detailed anatomy of vascular structures and the spatial relationships with adjacent organs; this ability is the greatest advantage of the use of MDCT angiography in comparison to other imaging modalities in the evaluation of the congenital anomalies of the aortic arch.In this review article, we illustrate 16-slice MDCT angiography appearances of congenital anomalies of the aortic arch.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology, TürkIye Yüksek Ihtisas Hospital, Ankara, Turkey. aturkvatan@yahoo.com

ABSTRACT
Congenital anomalies of the aortic arch have clinical importance, as the anomalies may be associated with vascular rings or other congenital cardiovascular diseases. Multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) angiography enables one to display the detailed anatomy of vascular structures and the spatial relationships with adjacent organs; this ability is the greatest advantage of the use of MDCT angiography in comparison to other imaging modalities in the evaluation of the congenital anomalies of the aortic arch. In this review article, we illustrate 16-slice MDCT angiography appearances of congenital anomalies of the aortic arch.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Right aortic arch with aberrant left subclavian artery in 45-year-old asymptomatic woman is shown. Anterior (A) and posterior (B) volume rendering images show right aortic arch (RAA) with aberrant left subclavian artery (ALSA) associated with Kommerell's diverticulum (arrows) at its origin. First branch arising from aortic arch is left carotid artery (LCA), which is followed by right carotid artery (RCA), right subclavian artery (RSA) and ALSA.
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Figure 9: Right aortic arch with aberrant left subclavian artery in 45-year-old asymptomatic woman is shown. Anterior (A) and posterior (B) volume rendering images show right aortic arch (RAA) with aberrant left subclavian artery (ALSA) associated with Kommerell's diverticulum (arrows) at its origin. First branch arising from aortic arch is left carotid artery (LCA), which is followed by right carotid artery (RCA), right subclavian artery (RSA) and ALSA.

Mentions: An RAA with an ALSA is the most common type (5). This anomaly results from interruption of the dorsal segment of the left arch between the left common carotid and left subclavian arteries with regression of the right ductus arteriosus in the hypothetical double aortic arch (4) (Fig. 8). In this anomaly, the first branch arising from the aortic arch is the left carotid artery, which is followed by the right carotid artery, right subclavian arteries and ALSA in order (Fig. 9). The descending aorta is usually on the right side or near the midline. An ALSA may arise from a remnant of the left dorsal aortic root (Kommerell's diverticulum) (4) (Figs. 9, 10). This anomaly rarely produces symptoms and is usually an incidental radiological finding. Rarely, a right arch with an ALSA forms a complete vascular ring, left pulmonary artery and left ductus arteriosus. Symptoms of esophageal compression may develop in older individuals with ectasia, tortuosity or an aneurysm of the ALSA (1) (Figs. 10, 11). Respiratory symptoms due to tracheal compression may be present in pediatric patients (8). This anomaly is rarely associated with other cardiovascular abnormalities (5).


Congenital anomalies of the aortic arch: evaluation with the use of multidetector computed tomography.

Türkvatan A, Büyükbayraktar FG, Olçer T, Cumhur T - Korean J Radiol (2009)

Right aortic arch with aberrant left subclavian artery in 45-year-old asymptomatic woman is shown. Anterior (A) and posterior (B) volume rendering images show right aortic arch (RAA) with aberrant left subclavian artery (ALSA) associated with Kommerell's diverticulum (arrows) at its origin. First branch arising from aortic arch is left carotid artery (LCA), which is followed by right carotid artery (RCA), right subclavian artery (RSA) and ALSA.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2651449&req=5

Figure 9: Right aortic arch with aberrant left subclavian artery in 45-year-old asymptomatic woman is shown. Anterior (A) and posterior (B) volume rendering images show right aortic arch (RAA) with aberrant left subclavian artery (ALSA) associated with Kommerell's diverticulum (arrows) at its origin. First branch arising from aortic arch is left carotid artery (LCA), which is followed by right carotid artery (RCA), right subclavian artery (RSA) and ALSA.
Mentions: An RAA with an ALSA is the most common type (5). This anomaly results from interruption of the dorsal segment of the left arch between the left common carotid and left subclavian arteries with regression of the right ductus arteriosus in the hypothetical double aortic arch (4) (Fig. 8). In this anomaly, the first branch arising from the aortic arch is the left carotid artery, which is followed by the right carotid artery, right subclavian arteries and ALSA in order (Fig. 9). The descending aorta is usually on the right side or near the midline. An ALSA may arise from a remnant of the left dorsal aortic root (Kommerell's diverticulum) (4) (Figs. 9, 10). This anomaly rarely produces symptoms and is usually an incidental radiological finding. Rarely, a right arch with an ALSA forms a complete vascular ring, left pulmonary artery and left ductus arteriosus. Symptoms of esophageal compression may develop in older individuals with ectasia, tortuosity or an aneurysm of the ALSA (1) (Figs. 10, 11). Respiratory symptoms due to tracheal compression may be present in pediatric patients (8). This anomaly is rarely associated with other cardiovascular abnormalities (5).

Bottom Line: Congenital anomalies of the aortic arch have clinical importance, as the anomalies may be associated with vascular rings or other congenital cardiovascular diseases.Multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) angiography enables one to display the detailed anatomy of vascular structures and the spatial relationships with adjacent organs; this ability is the greatest advantage of the use of MDCT angiography in comparison to other imaging modalities in the evaluation of the congenital anomalies of the aortic arch.In this review article, we illustrate 16-slice MDCT angiography appearances of congenital anomalies of the aortic arch.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology, TürkIye Yüksek Ihtisas Hospital, Ankara, Turkey. aturkvatan@yahoo.com

ABSTRACT
Congenital anomalies of the aortic arch have clinical importance, as the anomalies may be associated with vascular rings or other congenital cardiovascular diseases. Multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) angiography enables one to display the detailed anatomy of vascular structures and the spatial relationships with adjacent organs; this ability is the greatest advantage of the use of MDCT angiography in comparison to other imaging modalities in the evaluation of the congenital anomalies of the aortic arch. In this review article, we illustrate 16-slice MDCT angiography appearances of congenital anomalies of the aortic arch.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus