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Detection of hydrogen peroxide with chemiluminescent micelles.

Lee D, Erigala VR, Dasari M, Yu J, Dickson RM, Murthy N - Int J Nanomedicine (2008)

Bottom Line: In this communication, we present a new contrast agent for hydrogen peroxide, termed peroxalate micelles, which detect hydrogen peroxide through chemiluminescence, and have the physical/chemical properties needed for in vivo imaging applications.The peroxalate micelles can detect nanomolar concentrations of hydrogen peroxide (>50 nM) and thus have the sensitivity needed to detect physiological concentrations of hydrogen peroxide.We anticipate numerous applications of the peroxalate micelles for in vivo imaging of hydrogen peroxide, given their high sensitivity, small size, and biocompatible PEG corona.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: The Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332, USA.

ABSTRACT
The overproduction of hydrogen peroxide is implicated in the progress of numerous life-threatening diseases and there is a great need for the development of contrast agents that can detect hydrogen peroxide in vivo. In this communication, we present a new contrast agent for hydrogen peroxide, termed peroxalate micelles, which detect hydrogen peroxide through chemiluminescence, and have the physical/chemical properties needed for in vivo imaging applications. The peroxalate micelles are composed of amphiphilic peroxalate based copolymers and the fluorescent dye rubrene, they have a 'stealth' polyethylene glycol (PEG) corona to evade macrophage phagocytosis, and a diameter of 33 nm to enhance extravasation into permeable tissues. The peroxalate micelles can detect nanomolar concentrations of hydrogen peroxide (>50 nM) and thus have the sensitivity needed to detect physiological concentrations of hydrogen peroxide. We anticipate numerous applications of the peroxalate micelles for in vivo imaging of hydrogen peroxide, given their high sensitivity, small size, and biocompatible PEG corona.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Dynamic light scattering (a) and chemiluminescence emission spectra of the peroxalate micelles (b). The emission wavelength was recorded in the absence or presence of hydrogen peroxide (10 μM).
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f2-ijn-3-471: Dynamic light scattering (a) and chemiluminescence emission spectra of the peroxalate micelles (b). The emission wavelength was recorded in the absence or presence of hydrogen peroxide (10 μM).

Mentions: The peroxalate micelles were formulated from the copolymer 3 via a solvent displacement method. The solvent displacement method was chosen for micelle formation because it has been extensively used to generate micelles in the range of 20~50 nm in diameter. Micelles of this size are particularly useful in biological applications because of their long circulation time in the blood and great potential for extravasation into tissues (Gao et al 2002; Nasongkla et al 2006). The copolymer 3 (20 mg) and fluorescent dye rubrene (1 mg) were dissolved in acetone, followed by mixing with a large volume of water, generating micelles that had a mean size of 33 nm in diameter, as determined by dynamic light scattering (Figure 2a). The chemiluminescent emission spectrum of the micelles was obtained in the presence of hydrogen peroxide (10 μM). Figure 2b demonstrates that hydrogen peroxide initiates peroxalate chemiluminescence within the micelles, leading to photon emission at 560 nm, which is similar to the fluorescence emission wavelength of rubrene.


Detection of hydrogen peroxide with chemiluminescent micelles.

Lee D, Erigala VR, Dasari M, Yu J, Dickson RM, Murthy N - Int J Nanomedicine (2008)

Dynamic light scattering (a) and chemiluminescence emission spectra of the peroxalate micelles (b). The emission wavelength was recorded in the absence or presence of hydrogen peroxide (10 μM).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2636589&req=5

f2-ijn-3-471: Dynamic light scattering (a) and chemiluminescence emission spectra of the peroxalate micelles (b). The emission wavelength was recorded in the absence or presence of hydrogen peroxide (10 μM).
Mentions: The peroxalate micelles were formulated from the copolymer 3 via a solvent displacement method. The solvent displacement method was chosen for micelle formation because it has been extensively used to generate micelles in the range of 20~50 nm in diameter. Micelles of this size are particularly useful in biological applications because of their long circulation time in the blood and great potential for extravasation into tissues (Gao et al 2002; Nasongkla et al 2006). The copolymer 3 (20 mg) and fluorescent dye rubrene (1 mg) were dissolved in acetone, followed by mixing with a large volume of water, generating micelles that had a mean size of 33 nm in diameter, as determined by dynamic light scattering (Figure 2a). The chemiluminescent emission spectrum of the micelles was obtained in the presence of hydrogen peroxide (10 μM). Figure 2b demonstrates that hydrogen peroxide initiates peroxalate chemiluminescence within the micelles, leading to photon emission at 560 nm, which is similar to the fluorescence emission wavelength of rubrene.

Bottom Line: In this communication, we present a new contrast agent for hydrogen peroxide, termed peroxalate micelles, which detect hydrogen peroxide through chemiluminescence, and have the physical/chemical properties needed for in vivo imaging applications.The peroxalate micelles can detect nanomolar concentrations of hydrogen peroxide (>50 nM) and thus have the sensitivity needed to detect physiological concentrations of hydrogen peroxide.We anticipate numerous applications of the peroxalate micelles for in vivo imaging of hydrogen peroxide, given their high sensitivity, small size, and biocompatible PEG corona.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: The Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332, USA.

ABSTRACT
The overproduction of hydrogen peroxide is implicated in the progress of numerous life-threatening diseases and there is a great need for the development of contrast agents that can detect hydrogen peroxide in vivo. In this communication, we present a new contrast agent for hydrogen peroxide, termed peroxalate micelles, which detect hydrogen peroxide through chemiluminescence, and have the physical/chemical properties needed for in vivo imaging applications. The peroxalate micelles are composed of amphiphilic peroxalate based copolymers and the fluorescent dye rubrene, they have a 'stealth' polyethylene glycol (PEG) corona to evade macrophage phagocytosis, and a diameter of 33 nm to enhance extravasation into permeable tissues. The peroxalate micelles can detect nanomolar concentrations of hydrogen peroxide (>50 nM) and thus have the sensitivity needed to detect physiological concentrations of hydrogen peroxide. We anticipate numerous applications of the peroxalate micelles for in vivo imaging of hydrogen peroxide, given their high sensitivity, small size, and biocompatible PEG corona.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus