Limits...
Trends in hospitalizations for diagnosed congenital cytomegalovirus in infants and children in Australia.

Seale H, Booy R, MacIntyre CR - BMC Pediatr (2009)

Bottom Line: Of these admissions, 25% were principally hospitalized because of congenital CMV.Compared with many other congenital illnesses, which are now vaccine preventable, the burden of congenital CMV is comparatively high.A vaccination program would be justifiable should a vaccine become available.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Public Health and Community Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of New South Wales, Kensington, New South Wales, Australia. h.seale@unsw.edu.au

ABSTRACT

Background: Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is responsible for a wide range of diseases in neonates, and has been recognized as a major cause of congenital defects in developed countries for many years. More children suffer serious disabilities caused by congenital CMV than by several better-known childhood maladies. Insight into the epidemiology of congenital CMV disease is needed for the assessment of preventive strategies.

Methods: Using data from the National Hospital Morbidity Database (NHMD) complied by the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW), we examined the rates of hospital admissions for children diagnosed with congenital cytomegalovirus (CMV) by year, sex, age group and length of stay.

Results: Over an 8-year period (1993-2001), there were 1314 admissions for the congenital form of CMV disease. Of these admissions, 25% were principally hospitalized because of congenital CMV. The average annual rate of admissions in children aged 0-4, 5-9 and 10-14 years was 9.40, 2.40 and 0.85 per 100,000 Australian population respectively.

Conclusion: Compared with many other congenital illnesses, which are now vaccine preventable, the burden of congenital CMV is comparatively high. A vaccination program would be justifiable should a vaccine become available.

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

Number of hospital admissions for congenital CMV by age group (aged ≤ 23 months) and year of diagnosis, Australia, July 1993 to June 2001.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2636807&req=5

Figure 2: Number of hospital admissions for congenital CMV by age group (aged ≤ 23 months) and year of diagnosis, Australia, July 1993 to June 2001.

Mentions: Out of the 1314 hospital admissions, 57.9% were recorded for a patient aged ≤ 23 months. The average annual admission rate for infants aged ≤ 23 was 62.3 per 100,000 Table 2). Over the eight year period, admissions peaked for children aged <1 month in 1996–1997, after which time admissions declined again. For the other age groups, there were minor peaks registered for each group, but they were not as dramatic as they were for the youngest age category (Figure 2). In patients aged less than one month, the average annual admission rate was 443 per 100,000 compared to only 9.3 per 100,000 for children aged between 10 and 23 months. Females accounted for 50% of all admissions for this age bracket. Children aged four months and over had a significantly lower risk of being hospitalized with CMV compared with children aged less than one month, and this risk decreased with increasing age. All fatal cases of CMV were in children aged less than 12 months (23 cases over 8 years).


Trends in hospitalizations for diagnosed congenital cytomegalovirus in infants and children in Australia.

Seale H, Booy R, MacIntyre CR - BMC Pediatr (2009)

Number of hospital admissions for congenital CMV by age group (aged ≤ 23 months) and year of diagnosis, Australia, July 1993 to June 2001.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2636807&req=5

Figure 2: Number of hospital admissions for congenital CMV by age group (aged ≤ 23 months) and year of diagnosis, Australia, July 1993 to June 2001.
Mentions: Out of the 1314 hospital admissions, 57.9% were recorded for a patient aged ≤ 23 months. The average annual admission rate for infants aged ≤ 23 was 62.3 per 100,000 Table 2). Over the eight year period, admissions peaked for children aged <1 month in 1996–1997, after which time admissions declined again. For the other age groups, there were minor peaks registered for each group, but they were not as dramatic as they were for the youngest age category (Figure 2). In patients aged less than one month, the average annual admission rate was 443 per 100,000 compared to only 9.3 per 100,000 for children aged between 10 and 23 months. Females accounted for 50% of all admissions for this age bracket. Children aged four months and over had a significantly lower risk of being hospitalized with CMV compared with children aged less than one month, and this risk decreased with increasing age. All fatal cases of CMV were in children aged less than 12 months (23 cases over 8 years).

Bottom Line: Of these admissions, 25% were principally hospitalized because of congenital CMV.Compared with many other congenital illnesses, which are now vaccine preventable, the burden of congenital CMV is comparatively high.A vaccination program would be justifiable should a vaccine become available.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Public Health and Community Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of New South Wales, Kensington, New South Wales, Australia. h.seale@unsw.edu.au

ABSTRACT

Background: Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is responsible for a wide range of diseases in neonates, and has been recognized as a major cause of congenital defects in developed countries for many years. More children suffer serious disabilities caused by congenital CMV than by several better-known childhood maladies. Insight into the epidemiology of congenital CMV disease is needed for the assessment of preventive strategies.

Methods: Using data from the National Hospital Morbidity Database (NHMD) complied by the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW), we examined the rates of hospital admissions for children diagnosed with congenital cytomegalovirus (CMV) by year, sex, age group and length of stay.

Results: Over an 8-year period (1993-2001), there were 1314 admissions for the congenital form of CMV disease. Of these admissions, 25% were principally hospitalized because of congenital CMV. The average annual rate of admissions in children aged 0-4, 5-9 and 10-14 years was 9.40, 2.40 and 0.85 per 100,000 Australian population respectively.

Conclusion: Compared with many other congenital illnesses, which are now vaccine preventable, the burden of congenital CMV is comparatively high. A vaccination program would be justifiable should a vaccine become available.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus