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Is quality affordable?

Lindfield R, Foster A - Community Eye Health (2008)

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Affiliation: International Centre for Eye Health, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, Keppel Street, London WC1E 7HT, UK.

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Can a person who lives on less than US $1 per day afford a high-quality cataract operation? The American Medical Association defines the quality of care services as “the degree to which [these] services influence the probability of optimal patient outcomes. ” The World Health Organization offers a more comprehensive defnition and divides quality in four sections: (technical quality), including: evidence-based practice clinical audit development of guidelines measures of outcome (efficiency) (risk of injury or illness associated with the service provided) The different aspects of quality have been formulated into a set of six characteristics that any high-quality health programme should display... As shown in the Box overleaf, such a programme should be: safe, effective, patient-centred, timely, efficient, and equitable... Affordability of quality is not only or always a question of cost... Cost-effectiveness is important, but so is the best use of resources... We need to decide whether these improvments will be resource-efficient in the long run, as shown by the examples below... If a costly change significantly improves quality, it may be seen as affordable in view of the long-term benefits... An ophthalmologist was keen to move from extracapsular cataract extraction (ECCE) to small incision cataract surgery (SICS)... Investigation of the evidence showed a marked difference in surgical outcomes between ECCE and SICS... The cost of moving from ECCE to SICS, whilst large, was felt by the hospital administration to be affordable, because it had the potential to significantly improve clinical outcomes... A government hospital in a low-income country wants to set up a corneal eye bank... The ministry of health can only identify a few patients who would benefit from this service and believes that any additional money should rather be spent on cataract surgery, as the need for it is greater... For example, if the hospital cannot obtain intraocular lenses (IOLs), then how can it provide a high-quality cataract surgical service? In order to achieve this, both clinical and non-clinical services need to be of the best possible quality... This requires the involvement of all eye care staff to regularly discuss the quality of care and to identify ways in which practice can be improved with available resources.

No MeSH data available.


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Is quality affordable?

Lindfield R, Foster A - Community Eye Health (2008)

© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

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getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2643032&req=5

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: International Centre for Eye Health, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, Keppel Street, London WC1E 7HT, UK.

AUTOMATICALLY GENERATED EXCERPT
Please rate it.

Can a person who lives on less than US $1 per day afford a high-quality cataract operation? The American Medical Association defines the quality of care services as “the degree to which [these] services influence the probability of optimal patient outcomes. ” The World Health Organization offers a more comprehensive defnition and divides quality in four sections: (technical quality), including: evidence-based practice clinical audit development of guidelines measures of outcome (efficiency) (risk of injury or illness associated with the service provided) The different aspects of quality have been formulated into a set of six characteristics that any high-quality health programme should display... As shown in the Box overleaf, such a programme should be: safe, effective, patient-centred, timely, efficient, and equitable... Affordability of quality is not only or always a question of cost... Cost-effectiveness is important, but so is the best use of resources... We need to decide whether these improvments will be resource-efficient in the long run, as shown by the examples below... If a costly change significantly improves quality, it may be seen as affordable in view of the long-term benefits... An ophthalmologist was keen to move from extracapsular cataract extraction (ECCE) to small incision cataract surgery (SICS)... Investigation of the evidence showed a marked difference in surgical outcomes between ECCE and SICS... The cost of moving from ECCE to SICS, whilst large, was felt by the hospital administration to be affordable, because it had the potential to significantly improve clinical outcomes... A government hospital in a low-income country wants to set up a corneal eye bank... The ministry of health can only identify a few patients who would benefit from this service and believes that any additional money should rather be spent on cataract surgery, as the need for it is greater... For example, if the hospital cannot obtain intraocular lenses (IOLs), then how can it provide a high-quality cataract surgical service? In order to achieve this, both clinical and non-clinical services need to be of the best possible quality... This requires the involvement of all eye care staff to regularly discuss the quality of care and to identify ways in which practice can be improved with available resources.

No MeSH data available.