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Generating Stimuli for Neuroscience Using PsychoPy.

Peirce JW - Front Neuroinform (2009)

Bottom Line: As a result, new experiments can be written very quickly, and trying to understand a previously written script is easy, even with minimal code comments.PsychoPy can also generate movies and image sequences to be used in demos or simulated neuroscience experiments.This paper describes the range of tools and stimuli that it provides and the environment in which experiments are conducted.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Nottingham Visual Neuroscience, School of Psychology, University of Nottingham Nottingham, UK.

ABSTRACT
PsychoPy is a software library written in Python, using OpenGL to generate very precise visual stimuli on standard personal computers. It is designed to allow the construction of as wide a variety of neuroscience experiments as possible, with the least effort. By writing scripts in standard Python syntax users can generate an enormous variety of visual and auditory stimuli and can interact with a wide range of external hardware (enabling its use in fMRI, EEG, MEG etc.). The structure of scripts is simple and intuitive. As a result, new experiments can be written very quickly, and trying to understand a previously written script is easy, even with minimal code comments. PsychoPy can also generate movies and image sequences to be used in demos or simulated neuroscience experiments. This paper describes the range of tools and stimuli that it provides and the environment in which experiments are conducted.

No MeSH data available.


Presenting stimuli under real-time control. This demo script controls a drifting grating in real-time according to input from the mouse. It demonstrates the use of the Window, PatchStim, TextStim and Mouse objects and how to get keyboard input from the participant. These objects have associated methods that allow them to have their attributes changed.
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CS1: Presenting stimuli under real-time control. This demo script controls a drifting grating in real-time according to input from the mouse. It demonstrates the use of the Window, PatchStim, TextStim and Mouse objects and how to get keyboard input from the participant. These objects have associated methods that allow them to have their attributes changed.

Mentions: Most experiments also need to receive and store information about responses from subjects. For PsychoPy, this can be achieved via a number of simple means; keyboards, mice, joysticks and specialised hardware such as button boxes. The simplest possible input method is to examine recent events from the keyboard using the event.getKeys() and event.waitKeys() functions. These allow the user to see what keys have been pressed since the last call or to wait until one has been pressed (and may be restricted to a small number of allowed keys). The event.Mouse object allows PsychoPy users to determine where the mouse is at any given moment or whether a mouse button has been pressed with simple methods such as getPos(), getWheelRel() (to retrieve the relative movement of the mouse scroll wheel) and getPressed(). Code Snippet 1 demonstrates how to use these mouse and keyboard facilities to control a drifting Gabor patch (a sinusoidal grating in a Gaussian-shaped envelope) in real-time within a PsychoPy window.


Generating Stimuli for Neuroscience Using PsychoPy.

Peirce JW - Front Neuroinform (2009)

Presenting stimuli under real-time control. This demo script controls a drifting grating in real-time according to input from the mouse. It demonstrates the use of the Window, PatchStim, TextStim and Mouse objects and how to get keyboard input from the participant. These objects have associated methods that allow them to have their attributes changed.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2636899&req=5

CS1: Presenting stimuli under real-time control. This demo script controls a drifting grating in real-time according to input from the mouse. It demonstrates the use of the Window, PatchStim, TextStim and Mouse objects and how to get keyboard input from the participant. These objects have associated methods that allow them to have their attributes changed.
Mentions: Most experiments also need to receive and store information about responses from subjects. For PsychoPy, this can be achieved via a number of simple means; keyboards, mice, joysticks and specialised hardware such as button boxes. The simplest possible input method is to examine recent events from the keyboard using the event.getKeys() and event.waitKeys() functions. These allow the user to see what keys have been pressed since the last call or to wait until one has been pressed (and may be restricted to a small number of allowed keys). The event.Mouse object allows PsychoPy users to determine where the mouse is at any given moment or whether a mouse button has been pressed with simple methods such as getPos(), getWheelRel() (to retrieve the relative movement of the mouse scroll wheel) and getPressed(). Code Snippet 1 demonstrates how to use these mouse and keyboard facilities to control a drifting Gabor patch (a sinusoidal grating in a Gaussian-shaped envelope) in real-time within a PsychoPy window.

Bottom Line: As a result, new experiments can be written very quickly, and trying to understand a previously written script is easy, even with minimal code comments.PsychoPy can also generate movies and image sequences to be used in demos or simulated neuroscience experiments.This paper describes the range of tools and stimuli that it provides and the environment in which experiments are conducted.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Nottingham Visual Neuroscience, School of Psychology, University of Nottingham Nottingham, UK.

ABSTRACT
PsychoPy is a software library written in Python, using OpenGL to generate very precise visual stimuli on standard personal computers. It is designed to allow the construction of as wide a variety of neuroscience experiments as possible, with the least effort. By writing scripts in standard Python syntax users can generate an enormous variety of visual and auditory stimuli and can interact with a wide range of external hardware (enabling its use in fMRI, EEG, MEG etc.). The structure of scripts is simple and intuitive. As a result, new experiments can be written very quickly, and trying to understand a previously written script is easy, even with minimal code comments. PsychoPy can also generate movies and image sequences to be used in demos or simulated neuroscience experiments. This paper describes the range of tools and stimuli that it provides and the environment in which experiments are conducted.

No MeSH data available.