Limits...
"There's nothing I can't do--I just put my mind to anything and I can do it": a qualitative analysis of how children with chronic disease and their parents account for and manage physical activity.

Fereday J, MacDougall C, Spizzo M, Darbyshire P, Schiller W - BMC Pediatr (2009)

Bottom Line: Their parents' stories described the diligent background planning and management undertaken to enable their child to participate in a wide range of physical activities.They were physically active and perceived themselves to be no different from their peers.Their positive beliefs were shared by their parents and the level of participation described was enabled by the high level of parental support and background planning involved in managing their child's health care needs.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Children, Youth and Women's Health Service, 72 King William St, North Adelaide, South Australia, Australia. jennifer.fereday@cywhs.sa.gov.au

ABSTRACT

Background: This paper reports the findings of a South Australian qualitative, exploratory study of children and young people living with a chronic disease, and their perceptions and experiences of physical activity. The perceptions and experiences of their parents were also explored. The chronic diseases were type 1 diabetes, asthma and cystic fibrosis.

Methods: Multiple qualitative data collection techniques were used to elicit the children and young people's perspectives and experiences of physical activity, including focus groups, maps, photos and 'traffic light posters'. The children's parents were interviewed separately to ascertain their views of their child's participation in physical activities.

Results: Children and young people described their active participation in a wide variety of physical activities including organised sports and play, but made very little mention of any negative influence or impact due to their disease. Their parents' stories described the diligent background planning and management undertaken to enable their child to participate in a wide range of physical activities.

Conclusion: The results of this study suggest that for these children and young people, having a chronic disease was not perceived as a barrier to participation in organised sport and recreational activities. They were physically active and perceived themselves to be no different from their peers. Their positive beliefs were shared by their parents and the level of participation described was enabled by the high level of parental support and background planning involved in managing their child's health care needs.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Alexander's poster.
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Related In: Results  -  Collection

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Figure 3: Alexander's poster.

Mentions: Participation in Stage 1 of the study involved a combination of focus group interviews, drawing maps, taking photos and designing 'traffic light' posters (see Figures 2 and 3) by the children and young people. Using multiple data collection methods within a framework of children's active participation is consistent with global calls for participation and involvement of children and young people in health research and practice [27]. This also helped engage and interest children, leading to the collection of more diverse and valuable data.


"There's nothing I can't do--I just put my mind to anything and I can do it": a qualitative analysis of how children with chronic disease and their parents account for and manage physical activity.

Fereday J, MacDougall C, Spizzo M, Darbyshire P, Schiller W - BMC Pediatr (2009)

Alexander's poster.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2636806&req=5

Figure 3: Alexander's poster.
Mentions: Participation in Stage 1 of the study involved a combination of focus group interviews, drawing maps, taking photos and designing 'traffic light' posters (see Figures 2 and 3) by the children and young people. Using multiple data collection methods within a framework of children's active participation is consistent with global calls for participation and involvement of children and young people in health research and practice [27]. This also helped engage and interest children, leading to the collection of more diverse and valuable data.

Bottom Line: Their parents' stories described the diligent background planning and management undertaken to enable their child to participate in a wide range of physical activities.They were physically active and perceived themselves to be no different from their peers.Their positive beliefs were shared by their parents and the level of participation described was enabled by the high level of parental support and background planning involved in managing their child's health care needs.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Children, Youth and Women's Health Service, 72 King William St, North Adelaide, South Australia, Australia. jennifer.fereday@cywhs.sa.gov.au

ABSTRACT

Background: This paper reports the findings of a South Australian qualitative, exploratory study of children and young people living with a chronic disease, and their perceptions and experiences of physical activity. The perceptions and experiences of their parents were also explored. The chronic diseases were type 1 diabetes, asthma and cystic fibrosis.

Methods: Multiple qualitative data collection techniques were used to elicit the children and young people's perspectives and experiences of physical activity, including focus groups, maps, photos and 'traffic light posters'. The children's parents were interviewed separately to ascertain their views of their child's participation in physical activities.

Results: Children and young people described their active participation in a wide variety of physical activities including organised sports and play, but made very little mention of any negative influence or impact due to their disease. Their parents' stories described the diligent background planning and management undertaken to enable their child to participate in a wide range of physical activities.

Conclusion: The results of this study suggest that for these children and young people, having a chronic disease was not perceived as a barrier to participation in organised sport and recreational activities. They were physically active and perceived themselves to be no different from their peers. Their positive beliefs were shared by their parents and the level of participation described was enabled by the high level of parental support and background planning involved in managing their child's health care needs.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus