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Giant cell tumor of talus: a case report.

Sharma S, Wani IH, Gupta N, Mahajan N, Salaria AQ - Cases J (2009)

Bottom Line: The authors report a case of GCT in a 19 year old boy which had led to extensive destruction of the talus.At 6 months of followup, the patient had a painless and well arthrodesed ankle.There was no evidence of recurrence at 18 months of followup.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Orthopedics, Government Medical College, Jammu, India. sids82@gmail.com.

ABSTRACT
Giant cell tumor of talus is a rare entity. In contrast to GCT of long bones, most cases occur in a younger age group and tend to be multicentric. The authors report a case of GCT in a 19 year old boy which had led to extensive destruction of the talus. In view of the extensive involvement, total talectomy along with tibio - calcaneal arthrodesis was performed. At 6 months of followup, the patient had a painless and well arthrodesed ankle. There was no evidence of recurrence at 18 months of followup.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Immediate postoperative radiograph showing talectomy, bone grafting and stabilization with a Steinmann pin.
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Figure 3: Immediate postoperative radiograph showing talectomy, bone grafting and stabilization with a Steinmann pin.

Mentions: Total talectomy was performed via the standard anterior approach. Fusion was achieved by autologous iliac crest graft and stabilization with a Steinmann pin (Figure 3). Histopathological examination of the talectomy material confirmed the diagnosis of Giant Cell Tumor. The patient was advised not to bear weight on the affected limb for 8 weeks and mobilized in a short leg walking cast thereafter. The Steinmann pin and cast were removed after 4 months. At 6 months of follow-up, the patient had a smooth healed scar with a painless and well arthrodesed ankle with no evidence of recurrence (Figure 4). There was no evidence of recurrence at 18 months of followup.


Giant cell tumor of talus: a case report.

Sharma S, Wani IH, Gupta N, Mahajan N, Salaria AQ - Cases J (2009)

Immediate postoperative radiograph showing talectomy, bone grafting and stabilization with a Steinmann pin.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2651116&req=5

Figure 3: Immediate postoperative radiograph showing talectomy, bone grafting and stabilization with a Steinmann pin.
Mentions: Total talectomy was performed via the standard anterior approach. Fusion was achieved by autologous iliac crest graft and stabilization with a Steinmann pin (Figure 3). Histopathological examination of the talectomy material confirmed the diagnosis of Giant Cell Tumor. The patient was advised not to bear weight on the affected limb for 8 weeks and mobilized in a short leg walking cast thereafter. The Steinmann pin and cast were removed after 4 months. At 6 months of follow-up, the patient had a smooth healed scar with a painless and well arthrodesed ankle with no evidence of recurrence (Figure 4). There was no evidence of recurrence at 18 months of followup.

Bottom Line: The authors report a case of GCT in a 19 year old boy which had led to extensive destruction of the talus.At 6 months of followup, the patient had a painless and well arthrodesed ankle.There was no evidence of recurrence at 18 months of followup.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Orthopedics, Government Medical College, Jammu, India. sids82@gmail.com.

ABSTRACT
Giant cell tumor of talus is a rare entity. In contrast to GCT of long bones, most cases occur in a younger age group and tend to be multicentric. The authors report a case of GCT in a 19 year old boy which had led to extensive destruction of the talus. In view of the extensive involvement, total talectomy along with tibio - calcaneal arthrodesis was performed. At 6 months of followup, the patient had a painless and well arthrodesed ankle. There was no evidence of recurrence at 18 months of followup.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus