Limits...
Pure sensory stroke from compression of putaminal haemorrhage: a case report.

Tong D - Cases J (2009)

Bottom Line: The literature rarely describes putaminal haemorrhage producing pure spinothalamic sensory deficit.Here reports a case of putaminal haemorrhage in which selective impairment of the spinothalamic sensory modality was due to the compression of the hematoma.The clinical course was characterized by rapid resolution of the deficits.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neurology, the Affiliated Pingxiang Hospital, Southern Medical University, PingXiang 337000, PR China. tongdaoming@163.com.

ABSTRACT

Introduction: The literature rarely describes putaminal haemorrhage producing pure spinothalamic sensory deficit. Here reports a case of putaminal haemorrhage in which selective impairment of the spinothalamic sensory modality was due to the compression of the hematoma.

Case presentation: A 57 year old hypertensive man presented with a pure sensory stroke(PSS), and CT scan showed a putaminal haemorrhage. The clinical course was characterized by rapid resolution of the deficits.

Conclusion: This case illustrates this rarely of PSS from compression of putaminal haemorrhage of good functional and vital prognosis, and stresses the value of CT scanning for diagnosis and prognosis.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

(A) CT scan at a level corresponding to the mid-thalamus, showing the hemorrhage located laterally to the posterior limb of the internal capsule. (B) CT scan with hemorrhage at the level of the left putamen, its posterior aspect is adjacent to the posterior part of the posterior limb of the internal capsule, and the posterior horn of the lateral ventricle compressed.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2651113&req=5

Figure 1: (A) CT scan at a level corresponding to the mid-thalamus, showing the hemorrhage located laterally to the posterior limb of the internal capsule. (B) CT scan with hemorrhage at the level of the left putamen, its posterior aspect is adjacent to the posterior part of the posterior limb of the internal capsule, and the posterior horn of the lateral ventricle compressed.

Mentions: A 57-year-old man with a history of hypertension and cerebral infarction was admitted due to suddenly of numbness on his right hand, arm, leg, and face. He had no headache, vomiting, and other symptoms. On admission, his blood pressure was 180/100 mmHg. He was alert with normal cranial nerves, motor functions, and speech. There was decreased touch and pinprich sense in the right half of his body that worsened in the lower extremity. Position and vibration sense were normal in the right fingers and toes, and stereognosis and graphesthesia were normal. The deep tendon reflexes were normal, and plantar reflexes were flexor. Coordination was intact bilaterally. Routine laboratory tests were normal. Brain computed tomographic scan showed a small hematoma in the left putaminal region occurring in the territory of the posterior branches of lateral lenticulostriate arteries, the area of decreased attenuation surrounding the hematoma represents edema and the posterior horn of the lateral ventricle compressed (Fig 1.A, B). No blood was detected in cuts at the level of the posterior limb of the internal capsule. The volume of this hematoma was estimated to be 6.3 cu mm. Mannital 20% was given in a dose of 0.5 g/kg IV infusion and repeated q8h. He was discharged with his symptom and sign completely resolved after 8 days.


Pure sensory stroke from compression of putaminal haemorrhage: a case report.

Tong D - Cases J (2009)

(A) CT scan at a level corresponding to the mid-thalamus, showing the hemorrhage located laterally to the posterior limb of the internal capsule. (B) CT scan with hemorrhage at the level of the left putamen, its posterior aspect is adjacent to the posterior part of the posterior limb of the internal capsule, and the posterior horn of the lateral ventricle compressed.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2651113&req=5

Figure 1: (A) CT scan at a level corresponding to the mid-thalamus, showing the hemorrhage located laterally to the posterior limb of the internal capsule. (B) CT scan with hemorrhage at the level of the left putamen, its posterior aspect is adjacent to the posterior part of the posterior limb of the internal capsule, and the posterior horn of the lateral ventricle compressed.
Mentions: A 57-year-old man with a history of hypertension and cerebral infarction was admitted due to suddenly of numbness on his right hand, arm, leg, and face. He had no headache, vomiting, and other symptoms. On admission, his blood pressure was 180/100 mmHg. He was alert with normal cranial nerves, motor functions, and speech. There was decreased touch and pinprich sense in the right half of his body that worsened in the lower extremity. Position and vibration sense were normal in the right fingers and toes, and stereognosis and graphesthesia were normal. The deep tendon reflexes were normal, and plantar reflexes were flexor. Coordination was intact bilaterally. Routine laboratory tests were normal. Brain computed tomographic scan showed a small hematoma in the left putaminal region occurring in the territory of the posterior branches of lateral lenticulostriate arteries, the area of decreased attenuation surrounding the hematoma represents edema and the posterior horn of the lateral ventricle compressed (Fig 1.A, B). No blood was detected in cuts at the level of the posterior limb of the internal capsule. The volume of this hematoma was estimated to be 6.3 cu mm. Mannital 20% was given in a dose of 0.5 g/kg IV infusion and repeated q8h. He was discharged with his symptom and sign completely resolved after 8 days.

Bottom Line: The literature rarely describes putaminal haemorrhage producing pure spinothalamic sensory deficit.Here reports a case of putaminal haemorrhage in which selective impairment of the spinothalamic sensory modality was due to the compression of the hematoma.The clinical course was characterized by rapid resolution of the deficits.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neurology, the Affiliated Pingxiang Hospital, Southern Medical University, PingXiang 337000, PR China. tongdaoming@163.com.

ABSTRACT

Introduction: The literature rarely describes putaminal haemorrhage producing pure spinothalamic sensory deficit. Here reports a case of putaminal haemorrhage in which selective impairment of the spinothalamic sensory modality was due to the compression of the hematoma.

Case presentation: A 57 year old hypertensive man presented with a pure sensory stroke(PSS), and CT scan showed a putaminal haemorrhage. The clinical course was characterized by rapid resolution of the deficits.

Conclusion: This case illustrates this rarely of PSS from compression of putaminal haemorrhage of good functional and vital prognosis, and stresses the value of CT scanning for diagnosis and prognosis.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus