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Cardiovascular risk behavior among sedentary female smokers and smoking cessation outcomes.

Korhonen T, Kinnunen T, Quiles Z, Leeman RF, Terwal DM, Garvey AJ - Tob Induc Dis (2005)

Bottom Line: Diet was related to depressive symptoms at baseline.Alcohol use was related to nicotine dependence and education level.Although diet alone was not associated with cessation outcome the high-fat diet interacted with depressive symptoms, such that the depressed women with high-fat diet were significantly more likely to relapse in their quit attempt compared to other subgroups.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Tobacco Dependence Treatment and Research, Harvard School of Dental Medicine, Boston, MA, USA.

ABSTRACT

Background: We examined female sedentary smokers' additional cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk behaviors and their associations to smoking cessation.

Methods: This study was part of a randomized controlled trial testing the effectiveness of exercise and nicotine gum in smoking cessation. Included in the analyses were 148 participants. Dietary habits and alcohol consumption were measured as additional CVD risk behaviors. High-fat diet and heavy alcohol use were considered those risk behaviors. Nicotine dependence, length of the longest quit attempt, depressive symptoms, self-efficacy, and education were examined as other baseline variables. Abstinence from tobacco was recorded through 12 months.

Results: Diet was related to depressive symptoms at baseline. Alcohol use was related to nicotine dependence and education level. Heavy alcohol use alone and accumulation of two added risk behaviors predicted poorer smoking cessation outcome. Although diet alone was not associated with cessation outcome the high-fat diet interacted with depressive symptoms, such that the depressed women with high-fat diet were significantly more likely to relapse in their quit attempt compared to other subgroups.

Conclusion: Non-moderate alcohol use alone and accumulation of multiple CVD risk behaviors seem to be associated with lower success in smoking cessation.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Percent abstinent during 365 days post-cessation by diet group in depressed participants. Abstinence of those with high depression scores and high-fat diet was significantly poorer than among those depressed with high-vegetable diet (p = 0.02 Log Rank test; p = 0.01 Cox F test).
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Figure 5: Percent abstinent during 365 days post-cessation by diet group in depressed participants. Abstinence of those with high depression scores and high-fat diet was significantly poorer than among those depressed with high-vegetable diet (p = 0.02 Log Rank test; p = 0.01 Cox F test).

Mentions: None of the other baseline variables studied had any significant main effect on abstinence. When adjusting for the other variables (Table 5), the associations of alcohol alone (1.62; 1.06–2.48) and alcohol accumulated with high-fat (2.56; 1.16–5.62) remained significant. Finally, we tested the interactions of heavy alcohol use and high-fat diet with all other baseline variables. Only one significant interaction was found, i.e. between baseline depressive symptoms and dietary behavior (p= 0.019). When adjusting for other baseline variables the quitters with high CESD scores were three times as likely to relapse (Hazard ratio = 3.02, CI95% 1.20–7.57) in comparison to those with high vegetable diet and low depression score (Table 6). The pair-wise comparisons between each subgroup based on reference cell coding are shown in Table 7. The survival curves of subgroups by depressive symptoms and diet group are shown in Figure 5a and 5b. Based on both pair-wise comparison tests, the survival of those with high depression scores and high-fat diet was significantly poorer than among those depressed with high-vegetable diet (p = 0.02 Log Rank test; p = 0.01 Cox F test). Among the participants with low depression scores there was no significant difference by dietary behavior in abstinence.


Cardiovascular risk behavior among sedentary female smokers and smoking cessation outcomes.

Korhonen T, Kinnunen T, Quiles Z, Leeman RF, Terwal DM, Garvey AJ - Tob Induc Dis (2005)

Percent abstinent during 365 days post-cessation by diet group in depressed participants. Abstinence of those with high depression scores and high-fat diet was significantly poorer than among those depressed with high-vegetable diet (p = 0.02 Log Rank test; p = 0.01 Cox F test).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2643417&req=5

Figure 5: Percent abstinent during 365 days post-cessation by diet group in depressed participants. Abstinence of those with high depression scores and high-fat diet was significantly poorer than among those depressed with high-vegetable diet (p = 0.02 Log Rank test; p = 0.01 Cox F test).
Mentions: None of the other baseline variables studied had any significant main effect on abstinence. When adjusting for the other variables (Table 5), the associations of alcohol alone (1.62; 1.06–2.48) and alcohol accumulated with high-fat (2.56; 1.16–5.62) remained significant. Finally, we tested the interactions of heavy alcohol use and high-fat diet with all other baseline variables. Only one significant interaction was found, i.e. between baseline depressive symptoms and dietary behavior (p= 0.019). When adjusting for other baseline variables the quitters with high CESD scores were three times as likely to relapse (Hazard ratio = 3.02, CI95% 1.20–7.57) in comparison to those with high vegetable diet and low depression score (Table 6). The pair-wise comparisons between each subgroup based on reference cell coding are shown in Table 7. The survival curves of subgroups by depressive symptoms and diet group are shown in Figure 5a and 5b. Based on both pair-wise comparison tests, the survival of those with high depression scores and high-fat diet was significantly poorer than among those depressed with high-vegetable diet (p = 0.02 Log Rank test; p = 0.01 Cox F test). Among the participants with low depression scores there was no significant difference by dietary behavior in abstinence.

Bottom Line: Diet was related to depressive symptoms at baseline.Alcohol use was related to nicotine dependence and education level.Although diet alone was not associated with cessation outcome the high-fat diet interacted with depressive symptoms, such that the depressed women with high-fat diet were significantly more likely to relapse in their quit attempt compared to other subgroups.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Tobacco Dependence Treatment and Research, Harvard School of Dental Medicine, Boston, MA, USA.

ABSTRACT

Background: We examined female sedentary smokers' additional cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk behaviors and their associations to smoking cessation.

Methods: This study was part of a randomized controlled trial testing the effectiveness of exercise and nicotine gum in smoking cessation. Included in the analyses were 148 participants. Dietary habits and alcohol consumption were measured as additional CVD risk behaviors. High-fat diet and heavy alcohol use were considered those risk behaviors. Nicotine dependence, length of the longest quit attempt, depressive symptoms, self-efficacy, and education were examined as other baseline variables. Abstinence from tobacco was recorded through 12 months.

Results: Diet was related to depressive symptoms at baseline. Alcohol use was related to nicotine dependence and education level. Heavy alcohol use alone and accumulation of two added risk behaviors predicted poorer smoking cessation outcome. Although diet alone was not associated with cessation outcome the high-fat diet interacted with depressive symptoms, such that the depressed women with high-fat diet were significantly more likely to relapse in their quit attempt compared to other subgroups.

Conclusion: Non-moderate alcohol use alone and accumulation of multiple CVD risk behaviors seem to be associated with lower success in smoking cessation.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus