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A tropical marine microbial natural products geobibliography as an example of desktop exploration of current research using web visualisation tools.

Mukherjee J, Llewellyn LE, Evans-Illidge EA - Mar Drugs (2008)

Bottom Line: Global visualisation of datasets is now becoming available to the world through powerful and readily available software such as Worldwind, ArcGIS Explorer and Google Earth.Here we demonstrate the value of this approach to marine microbial biodiscovery by developing a geobibliography that incorporates citations on tropical and near-tropical marine microbial natural products research with Google Earth and additional ancillary global data sets.The tools and software used are all readily available and the reader is able to use and install the material described in this article.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Environmental Studies, Jadavpur University, Kolkata 700032, India. joydeep_envstu@school.jdvu.ac.in

ABSTRACT
Microbial marine biodiscovery is a recent scientific endeavour developing at a time when information and other technologies are also undergoing great technical strides. Global visualisation of datasets is now becoming available to the world through powerful and readily available software such as Worldwind, ArcGIS Explorer and Google Earth. Overlaying custom information upon these tools is within the hands of every scientist and more and more scientific organisations are making data available that can also be integrated into these global visualisation tools. The integrated global view that these tools enable provides a powerful desktop exploration tool. Here we demonstrate the value of this approach to marine microbial biodiscovery by developing a geobibliography that incorporates citations on tropical and near-tropical marine microbial natural products research with Google Earth and additional ancillary global data sets. The tools and software used are all readily available and the reader is able to use and install the material described in this article.

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Anthropogenic biomes as described by Ellis and Ramankutty [25] in relation to tropical microbial marine biodiscovery efforts and the Google Earth™ file can be downloaded from www.eoearth.org/article/Anthropogenic_biome_maps
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f8-md-06-00550: Anthropogenic biomes as described by Ellis and Ramankutty [25] in relation to tropical microbial marine biodiscovery efforts and the Google Earth™ file can be downloaded from www.eoearth.org/article/Anthropogenic_biome_maps

Mentions: Figure 7 shows the location of tropical marine microbial biodiscovery research (in the geobibliography) overlaid with the location of global population. Some of the world’s most populated nations are located within the tropics and this can lead to significant pressures upon marine ecosystems through agricultural practices (eg sediment and agrichemical run-off), fishing, shipping and other human practices. Study of the impact of humanity upon nature has led the term anthropocene and the classification of the earth’s surface in terms of anthropogenic biomes [25], and measurements of resulting human impacts on the marine environment [38]. The existence of induced environmental stressors and their potential to elicit novel bioactivity, will be of interest to biodiscovery researchers. Figure 8 illustrates the geobibliography with respect to Ellis and Ramankutty’s biomes [25], while Figure 9 overlays the scale of human impacts on the marine environment as described by Halpern et al [38]. These figures indicate that few if any of the citations in the geobibliography have isolated marine microorganisms from marine ecosystems untouched by human activity.


A tropical marine microbial natural products geobibliography as an example of desktop exploration of current research using web visualisation tools.

Mukherjee J, Llewellyn LE, Evans-Illidge EA - Mar Drugs (2008)

Anthropogenic biomes as described by Ellis and Ramankutty [25] in relation to tropical microbial marine biodiscovery efforts and the Google Earth™ file can be downloaded from www.eoearth.org/article/Anthropogenic_biome_maps
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2630847&req=5

f8-md-06-00550: Anthropogenic biomes as described by Ellis and Ramankutty [25] in relation to tropical microbial marine biodiscovery efforts and the Google Earth™ file can be downloaded from www.eoearth.org/article/Anthropogenic_biome_maps
Mentions: Figure 7 shows the location of tropical marine microbial biodiscovery research (in the geobibliography) overlaid with the location of global population. Some of the world’s most populated nations are located within the tropics and this can lead to significant pressures upon marine ecosystems through agricultural practices (eg sediment and agrichemical run-off), fishing, shipping and other human practices. Study of the impact of humanity upon nature has led the term anthropocene and the classification of the earth’s surface in terms of anthropogenic biomes [25], and measurements of resulting human impacts on the marine environment [38]. The existence of induced environmental stressors and their potential to elicit novel bioactivity, will be of interest to biodiscovery researchers. Figure 8 illustrates the geobibliography with respect to Ellis and Ramankutty’s biomes [25], while Figure 9 overlays the scale of human impacts on the marine environment as described by Halpern et al [38]. These figures indicate that few if any of the citations in the geobibliography have isolated marine microorganisms from marine ecosystems untouched by human activity.

Bottom Line: Global visualisation of datasets is now becoming available to the world through powerful and readily available software such as Worldwind, ArcGIS Explorer and Google Earth.Here we demonstrate the value of this approach to marine microbial biodiscovery by developing a geobibliography that incorporates citations on tropical and near-tropical marine microbial natural products research with Google Earth and additional ancillary global data sets.The tools and software used are all readily available and the reader is able to use and install the material described in this article.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Environmental Studies, Jadavpur University, Kolkata 700032, India. joydeep_envstu@school.jdvu.ac.in

ABSTRACT
Microbial marine biodiscovery is a recent scientific endeavour developing at a time when information and other technologies are also undergoing great technical strides. Global visualisation of datasets is now becoming available to the world through powerful and readily available software such as Worldwind, ArcGIS Explorer and Google Earth. Overlaying custom information upon these tools is within the hands of every scientist and more and more scientific organisations are making data available that can also be integrated into these global visualisation tools. The integrated global view that these tools enable provides a powerful desktop exploration tool. Here we demonstrate the value of this approach to marine microbial biodiscovery by developing a geobibliography that incorporates citations on tropical and near-tropical marine microbial natural products research with Google Earth and additional ancillary global data sets. The tools and software used are all readily available and the reader is able to use and install the material described in this article.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus