Limits...
A tropical marine microbial natural products geobibliography as an example of desktop exploration of current research using web visualisation tools.

Mukherjee J, Llewellyn LE, Evans-Illidge EA - Mar Drugs (2008)

Bottom Line: Global visualisation of datasets is now becoming available to the world through powerful and readily available software such as Worldwind, ArcGIS Explorer and Google Earth.Here we demonstrate the value of this approach to marine microbial biodiscovery by developing a geobibliography that incorporates citations on tropical and near-tropical marine microbial natural products research with Google Earth and additional ancillary global data sets.The tools and software used are all readily available and the reader is able to use and install the material described in this article.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Environmental Studies, Jadavpur University, Kolkata 700032, India. joydeep_envstu@school.jdvu.ac.in

ABSTRACT
Microbial marine biodiscovery is a recent scientific endeavour developing at a time when information and other technologies are also undergoing great technical strides. Global visualisation of datasets is now becoming available to the world through powerful and readily available software such as Worldwind, ArcGIS Explorer and Google Earth. Overlaying custom information upon these tools is within the hands of every scientist and more and more scientific organisations are making data available that can also be integrated into these global visualisation tools. The integrated global view that these tools enable provides a powerful desktop exploration tool. Here we demonstrate the value of this approach to marine microbial biodiscovery by developing a geobibliography that incorporates citations on tropical and near-tropical marine microbial natural products research with Google Earth and additional ancillary global data sets. The tools and software used are all readily available and the reader is able to use and install the material described in this article.

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

Distribution of research efforts related to sea surface temperature (SST). The depicted SST’s are the composites from December 1 2007 to January 1 2008 obtained from the NASA Earth Observatory program using data from both the AQUA and MODIS satellites. Increasing redness indicates increased SST
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2630847&req=5

f5-md-06-00550: Distribution of research efforts related to sea surface temperature (SST). The depicted SST’s are the composites from December 1 2007 to January 1 2008 obtained from the NASA Earth Observatory program using data from both the AQUA and MODIS satellites. Increasing redness indicates increased SST

Mentions: Figure 5 shows a one month snapshot of Sea Surface Temperatures (SST) overlaying the geobibliography. The temperature data used is a composite of SSTs recorded during the period December 1 2007 to January 1 2008. The SST dataset used here and displayed in Figure 5 is but one example of multiple datasets from many different time periods that can be downloaded form the NASA Earth Observatory (http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/). It is known that SSTs can change at a range of time scales, from daily to longer term. Annual and decadal changes in patterns of SST can be influenced by changes in global phenomena such as the El Nino Southern Oscillation that occurs in the Pacific [67]. As a result, warm water can oscillate between the northern and southern hemispheres in the different seasons. Thus, access to alternative datasets would enable a range of alternate analyses of the geobibliography, such as examining the prevailing sea surface temperature regime that existed when a particular organism was collected for a reported publication.


A tropical marine microbial natural products geobibliography as an example of desktop exploration of current research using web visualisation tools.

Mukherjee J, Llewellyn LE, Evans-Illidge EA - Mar Drugs (2008)

Distribution of research efforts related to sea surface temperature (SST). The depicted SST’s are the composites from December 1 2007 to January 1 2008 obtained from the NASA Earth Observatory program using data from both the AQUA and MODIS satellites. Increasing redness indicates increased SST
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2630847&req=5

f5-md-06-00550: Distribution of research efforts related to sea surface temperature (SST). The depicted SST’s are the composites from December 1 2007 to January 1 2008 obtained from the NASA Earth Observatory program using data from both the AQUA and MODIS satellites. Increasing redness indicates increased SST
Mentions: Figure 5 shows a one month snapshot of Sea Surface Temperatures (SST) overlaying the geobibliography. The temperature data used is a composite of SSTs recorded during the period December 1 2007 to January 1 2008. The SST dataset used here and displayed in Figure 5 is but one example of multiple datasets from many different time periods that can be downloaded form the NASA Earth Observatory (http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/). It is known that SSTs can change at a range of time scales, from daily to longer term. Annual and decadal changes in patterns of SST can be influenced by changes in global phenomena such as the El Nino Southern Oscillation that occurs in the Pacific [67]. As a result, warm water can oscillate between the northern and southern hemispheres in the different seasons. Thus, access to alternative datasets would enable a range of alternate analyses of the geobibliography, such as examining the prevailing sea surface temperature regime that existed when a particular organism was collected for a reported publication.

Bottom Line: Global visualisation of datasets is now becoming available to the world through powerful and readily available software such as Worldwind, ArcGIS Explorer and Google Earth.Here we demonstrate the value of this approach to marine microbial biodiscovery by developing a geobibliography that incorporates citations on tropical and near-tropical marine microbial natural products research with Google Earth and additional ancillary global data sets.The tools and software used are all readily available and the reader is able to use and install the material described in this article.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Environmental Studies, Jadavpur University, Kolkata 700032, India. joydeep_envstu@school.jdvu.ac.in

ABSTRACT
Microbial marine biodiscovery is a recent scientific endeavour developing at a time when information and other technologies are also undergoing great technical strides. Global visualisation of datasets is now becoming available to the world through powerful and readily available software such as Worldwind, ArcGIS Explorer and Google Earth. Overlaying custom information upon these tools is within the hands of every scientist and more and more scientific organisations are making data available that can also be integrated into these global visualisation tools. The integrated global view that these tools enable provides a powerful desktop exploration tool. Here we demonstrate the value of this approach to marine microbial biodiscovery by developing a geobibliography that incorporates citations on tropical and near-tropical marine microbial natural products research with Google Earth and additional ancillary global data sets. The tools and software used are all readily available and the reader is able to use and install the material described in this article.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus